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OCTOBER 1 99 J 

ISSUE 0373 

USA $2.95 

CAN $3.95 

A WGE Publication 
International Edition 



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Letters 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Bobby DeVito, Tampa FL I'm writing 
to let you know how much I enjoy your 
column in 73 Magazine I've been in- 
terested in amateur radio for almost 15 
years now (I am 26), and just passed 
my codeless Tech exam fast month. I 
am extremely thankful thai I am now 
going to be a ham, and I will try harder 
to learn the code so I can be a General , 

Even though i am a "no-coder," 1 still 
feet that I have as much or more to 
contribute to amateur radio as anyone. 
I've been involved in electron ics since I 
was a child (my fat he' helped develop 
the first GTE-Sylvania Technical 
Schools) and have been through the 
Navy BE&E and Electron ic Warfare 
schools. I am a professional musician, 
wonting on my second album (sorry, 
but it's rock, not ragtime), and also do 
some studio engineering. And I've al- 
ways loved ham radio! Mow at least 
when I goon the road t I can lake my HT 
with me and possibly make some 
friends, if they will condescend to 
speak with a >J no-coder." 

OK, now that I'm finished blowing my 
own horn, I can get to the heart of the 
matter, I really enjoy your column and I 
think that you are a positive force for 
the entire amateur community. You're 
a really good writer, and t enjoy your 
styte. And your sense of humor. 

You'll hear from me again. For now 
I'm stuck in VHF and UHF land, but I 
will make it to HF one day. If your ears 
can stand instrumental rock guitar mu- 
sic, I'll send you a copy of my last al- 
bum. Guitar Sated, Hopefully, Ml be 
able to elmer some of my musician 
friends, Keep up the good work, and 
NEVER SAY DIE! 

Sid Lynch KC4ZVJ, Jacksonville FL I 
would like to home-brew a 2 meter FM 
transceiver base station, Ideally, the 
rig will have repeater offset, digital fre- 
quency readout, and tone encode ca- 
pability. 

I'm having a great deal of difficulty 
locating construction articles or plans 
for such a rig. It seems that most con- 
struction articles focus on HF-ORP- 
CW rigs. Is there a reason for this, 
gwen the growth of the no-code Tech 
class that cannot legally operate such 
rigs? 

is it possible to home-brew a ng like 
the one I'm talking about without an 
electronics degree and a lab? I would 
appreciate any advice you may have 
that could lead me to information on 
such rigs. 

I figure that if it is possible to get a 
decent VHF home-brew set on the air, 
this would open alt sorts of other 
projects. For example, (would love to 
home-brew a packet station or perhaps 
get into satellite via home-brew. 

Sid~ You might want to check out 
Ramsey's 2m FM transceiver kit. 
They've been setting so well we haven 7 
been able to get one for review yet. 

As for a 2m FM total home-brew con- 
struction project how about if, read- 
ers? If anybody's put together such a 
project, we'd love to take a took at 
it. David N1GPH 

Pete Stark K20AW, Mt. Kisco NY I 
vote for "Poor Man's Packet" by 
WB2EMS and N8KEI as possibly the 
best ham radio article and project of 



From the Hamshack 

the last 1 years, it not more, 

1 haven't built it yet, but I have a 
hunch the PMP project may have a 
feature the authors haven't mentioned; 
by eliminating the TNC wllh its CPU. 
etc. , the PMP may also eliminate much 
Of the QRM which normally makes it 
really tough to use an HT without a 
remote antenna. 

Joel E. Oumont KA1LNJ, South 
Deed i eld MA I have been a licensed 
amateur radio operator since 1984. 
This past spring. I upgraded to Techni- 
cian, thanks to the encouragement of 
the Mount Tom Amateur Repealer As- 
sociation's class, taught by KtMEA. I 
am now halfway to General class, hav- 
ing passed the written portion of the 
test. 

I do not object to the possibility of 
paying a fee for an amateur radio li- 
cense In fact, I agree with the idea of 
paying $5 a year for the 10-year li- 
cense I sent cards to that effect to the 
representatives and senators listed in 
your July editorial. 

I applaud your efforts to locus ham 
radio on fun, talking, and tinkering. Af- 
ter all, this is supposed to be a hobby, 
right? I think it is still possible for inno- 
vation to come from hobbyists, since 
most big companies tend to stifle cre- 
ativity in the name ot conformity and 
order It may take a lot of money to 
develop and market things, but ideas 
come to those who have the time and 
interest 

WE Bennett N7IVM, Bellevue WA 

This lime you've -ealiy done it. There 
are probably hams all over the U.S.A. 
who are foaming at the mouth! License 
feesf 

Seriously, I have always felt that the 
decision to eliminate fees was a poten- 
tial weapon to be used against amateur 
radio. My only reservation is whether it 
is possible to get the fees where they 
should be. into that section of the FCC 
which is concerned with our affairs. I 
don't want a free ride, but 1 would like 
my "fare Pf to help keep my "bus f ' on 
the road! 

George C. Fennel! N3EOE, Butler PA 

On the ham front in Butler County, 
things are realty cookin"! I am pleased 
to announce thai my latest Novice/ 
Technician class yielded nine new ham 
operators to our ranks, six of them be- 
ing "codeless Techs." and more are 
coming aboard due to the long overdue 
codeless license. 

Also, ATV is alive, well, and being 
heavily promoted In the area. We are in 
possession of an ATV repeater and all 
the "goodies" to go with it. and have 
received permission from the local VA 
Hospital to place it in operation upon 
their rooftop tower. This location is 
prime, and will enable everyone in But- 
ler and the county-wide area easy ac- 
cess to the machine. Right now there 
are seven individuals m the process of 
purchasing ATV gear, and many more 
Contemplating the move. 

Keep rt up . .you're our inspiration 
and guiding light! 

Mark A, Stevens AB4YE This past 
lunch hour, I spent time reading over 
the last three years of gloom and doom 
from your editorials. Gaspl ... I agree 
with you. We have no hope of keeping 



our frequencies with arguments to the 
FCC that we are a vttal national re- 
source, that the bands we have now 
are crowded, that we are on the cutting 
edge of technology, etc. 

If we are going to be able to keep our 
frequencies . . I think mat we need to 
get down to basics, Business is going 
to do everything it can to lobby us out of 
our airspace. Problem is, there realty is 
no room left tor continuous growth of 
radio technology as it's now envi- 
sioned. As soon as they take our fre- 
quencies away from us, they will find 
that they still don't have alt the room 
they need, and they will have to devel- 
op other ways of transmitting data for 
profit (As archaic as they look now. 
phone lines hold more promise for data 
transmission than do radio waves,) 
One of our first priorities must be to 
convince the FCC of this fact: Ham ra- 
dio's frequency space is only a small 
crack in the wall of physics that limits 
tne amount of usable radio frequency 
space available for profit making. Once 
our ham bands are gone, they're gone 
for good . . , and for nothing. 

We need to look at our ham bands as 
a valuable, disappearing national re* 
source, just as we look at our national 
forests. As hams, we have to stop 
telting ourselves how valuable we are. 
how important our mission is. and start 
telling the government how valuable 
public frequency space is to the nation. 
We need to make it known to anyone 
who will listen that we love our radios 
the way some people love their 
campers or motorcycles or coins or 
guns. We need to make our case for 
our right to keep what we enjoy 

We need to cease being a bunch of 
emergency chasing, council meeting, 
jurisdiction disputing political idiots 
who do nothing but set up ego gratify- 
ing repeater councils and radio sod* 
eties, then spend any remaining time 
trying to find someone to take to court 
We need to become a unified group of 
hobby-loving individuals who will effec- 
tively let the world know how much we 
appreciate the little reserves of public 
frequency space we now have .... 

We are not on a mission from God, 
We need our national parks, and we 
need our international frequencies 
... not because we are an asset to the 
nation, but because the frequencies 
are an asset to the public, an asset too 
valuable to leave entirety to business 
interests, 

I, as a ham, am not an indispensable 
asset vital to the correct functioning of 
our military and emergency ser- 
vices ham radio is an asset to me 
personally. I know that the world could 
get along without me. but I surely don't 
know what I (we hams) would do with- 
out ham radio, 

Jeff Kinsman NH6VH From time to 
time we all get a bit disillusioned with 
amateur radio. Then something comes 
along to refresh our sense of wonder 
and faith in hams and the hobby, 
Something like that happened to me 
last spring when we were in the Per- 
sian Gulf with H+ Desert StormJ* I'm the 
chief operator of the MARS station on- 
board the aircraft carrier USS Ntmrtz. 
In addition to running phone patches 
via MARS, we've formed a group of 
amateurs to promote ham radio on- 
board. Anyway, as luck would have it. 
we 'smoked checked" the finals in our 
amplifier when we got underway Sure 
enough, when we arrived in the Gulf, 
we couldn't contact any MARS stations 
back in the states using a barefoot ng. 



With over 6,000 men on Nimitz, the 
need for contact with home is vital . We 
thought we were sunk — literally! To my 
Surprise, amateurs all over the US. re- 
sponded to our call for help. They 
stayed up late running patches {many 
times at their own expense), relayed 
message traffic, and generally kept our 
spirits high during a difficult deploy- 
ment. 

Their extra effort proved to me that 
although we have our differences in 
the hobby, when the chips are down, 
we pull together and bring out the best 
we have to offer. Isn't that the founda- 
tion of amateur radio— service to fellow 
citizens? The next time you're de- 
pressed after reading gloom and doom 
letters, ask a sailor from the USS A/im- 
ftzwhat he lb inks of ham radio — your 
wonder and faith wilt be renewed! 

Daniel M. Jordan AA9AN, Evansville 
IN I am writing this letter about contests 
on the amateur bands. I have been an 
amateur radio operator for 15 years 
now, I am 28 years old, and have a 
famify. Since my job and my family take 
up a lot of time. I usually try to get on 
the radio on the weekends when J can. 
But it seems to me every weekend 
there's another contest, 

Now, don't get me wrong; I have 
nothing against contests. I'm sure 
they're an exciting aspect of the hobby. 
But why should a few people's enjoy- 
ment ruin it for everybody else? I'm not 
saying do away with contests, but limit 
them to a certain portion of each ama- 
teur band. Just look at the contest sec* 
(ton of each amateur publication and 
if s packed. Every little dub has its own 
contest weekend, Before long, there 
won't be standard ham radio contacts, 
just one long 365-days-a-year contest. 
I ask that any ham who is tired of being 
interfered with to please drop the FCC 
a note and voice your opinion. Maybe 
together we can all use our radios 
again. 

Daniel— Please don't bug the FCC. 
This is not a situation where they couid 
or would do anything — except get even 
more disgusted with ham operators 
who come crying to them every time 
they don't like something. Why don't 
you try writing a dear and constructive 
letter to the organizations who sponsor 
the contests? They are the ones who 
can change the contest rules. Your 
idea has merit. Jus? make sure you di- 
rect your energy in a positive way— and 
toward the proper authority. . . . David 
NtGPH 

0arre1l Davis KC4KGN, Fort Meade 
FL I enjoy reading your editorials every 
month, 1 have been licensed for a little 
over two years now and have enjoyed 
every bit of it. I got into amateur radio 
because of computers and computer 
communications, and experimenting, 
which I enjoy, I do mostly digital on HF 
and very little phone except checking 
into the ARES Net on HF. I am an assis- 
tant EC. for ARES here in Polk Coun- 
ty, Only phone I do is on 2 meter FM 
repeater or simplex. Trying to get start* 
ed in satellite. I am 22 years old, so you 
do not have to be an otd -timer to enjoy 
this hobby. 

I am afraid that your predictions will 
come true unless some changes are 
made. The old men on our bands need 
to get out of their 'live and die by CW" 
attitude and realize that Part 3 of the 
Amateurs Code exists: "The Amateur 
is Progressive/' I like your end-chew- 
ing of your readers to get them to think 
forthemsefves, 



2 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October, 1991 



THE TEAM 

PUflLlSHER/EDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
David CassidyNIGPH 



MANAGING EDITOR 
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PRODUCTION EDITOR 
Hope Currier 

SENIOR EDITOR 
Linda ReneauKAIUKM 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Joyce Sawteile 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
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DawdCowhigWAlLBP 
Mtchaei GeierKBlUM 
JjmGrayWl)(U/7 
Chuck Houghton WB6iGP 
Am*JrjhfisonNlBAC 
Or Marc leavey WA3AJR 
Andy MacAllisier WA5ZIB 
Joe Moell K*OV 
JimMorrissettK6MH 
Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
Carole Perry WB2MGP 
Sob Winn W5KNE 



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Wayne Green Enterprises is a division 
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Reprints: The first copy of an article 
$3.00 [each additional copy— $1 50). 
Write to 73 Amateur Radio Magazine, 
WGE Center, Forest Road, Hancock, 

NH 03449. 



7£A ma teur 



OCTOBER 1991 
Issue #373 



Radio Today 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 



8 The Sudden Receiver 

A simple-to-build receiver for 1 BO- 
SOM G3RJV 



14 A 10M Sideband Transmitter 
Add voice to your QRP station, 

NZSG 

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27 Simple Gain Antenna for 903 MHz 

Build it for under $25 AD5X 

28 Microprocessor Repeater 
Controller, Part I 

Add versatility to your repeater sys* 
tern . , . W83ESS 



46 Low-Pass Antenna Tuner 

Match your antenna while reducing 
harmonics with this unique de- 
siQn kb^zgg 



REVIEWS 



42 Kenwood's TH-77A Dual-Band 
Walkie 

Super-packed with features! 
KB1UM 

SO The Drake R8 Receiver 

Tune in the world with this hot new 
receiver WA4BLC 




DEPARTMENTS 



60 Above and Beyond 
72 Ad Index 

53 Ask K a boom 

54 ATV 

68 Barter *n* Buy 
53 Dealer Directory 
17 Feedback Index 
74 Ham Help 
48 Hams with Class 
62 Hamsats 
52 Homing In 

2 Letters 

4 Never Say Die 
84 New Products 
84 Propagation 
78 QRP 

7 QRX 
84 Random Output 
74 RTTY Loop 
56 73 International 
70 Special Events 
86 Uncle Wayne's 
Bookshelf 



Bwfd The Sudden . , page 8 



Cover design by Alice Scot] eld. Cover photo by Larry Dunn, 



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Haw? Just take advanuge 
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anick and column- Wed 
Like you to rate whai you 
read so thai we can prim 
what types of things you 
lite best. And then we 
will draw one Feedback 
card each month for a 
free subscription to 73 . 




m 



Editorial Offices 

WGE Cents* 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone: 603-525-4201 



Advertising Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone: 800-225-5083 



Circulation Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone : 603-525-4201 



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73 Amateur Radio Today (ISSN 1052-2522) is published monthly by WGE Publishing, inc., WGE 
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No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. For 
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12 issues of the best amateur radio magazine out there, then why not buy a gift subscription for a 
deserving Novice, Tech. potential ham. library or school radio club? 






73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October; 1991 3 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Never sa y die 

Wayne Green W2NSD/1 




Wayne's Ego 

Now and then I get a nasty gram 
bitching about my inflated ego. Tm not 
sure why readers are concerned about 
me no! having a low sense of self- 
esteem Sore. I enjoy getting apprecia- 
tive letters and 1 hate getting nasty 
ones. I particularly love getting letters 
from readers who tell me I've had a 
positive effect on their lives. 

Yes, I do tend to aim my writing to- 
ward my more intelligent readers, but 
not out of arrogance or imperiousness 
. . . I just don't feel comfortable talking 
(writing) down to people, it isn't in my 
mind to say, hey, look how incredibly 
Smart I am . look how much I know, I 
write to help people understand things. 
No one can be an expert on everything, 
including me. But 1 do feel a need to 
share the things that I've learned or 
enjoy with others. 

I keep urging you to try new ham 
activities. But I haven't asked you to do 
anything I haven't done. I've done 
moonbounce, made many OSCAR 
contacts, worked seven slates on 10 
GHz, won Sweepstakes, VHF and OX 
contests, DXpeditioned from dozens of 
countries, worked around 350 coun- 
tries, and so on. I helped pioneer 
NBFM, SSB, RTTY t SSTV t etc I've 
built all kinds of gear . . , and I've had 
so much fun doing all this that IVe 
probably been a nag trying to get you to 
share my fun. 

Yes. of course I have an ego. You 
mean you haven't? And I like you to 
know some of my wins Bui I also share 
my bad times with you . . like my loss 
of Byte , one of the worst traumas of my 
life And my bout with the IBS, which 
probably ties with the Byte epic. 

Like most of you, I do dumb tnsngs. 
Like letting myself be talked into run- 
ning for VP a few years ago, ft seemed 
like a good way to get some exposure 
for my ideas on improving education, 
solving the welfare mess, and helping 
the homeless. I let my enthusiasm 
carry me away into tela land. I should 
have known that the media has virtual- 
ly zero interest in constructive, creative 
ideas. They're after bad news, so they 
concentrated on my old IRS debacle. 
Bad news sells papers, and journalists 
aren't about to forget it. 

I was reminded of that when an ex- 
governor of New Hampshire called re- 
cently and asked it I would consider 



running for VP again. I gather there is a 
lot of anxiety about Quayle and many 
politicians are looking for viable alter- 
natives. Not me. thanks. I'm an idea 
person, not a politician. 

As I said at the time I ran , my concept 
of the vice-president was (hat he 
should be responsible for running na- 
tional affairs, while the president would 
handle the international stuff. That's 
almost what we actually got, Bush has 
been handling foreign affairs. It's just 
thai, as far as I can see, no one's been 
running the country, 

A corporate VP has responsibilities 
other than twiddling his thumbs, watt- 
ing for fhecali. A VP is usually respon- 
sible for running a major aspect of the 
business. Welt, why should running the 
country be different? 

I think we all agree that the country 
would do better with some manage- 
ment Our educational system is a 
disaster, The drug problem hasn't im- 
proved, despite task forces and end- 
less propaganda, Crime is still getting 
worse. I'm not aware of any changes in 
the welfare mess, in improving the un- 
employment situation, or helping ease 
the homeless problem. Look at the 
S&L. the BCGI and other banking 
messes, our decaying infrastructure, 
the HUD disaster, the continuing de- 
fense contracting and environmental 
messes' Quayle, what m hell have you 
been doing? Playing golf and making 
"good wilt" trips? 

Medical costs are going up faster 
than inflation. College costs are zoom* 
ing. Organized crime is stronger than 
ever. Heck. I'm up againsl 'em in /woof 
the industries I'm in. With no national 
leadership, there's no reason to expect 
things to improve. 

Yes, I probably could help with many 
of those problems, but I don't need the 
aggravation. No amount of money 
could get me involved with the bureau- 
cractic quagmires involved. Not even 
my vaunted ego could do it I'm very 
busy and happy doing what I'm doing. 

Both Bush and Reagan have han- 
dled the situation well. They've kept 
their hands off running the country and 
blamed Congress for everything, May* 
be you missed the 7/22 Time editorial 
(p. 70) on exactly that subject. Too bad; 
you shouldn't 

To help amateur radio grow faster. 
I've started Radio Fun. I believe this 
will help lots of hams get more fun from 



our hobby. I hope it will make teaming 
theory more fun. I hope it will make 
trying new modes and bands more fun 
too. 

Bui I'm also in the middle of starling 
a new company to put out sampler CDs 
to help the record companies get their 
new releases selling taster. Major New 
Releases (MNR) is gearing up to put 
out two or more samplers a month 
We'll be sending these CDs to some 
10\000 record stores, bundled with our 
Music R eta if ing publication. . .and giv- 
ing another 15,000 or so absolutely, 
totally, completely. 100% FREE to my 
CD Review readers. 

My Adventures In Music (AIM) sam- 
plers (also FREE) project, each with 
tracks from 16 or so different indepen- 
dent record company releases, has 
been a huge success . . and needs to 
be expanded 

Another new project is our (MPS 
Journal, which will go monthly to over 
5 : OO0 independent music producers. 
Then there's our Guide to FREE Mu- 
sic, starting in November. And more 
CD releases from my Greener Pas- 
tures Records. Yep, I'm busy. My only 
major problem is a desperate need for 
more people to help do all these things. 

I'd love to organize ham tours to Eu- 
rope, Africa and Asia. The hams there 
would love to meet us and host us. But 
travel costs money, and most hams 
seem to be terribly short of that, Where 
have all of you been while the banks 
were handing out billions? Were you 
noted up in your hams hack dit-dahing 
while the money trees were being 
stripped? 

I remember one creative ham who 
went around the world, visiting rare 
countries and charging top dollar to 
DXers for contacts. He told me he was 
pulling down around a quarter of a mil* 
lion a year. I don't think he was exag- 
gerating, 

I organized a ham European tour 
back in 1963. It was a corker, with 73 of 
us on the trip. We had hamfests in Lorv 
don. Pans, Geneva, Rome, and Berlin. 
None of the hams on that trip will ever 
forget it! I see several ol them every 
year at Dayton and (hey still remind me 
how much fun they had. 

I tried to do another En 1966, but by 
then ARRL's "incentive licensing" 
proposal had gutled the hobby, and it 
was all over. I did conduct electronic 
and computer tours to Asia in the 80s , 



but we seldom had more than a dozen 
hams along . . . compared to 250 on the 
tours. 

Now I'm planning some music indus- 
try tours, which should be fun. But 
wouldn't you enjoy going to Africa with 
me and getting on the air from 306 or 
7P8? Wouldn't you like to visit ZS and 
talk with the local hams and get their 
perspective on what's going on down 
there? They'd love to have you come t I 
promise you, 

Alas, before I can round up ham tour 
groups and lead them fearlessly to ex- 
citing new adventures, hams are going 
to have to have more disposable in- 
come. Any red-blooded ham would 
love to get on the air from a rare country 
and brave the pileups. Talk about ego! 
Suddenly you're a star and the whole 
wortd is groveling at your feet for the 
kiss of your OSL Oh, if you only had 
the money, what a fantastic time you 
could have! 

But making money means changing 
Most people have never made any 
more money than they needed. Heck, 
they've never made quite as much as 
they fee I they need. But making money 
means working harder, and we're all 
basically lazy, so we make do and be- 
grudge those who do work harder the 
fun they can afford, 

A few people either tuck into it or are 
smart enough to figure out how to 
make more money without having to 
work so hard. It doesn't take a comput- 
er scientist to notice that entrepre- 
neurs seem to have a much better 
batting average on getting hen than 
people working for the government, 
for large corporations or teaching. 
Hmmm, with the same amount of ef- 
fort, you stand a chance of hitting the 
jackpot. Golly! 

So I've been irritating the hell out of 
73 readers for the last 30 years point- 
ing this out. My ego does expand 
momentarily when I near from a reader 
who's taken my advice and found it 
worked. But most hams . . and for 
some reason this seems to be particu- 
larly centered on ARRL stalwarts 
put me down as crazy and keep on 
staying poor, I've never met either a 
Smart or a rich ARRL supporter. _and 
I've sure met a tot of hams, 

I used to spread my gospel via my 
computer magazines, too . and now 
I'm at it in my music magazines. Is all 
this ego driven? tt doesn't seem tike it 
to me, but then how many of us recog- 
nize our faults? I love it when 1 hear 
from someone I've helped, , .and I 
brag a little at the time, But I don't 
forget that gratitude is one of the least 
felt of human emotions, so I expect I'll 
have as many friends at my funeral as I 
did to support me when the IRS did a 
job on me. And, at 69, that funeral is 
getting closer. Makes it more difficult 
10 make long-range plans . which 
hurts, because there's so much that 
needs to be done and so few people 
interested in helping. 

Amateur radio is the greatest and 
most valuable hobby in the world. It 
should be spread to every third world 
country so they'll be able to cope with 

Continued on page B0 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 




KENWOOD 



Com_ 

TH-27A/47A 

2 m and 70 cm Super 
Compact HTs 

Here is a great new addition to 
Kenwood's HT family — the all new 
TH-27A tor 2 meters and TH-47A for 
70 cm! Super compact and beau* 
tifully designed, these pocket- 
sized twins give you full-size 
performance. 

• Large capacity NiCd battery 
pack supplied. The standard 
battery pack is 72 volts, 700 mAh, 
providing extended transmit time 
with 2.5 watts. (TH-47A: 1.5 W) 

• Extended receive coverage. 
TH-27A: 118-165 MHz;TH-47A: 
438-449,995 MHz. TX on Amateur 
bands only, (TH-27A modifiable for 
MARS/CAP Permits required. Spec* 
ifications guaranteed for Amateur 
bands only.) 

• Multi-function scanning* 
Band and memory channels can 
be scanned, with time operated 
or carrier operated scan stop. 

• Frequency step selectable for 
quick OSY. Choose from 5 t 10, 12.5, 
15, 20 t or 25 kHz steps. 
Built-in digital clock with 
programmable timer. 

• Dual Tone Squelch System 
(DTSS). Compatible with the 
TH-26AT Series and the 
TM-941A Triple bander, as 
well as other Kenwood 
series transceivers, this 
selective calling system 
uses standard DTMF to open 
squelch, 

• Five watts output when operated 
with PB-14 battery pack or 13.8 volts. 

•T- Alert for quiet monitoring. 
Tone Alert beeps when squelch 
is opened, 

• Auto battery saver, auto power 
off function, and economy power 
mode extends battery life. 

• DTMF memory. The DTMF 
memory function can be used as 
an auto-dialer All characters from 
the 16-key pad can be stored, 
allowing repeater control codes 
to be stored! 

Specifications and features are subject to change without notice or obligation. 

Complete service manuals arc available tor ail Kenwood transceivers and most accessories. 



,ct Champion! 



• 41 memories All channels 
store receive and transmit 
separately for +i odd split* 

DC direct in operation. 

Allows external DC to be 
used (72 - 16 volts). 
When external power is 
used, the batteries are 
being charged. 
(PB-13 only.) 



Optional accessories; 

• BC-14: Wall chargerfor PB-13 • BC-15 

Rapid charger for PB-13, 14 » BC-1S: Wall 
chargerfor PB-14 * BH-6: Swivel mount 

• BT-8 : Six cell AA Alkaline battery case 

• HMC-2 Headset with VOX and PTT 

• PB-13 : 72 V, 700 mAh NiCd pack • PB-14: 
12 V, 300 mAh NiCd pack * PG-3F: DC 
cable with fitter and cigarette lighter plug 

• PG-2W; DC cable * SC-31: Soft case 

• SMC- 31: Standard speaker 
mre«SMC-32; Compact 
speaker mic * SMC-33: 

Compact speaker miCj 
with controls 
• WR-2:Waterj 
resistant 
bag. 



iOO° 






I* 



Q&€ 



* Automatic offset selection 
(TH-27A). 

* Direct keyboard frequency entry. 
The rotary dial can also be used 
to select memory, frequency, 
frequency step, CTCSS, and 

scan direction. 

• CTCSS encode/decode built-in. 

• Supplied accessories: 
Rubber flex antenna, battery pack, 
wail charger, belt hook, wrist strap, 
dust caps. 



KENWOOD USA. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS &TEST EQUIPMENT GROUP 

P.O. BOX 22745. 2201 E Dominguez Street 
Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 
RO BOX 1075, 959 Gana Court 
Misstssauga Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 

KENWOOD 

. ..pacesetter in Amateur Radio 



MrTt>*-f-m. 






KENWOOD 



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• '■"' I mi UB 



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~ OUT 






FS-950SD 

elusive" HF Transceiver 

The new TS-950SD is the first 
Amateur Radio transceiver to utilize 
Digital Signal Processing (DSP), a 
high voltage final amplifier, dual 
fluorescent tube digital display and 
digital meter with a peak-hold function 

• Dual Frequency Receive Function. 

TheTS-950SD can receive two fre- 
quencies simultaneously. 

lew! Digital AF filter Synchronized 
with SSB IF slope tuning, the digital AF 
filter provides sharp characteristics for 
optimum filter response. 

• New high voitage final amplifier. 
50 V power transistors in the 150- watt 
final section, resulting in minimum dis- 
tortion and higher efficiency. Fult-power 
key-down time exceeds one hour 

• Now! Built-in microprocessor 
controlled automatic antenna tuner 

• Outstanding general coverage 
receiver performance and sensitivity. 
Kenwood s Dyna-Mix" high sensitivity 
direct mixing system provides incred- 
ible performance from 100 kHz to 

30 MHz. The Intermodulation dynamic 
range is 105 dB. 

• Famous Kenwood interference 
reduction circuits. SSB Slope Tuning, 
CWVBT (Variable Bandwidth Tuning), 
CW AF tune, IF notch filter, dual-mode 
noise blanker with level control, 4-step 
RF attenuator (10, 20 T or 30 dB) n switch- 
able AGC circuit, and all-mode squelch. 

Oxnptete s&rvice manuzts are avatiabto for all Kenwood 
transceivers arid most accessories 
5p&ftfficaffon& teaA/resantf pnees subtect to change without 
fleece or oofrgaiion 



The 
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Signal. 




Digitai Signal Processing 



Without DSP WJthDSP 

• Digital Signal Processo DSP is a 
state-of-the-art technique that maxi 
mizes your transmitted RF energy. 



• High performance IF filters built-in t 

Select various filter combinations from 
the front panel. For CW, 250 and 500 Hz, 
2,4 kHz for SSB, and 6 kHz for AM. Filter 
selections can be stored in memory! 

• MuM-Drfve Band Pass Filter (BPF) 
circuitry, Fifteen band pass filters are 
available in the front end to enhance 
performance. 



• Built-in TCXO for the high 

• Built-in electronic keyer c 

• 100 memory channels Store inde- 
pendent transmit and receive frequen- 
cies, mode, filter data, auto-tuner data 
and CTCSS frequency, 

• Digital bar meter. 

Additional Features: • Built-in inter- 
face for computer control Program- 
mable tone encoder • Built-in heavy 
duty AC power supply and speaker 

Adjustable VFO tuning torque 

Multiple scanning functions 

• MC-43S hand microphone supplied 
Optional Accessories 
► DSP-10 Digital Signal Processor* 

• SQ~2 TCXO* VS-2 Voice synthesizer 

• YK-88C-1 500 Hz CW filter for 8,83 MHz IF* 

• YG-455C-1 500 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF* 

• YK-88CN-1 270 Hz CW filter for 8-83 MHz IF 

• YG-455CN-1 250 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF* 

• YK-88SN-1 1.8 kHz SSB fitter for 8.83 MHz IF 

• YG-455S-T 2.4 kHz SSB filter for 455 kHz IF* 
•SP-950 External speaker w/AF filter 

• SM-230 Station monitor w/pan display 
•SW-2100 SWR/power meter 

• TL-922A Lr near amplifier (not for QSK) 

• Built-in for the TS-950SD 
f Optional for theTS-950S 

KENWOOD USA CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS &TE5T EQUIPMENT GROUP 

P.O. BOX 22745. 2201 E Domingue* Stieel 
Long BeaervCA 90801-574 5 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 

P.O. BOX 1075, 959 Gana Court 
Misslssauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 

KENWOOD 

. . , pacesetter in Amateur Radio 




%Jr\s\ . ■ ■ 



Number 3 an your Feedback card 



EDITED BY UNDA RENEAU KA 1 UKM 



Calling All Hams 



In March 1992, a space shuttle launch is 
planned with the first mission in a series of 
10 flights called ATLAS-1 (Atmospheric 
Laboratory for Applications and Science). 

One of the payloads, SEPAC (Space Experi- 
ments with Particle Accelerators), wilr investi- 
gate the ionosphere and magnetosphere. 
SEPAC will use an 8 kW electron beam modu- 
lated as a VLF transmitter by audio tones be- 
tween 50 Hz and 7 kHz. Attempts will be made 
to receive and record this signal on earth at 
various locations. 

Since there are a limited number of 
ground stations, high school classes and 
the amateur experimental community are 
encouraged to participate in listening to 
and recording transmissions. The footprint 
of the VLF signals will be difficult to define 
without a large number of ground receiving 
stations. A low cost ($35 to $40} kit receiver 
has already been designed and tested by 
amateurs. The complete kit, with full docu- 
mentation and project details, is available 
this fall 

The student effort has been dubbed IN- 
SPIRE (INteractive Space Physics). This 
will be the first time in history that such an 
extensive data taking capability has been 
available to space physics researchers. 
Some 10,000 high schools wilf be invited to 
participate. Participants will also benefit 
from the experience of assembling a simple 
but effective broadband VLF receiver, get- 
ting hand-on experience in obtaining scien- 
tific data, and coordinating a field station, 

During the actual mission, amateur radio 
wilt play a vital role in relaying schedule 
changes for SEPAC transmissions. Ama- 
teur radio is already being used for daily pre- 
mission communications regarding high 
school involvement. Most importantly; local 
ham clubs and individual amateurs can help 
students with kit building and setting up field 
listening operations, Individual amateurs are 
also invited to participate as ground stations 
during the mission. 

For more information on the high school 
connection with project INSPIRE, send an 
SASE (two stamps) to Bill Pine, Science De- 
partment, Chaffey High School, 1245 N, Eu- 
clid Avenue. Ontario CA 91762. Interested 
hams and cfubs should contact (also include a 
two-stamp SASE) Jim Ericson KG6EK, 226 
Charles St., Sunnyvale CA 94086-6063. TNX 
Jim Ericson KG6EK. 

New UHF DX Record 

Two new microwave world records were 
set on Sunday, July 29, when Paul leib 
KH6HME, at the 8200-foot level of the Mona 
Loa volcano, made contact with Chip Angle 
N6CA in Southern California on 3456 MHz at 



2325 UTC. The short CW contact brought a 
signal report of RST 319 over the 2,471-mile 
long path. An hour later, at about 2425 UTC, 
Leib and Angle made a similar CW contact on 
5760 MHz, setting a new world record for that 
band. Each of the stations was running 5 watts 
output to a 4-foot dish antenna, using equip- 
ment specifically designed for the path by 
N6CA. Both contacts were monitored, record- 
ed* and verified by other amaleurs living in the 
Southern California area. TNX Gordon West 
WB6NOA and BUI Pasternak WA61TF for their 
report in the WESTLINK Report. 




Photo A. Chip Angle N&CA in his record-breaking 
portable microwave station. Photo by Gordon West 
W86NOA. 



U.K. Novice license 

Now that the first Novice licenses have 
been awarded In the U.K., the media is 
showing interest. On the BBC's ^news- 
round/' Natasha Weir 2E1AAE was seen con- 
tacting G30UF/P, and Vicky Foster 2E1AAD 
was covered on BBC "Radio 5." Interviews 
are lined up for the TV program "Why Don't 
You . . . ,T and other TV and radio features are 
planned. These wilf be reported in full in a 
future issue of Radio Communication. Ama- 
teurs will now be hearing Novice licensees 
coming over the air, and all the help and pa- 
tience given to these youngsters — and the 
not-so-young newly licensed— by experi- 
enced hams, will ensure mutual enjoyment of 
the hobby. Novice callsign prefixes are: Eng- 
land, 2E; Scotland. 2M; Wales, 2W; Isle of 
Man, 2D; Jersey, 2G; Guernsey, 2U, and 
Northern Ireland, 21. In all cases, these prefix- 
es are followed by either a for Class A or a 1 
for Class B licenses, TNX WESTLINK Report, 
Number 607 f and GB2RS. 



Reciprocity with Mexico 

According to Rudy Baca of the FCC, the 
final reciprocal amateur operating arrange- 
ment with Mexico would be similiar to the 
agreement the U.S. has with Canada. The 
goal is complete reciprocity with Mexico 
. . the operating parameters are still being 
worked out, We expect to have a fairly detailed 
press release shortly. It is a matter of clearing 
everything with Mexico." 

Over a year ago, near Mexico City, at a 
U.S. /Mexico Consultative Group on Com- 
munications conference, Ralph Haller 
N4RH of the Private Radio Bureau suggest- 
ed that reciprocity would be an appropriate 
topic. After a year of study and exchange of 
information, a second U.S./Mexico confer- 
ence was held last July in Chestertown, 
Maryland, The FCC will issue a public no* 
tice describing all procedures in the recip- 
rocal agreement when they are finaL TNX 
WSYf Report, Vol 13, Issue US. 

Soviet Goodwill Trip 

David Larsen KK4WW, John Douglas 
NilSL, and Bob Fribertshauser W6YMR, 
members of the Foundation for Amateur 

International Radio Service (FAIRS), vis- 
ited the Radio Sport Federation staff in 
Moscow last spring. The FAIRS members, 
also known as the iJ S9 Group'* were on a 
three-week goodwill mission delivering 
equipment to Soviet amateurs for emergen- 
cy digital radio communication. Nine com- 
puters, nine TNCs, two HF transceivers, 
four NTs, and three VHF transceivers were 
donated by vahous companies. FAIRS So- 
viet amateurs involved in the project were 
Victor Goncharsky UB5WE, Yuri Katuytin 
UA4LM, Helen Goncharsky RB5WA, victor 
Goiutvin UB5WPR, and Vladimir Kiebangvsky 
UB5WCV. TNX FAIRS. 



AREMIR 



This month — October 2-12 — an Austrian 
cosmonaut will operate AREMIR (Austrian 
Amateur Radio Experiment) aboard Mir, II 

will be part of a 16-expehment package called 
AUSTROMIR '91. AREMIR equipment will in- 
clude a modified Alinco DJ-120E transceiver 
for 2 meters (power limfted to 3 watts), a TNC 
and CW generator for the AREMIR beacon, 
and a laptop computer for packet. The exact 
frequency hadn't been determined at the time 
of this news release, but look for it around 
145,8-146.0 MHz. Continuous packet bul- 
letins are to be 36 characters long, with a 
six-second tone for Doppler measurements, 

AREMIR has a strong educational focus, and 
an Austrian team of hams has created a spe- 
cial receiver for Russian and Austrian schools. 
TNX SpaceNews. MCtmaif, John Magtracane. 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 7 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



The Sudden Receiver 

A simple-to-build receiver for 1 60-20M. 



by Rev. George Dobbs G3RJV 



It is sometimes said that the age 
of the amateur radio builder has 

gone. In the "great days/' there 
was a huge electronic scrap yard 
left over from World War II , and 
hams could buy cheap parts and 
equipment just waiting to be modi- 
fied for amateur radio use. They 
were good days; I remember well a 
local radio surplus store in my 
small home town in the north of 
England which had items that even 
a schoolboy could afford to buy. 
The store has now long since gone, 
and so have those bargain surplus 
items. 

But my belief is that times have 
never been better for the ham who 
wants to build his own equipment. 
The world is full of electronics; from life- 
saving equipment to novelty junk, it is around 
us all the time. Smaller components, safer 
voltages and cleaner techniques mean that 
equipment can be built on a tray on the 





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INPUT afT 

IMPUT iff 

ORQwwofT 

OUTPUT A I"*"* 



"H OSCILLATWI 

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T| OUTPUT 



TO* View 




Figure L The Signetics NE602, 

3 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



Photo. Vie Sudden receiver. 



kitchen table— and cleared away after use. 
Components have never been cheaper; com- 
pare the price of electronic parts 30 years ago 
and now, and then compare average incomes. 
It is cheaper, easier and more convenient to 
build electronic equipment than ever before. I 
suspect that motivation, rather than means, is 
why more of it is not done. 

There may not be the surplus items we used 
to find, but there is another kind of surplus 
these days. It is what I call the "scraps from 
the rich man's table/* Modern technology 
has produced many specialized components 
and items for a particular job. If they are for 
consumer applications, the high sales volume 
often means that cheap, and sometimes clev- 
er, devices can be found. These may not be 
for applications directly related to amateur 
radio, but that is the joy of the new surplus 
market. The fun is taking cheaply produced 
devices designed for special applications, and 
making them fit what we want to build. That 
is real amateur radio in action! 

In the UK there have been indications in 



recent years of a revival in home 
construction among radio hams. 
This has been shown by the popu- 
larity of the G-QRP Club and its 
little journal, SPRAT. The club has 
always leaned heavily towards the 
use of home-built equipment, and 
SPRAT has grown into an informal 
constructor's magazine. Perhaps 
part of its popularity is due to the 
number of simple construction 
projects that have been published in 
SPRAT. Many amateur radio con- 
structors in the UK have found 
their first radio project in its pages. 
I proffer all this cheerful informa- 
tion because I edit SPRAT, and for 
many years I have tried to include 
projects suitable for the beginner* 
In the past, SPRAT has contained many 
simple HF bands transmitter circuits which 
can be built in an evening with a few parts. 
These give the experience of working on an 
amateur band with a few watts of homc-gen- 
erated RF. [Ed. Note: Those in the U.S. can 
join the G-QRP dub and receive SPRA T for 
Sl2/year from Luke Dodds W5HKA at 2852 
Oak Forest. Grapevine TX 76051 . Overseas 
readers can obtain more information directly 
from the author,] 

Recently there have been requests to 
provide a very simple receiver circuit lor the 
amateur bands capable of being built by a 
first-timer and yet able to yield reasonable 
results on the amateur bands. The Sudden 
Receiver was the result of this request. 

The Sudden Conception 

The name "Sudden* 1 has nothing to do 
with the speed and ease of building this little 
radio (even though it is simple and easy to 
build); rather, it is the name of the town 
where it was conceived. 1 live in Rochdale, a 



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Figure 2. Schematic of the Sudden Receiver circuit. 



If you're living in an area with 
antenna restrictions, if you're 
tired of hassling with huge mulli 
element yagis or if you're jusi 
looking for a compact, rugged, 
easy-to-use portable antenna 
that really works, the 150 watt 
IsoLoop 10-30 (MHz) HF 
Antenna is the Perfect Solution 
to your antenna problems. 

The IsoLoop 10-30 has been 
redesigned to provide 
greater durability, lower SWR 
and extended frequency coverage. 
Because the loop is isolated 
from the feedline, your radiated 
power goes into the antenna, 
not into the shack. Efficiency 
is maximized because the new 
design has no mechanical joints 
and no assembly is required 
No ground plane or antenna 
tuner needed! 

The IsoLoop comes fully 
assembled complete with 
LC-2 Loop Controller (includ- 
ing signal strength LEDs) and 
50 feet of control cable in a 
UPS shippable package. 



T 

s 



his HF antenna goes where 
few others have gone before! 



ee the IsoLoop 10-30 today 
at your favorite AEA dealer. 

For a complete specification 
sheet on this or any other 
AEA product, call the loll-free 
AEALit-Lineai 1-80&432-8873. 






< 






\ 

1 




W^Sk Br * 


*^m 




LC-2 
Loop Controller. 



T 



Advanced Electronic Applications\Inc 

P.O. Box C2160/2006 196th St. S.W.'Lyrthwood. WA 98036-0918 
Technical Support : (206) 775-7373 Office (206) 774-5554 
-<fes (206)234-5678 CompuServe user ID 76702. 10*3 

Ail specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. 
-£A, Inc. 1991. All flights Reserve^ 












Table. Component 


Values for Different Bands 










Band 


CI 


C2 


C3 


T1 


T2 


VC1 + CIO C4 


CS C6 


T3 






160 


220 pF 


10 pF 


220 pF 


BKXN-K3333R 


BKXN-K3333R 


AH Sections + 100pF 


0.001 hf 


0.001 ^F 


560 pF 


BKXNJ<3333R 


80 


47 pF 


3pF 


47 pF 


BKXN-K3333R 


BKXN-K3333R 


All Sections + 100 pF 


0,001 mF 


0,001 pF 


560 pF 


BKXN-K3334R 


40 


100 pF 


8.2 pF 


100 pF 


BKXM-K3334R 


BKXN-K3334R 


1 Section + 47 pF 


560 pF 


560 pF 


270 pF 


BKXN-K4173AO 


30 


47 pF 


3pF 


47 pF 


BKXN-K3334R 


BKXN-K3334R 


1 Section + 68 pF 


680 pF 


660 pF 


^OpF 


BKXN-K3335R 


20 


100 pF 


3pF 


100 pF 


BKXN-K3335R 


BKXN-K3335R 


1 Section + 68 pF 


220 pF 


220 pF 


68 pF 


BKXN-K3335R 



town in the northwest of England, in an area 
called Sudden, Sudden was once a village in 
its own right, and has a line, stone-built 
Church of England church where 1 serve. I 
am the Vicar of Sudden, who just happened to 
design a simple radio receiver 

The Sudden could be described as a generic 
NE6G2 direct conversion receiver. It uses 
that fine and useful chip, plus the ever-popu- 
lar LM386 audio chip. Another requirement 
of the design was to avoid the use of hand- 
wound coils, a common source of problems 
for beginners, and incorporate commercial 
inductors. The final design used a range of 
TOKO coils, given the UK designation 

KANK . [Ed. Note: In the US. the 

TOKO prefix is BKXN-K.J These have a 
range of inductance values useful for short- 
wave applications. 

The NE602 is a fine example of the kind of 
"rich-man's scraps* we have today. It was 



originally designed for cellular radio applica- 
tions, but has found its way into many ama- 
teur radio circuits* The internal workings and 
pinouts are shown in Figure 1 . It IS indeed a 
useful device: a balanced mixer, RF oscilla- 
tor, and voltage regulator all wrapped up in 






K 



H£fc0*HQt|£ com 

p*j I& 

\ 
CI 






1* G°)?*?=Q 

1 5L . Hv i I 

/ i — nine 



sleeve cow*ect 

l*0T USES 




tip 



Figure 3. Walkman-type headphones can be 
used without changing the plug. 





Figure 4. (a) Pans layout for the Sudden Receiver and (b) the foil diagram. 
10 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



one small, 8-pin DIP package, AH the main 
workings of a direct conversion receiver un- 
der one roof! 

Circuit Details 

The circuit of the Sudden is shown in Fig- 
ure 2* It is a simple receiver having only two 
active devices and three inductors. The input 
comes via a simple attenuator, the judicious 
use of which is essential, especially on the 40 
meter version in the UK. T1/T2/C 1,2,3 form 
a bandpass filter. The band chart table gives 
values for the appropriate TOKO coils. The 
values are calculated to give a flat response 
across each band. Once the filters have been 
peaked with the coil cores, there is no further 
need of adjustment during operation. 

C7 couples the signal into one port of the 
NE602. The mixer is operated single-ended, 
which is a compromise in favor of simplicity. 
A similar design, the Neophite (QST, Febru- 
ary 1988), used a balanced configuration. In 
practice I have found that the results with this 
circuit did not warrant the extra complexity in 
obtaining a balanced input and output. 

The oscillator portion of the NE602 is 
around pins 6 and 7. Looking at the circuit, if 
it is turned sideways, experienced construc- 
tors will recognize the popular parallel tuned 
Colpitts oscillator. Tuning is by means of T3 
with VC1 and C10. The prototype receivers 
used a surplus variable capacitor which has 
three gangs of approximate values: 10 pF + 
10 pF + 20 pF. It may be possible to find a 
similar capacitor (see the Parts List), or you 
can use a single section variable capacitor. It 
is essential to use a good quality air-spaced 
capacitor. The values on the band chart show 
the values for CIO when using the prototype 
variable capacitor. With other capacitors, 
some experimentation will be required, The 
kit version of the Sudden uses the values and 
the capacitor from the table. 

The single-ended output is coupled via CI I 
to a volume control, then into the LM386 
audio amplifier. The LM386 is configured in 
as a 200 times gain amplifier with a simple 
Zoebel filter R5/C17 on the output. The au- 
dio output will drive a small speaker, but is 
designed for headphone reception, A pair of 
Walkman- type headphones are adequate for 
the receiver (see Figure 3). It saves family 
arguments if you are using in-house teenager 
headphones on the receiver. 

Figures 4(a) and (b) show the layout of the 
receiver. The receiver fits onto a printed cir- 
cuit board measuring 2" x 2". The board 
shown here has been extended to mount the 
three-gang variable capacitor used in the pro- 
totype receivers. This portion can be cut 
away to give a smaller size with the variable 
^ipacitor mounted remotely from the board. 





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Why? Because no other 300 watt 
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The MFJ-9490 gives you a highly 
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reflected power A 6-position antenna 
switch lets you setect 2 coax fines (direct 
or torn tuner), random wire or balanced 
line and buift-in dummy load. You also 
get a balun and 1 8-30 MHz coverage 

Special Inductor Switch 

The inductor switch is trie most likely 
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The MFJ-9490 gives you an inductor 
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You get a solid feel and positive click 




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uses 12 VDC or 110 VAC with MFJ- 1312. $12.95. 

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1991 MFJ Enterprises, Inc. 




MFJ . • 






Resistors 

R1 

R2 

R3 

R4 

R5 

R6 

All resistors are Va Watt 

Capacitors 

C1-C6 

C7 

CB 

09,012,013,016,017 

CIO 

C11 

C14 

015 

Coils, ICs and Misc. 

T1 ,T2J3 

IC1 

102 

SW1 

VC1 



Parts List 

1k 
27k 

1-8k 

4.7k 
15 ohm 
22 ohm 



potentiometer 

resistor 

resistor 

potentiometer 

resistor 

resistor 



See the Tab Ee 

1 00 pF capacitor 

0.01 |iF capacitor 

0.1 liF capacitor 
See the Table 

1 ,0 |iF/35V tantalum capacitor 
10 [4F/16V tantalum capacitor 
100 uF/25V electrolytic capacitor 

See the Table 

NE602 

LM3&6 

SPST switch 

Variable tuning capacitor (three 

sections: lOpF, 10pFand2QpF) 

see the Table and the note below, 



A kit of afl parts including the PC board, the TOKO coils and the 
tuning capacitor is available in the U.S. for $29,95 + $3 shipping 
from Kanga US, c/o Bill Kelsey N8ET r 3521 Spring Lake Dr., Findlay 
OH 45840 Tel (419} 423-5043, 7-11 p.m. Eastern. Kanga US will 
supply the blank PC board separately for $6 + $3 shipping. The 
complete kit is also available overseas from Kanga Products, 3 
Limes Road, Folkestone^ KentCT19 4AU, Great Britain. 

Variable tuning capacitor VC1 is also available as part # 231 1007 
from A.R.E. Surplus, 15272 S.R. 12E, Findlay OH 45840, Tel. (41 9) 
422-1558. 

The TOKO coils are also available from Penstock at (800) 736- 
7862. 



Finishing Touches 

The casing and hardware 
for the Sudden is a matter of 
individual taste. The main 
tuning capacitor does require 
a vernier drive for best re- 
sults. The input attenuator po- 
tentiometer, Rl t must have a 
linear track and can be in the 
value range of 50 to 2.2k 
ohms. Sturdy wiring is re^ 
quired for good mechanical 
stability between VC 1 and the 
board. 

Tuning up the receiver is 
very simple, A signal genera- 
tor or other low level signal 
source is helpful, but it can be 
tuned up with band signals. 
The first step is to get the os- 
cillator on to the band. This 
may be done by connecting a 
signal generator to C7 and ad- 
justing the core on T3 until the 
signal is detected, It is also 
possible to listen for the signal 
on another receiver. A simple 
wire from the receiver anten- 
na laid over the NE602 should 
be enough to pick up the sig- 
nal. The core, T3, is adjusted 
to give the best coverage of 
the band in question using 
VCL 

The bandpass Filter does re- 



quire a little more work, 1 have obtained 
surprisingly good results by simply peaking 
Tl and T2 on signals in the band, The best 
method is to feed a signal source into Ri and 
adjust Tl and T2 several times. Begin in the 
center of the band and peak Tl and T2 for best 
output. Then repeat this operation at either 
end of the band, ending finally by again re- 
peaking in the center* 

The receiver does have a conventional 50 
ohms input impedance. It is advisable with 
such a simple receiver to attempt to match the 
antenna to the receiver, A good operating 
procedure is to turn up the audio gain control, 
R4, to the point where the internal noise of 
the LM386 just becomes a nuisance and then 
use the attenuator, Rl , as the main gain con- 
trol. This is a simple receiver, and hitting it 
with too much signal will bring out its worst 
traits. 

The Sudden is capable of very surprising 
results for its simplicity. The morning that I 
am typing this text, a Sudden builder tele- 
phoned me to say he had been listening to 
VKs on SSB with a dipoie and a Sudden on 20 
meters. It is simple, it is inexpensive, and it is 
easy to build, but it certainly hears lots of 
stations. It makes a very good first receiver 
project or an ideal receiver for scouts or 
school groups. 

Build the Sudden, and enjoy! 



You can contact Rev, George Dohbs G3RJV 
at St. Aidan '$ Vicarage, 498 Manchester Rd, f 
Rochdale, Lanes, OLfl SHE, Great Britain. 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 




Sell your product in 73 Magatine Call Dan Harper 
& Louise O'Sullivan today 800-225-5083 



SEE THE SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO 

Many ATV repeaters and individuals are retransmitting 
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Numbers on your Feedback card 



A 10M Sideband 
Transmitter 



Add voice to your QRP station 

by Bruce Auld NZ5G 



Described in this artide is 
a relatively simple. VFO 
controlled, double-sideband 
transmitter with 1 watt output 
for 10 meters, It's capable of 
easy and comfortable commu- 
nications. For example, while 
this transmitter was still bread- 
boarded, with its innards 
splayed all across my station 
operating table, I contacted 
K7EVL in Wenatchie, Wash- 
ings >n, on the first call. He 
checked my signal, and he, my 
two-year-old Katie, and I had a 
merry contact. 

The sideband transmitter is 
designed for hams who arc in- 
terested in construction. It is 
also aimed at hams who arc 
neither technicians nor engi- 
neers, but who possess some knowledge of 
RF construction technique. Where possible 
I've used commonly found parts, commonly 
used values, and the smallest number of dif- 
ferent parts possible. Unless you live in a 
major city, however, you may have to mail- 
order some of them. 

This project is my distillation of the excel- 
lent work of W7ZOI and WA7MLH. whose 
projects taught me the vagaries of sideband 
generation. It employs simple, known cir- 
cuitry with no surprises. It is not single 
sideband because of the added expense and 
circuitry to filter the unnccded sideband. 
However, with plenty of room to spare on 10 
meters, this is no problem. The transmitter 
employs a manual transmit/receive scheme 
so that inexpensive microphones without 
FIT mechanisms can be used, and it is in- 
tended to be used with the ham's existing 
station receiver. 

The Circuit 

Figure 1, the block diagram, shows the 
flow of the transmitter. The whole of the 
circuit is designed in modules and intercon- 

14 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 




Photo A, A 10 meter transmitter you can build yourself ! 



nected to form a team. Constructed this 
way, it's easier to understand and crou- 

bleshoot, 



Referring to Figures 2, 3, 
and 4, the transmitter is cen- 
tered around an 11 MHz IF. 
This frequency was chosen on- 
ly because I had a bunch of 1 1 
MHz crystals on hand. Any 
convenient combination of fre- 
quencies for the IFAfFO com- 
bination can be used to reach 
the 28 MHz goal. The trans- 
mitter employs the simplest 
form of sideband generation, a 
single transformer and two 
diodes. It is fed with audio 
from the mike and its amplifi- 
er, and mixed with the 17.5 
MHz VFO signal. In order to 
place the VFO frequency as 
low as possible for stability, a 
mixing scheme was used 
(hence another 11 MHz crys- 
tal). For this purpose, the magical NE602 
was used, which is a wonderful device. This 
chip is a double-balanced mixer boasting an 



VFO ftOAAO 



r 



WL MtiOVMIMfft 40AA0 



llMHt 
KTJtt. 

DSC 



i? 



VFQ/*rtlx£fl 

6 sunt 



AMP 
Q2 



I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

1 I 

I I 

I I 



BALANCED MQQULATOfl 
IIHIU 






I I 
I I 
I I 



TRANSMIT 
MIXER S&L- 






BANDPASS F&TER 



I 
I 

nUiP/SWlTCHlWG 
I BOARD 

Iwni I 



I I 
I I 



AMP 

06 .* 



I I 



I *ATT 
QB 



ANTENNA 
SWITCH 

KETED 
VOLTAGE 



1- 



L_ 



OPTIONAL 
AMP 



I 

I 

I 

I 
I WATT OUT j 



ANTENMA 



RECEIVE 



Figure L Block diagram of how the IOmeter sideband transmitter works. 



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mi 

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FM-t, basic un ll *S,9S 

FM-2, as above bul with added mikt 
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FM-4. long nange, high power wttft 
very se nsi tive audio section, picks 
up voces to 1 away in 95 

FM 3 «7mplele unit includes case, 
battery, attach, antenna, and buJA-m 
condensor m*e Ewstent fidelity. 
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TRANSMITTER 
Min^tized with profes- 
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easily anywhere on 
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S14 91 



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FM ttroadc a5i band as 
well as targe portions 
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ovurtaa FM radio! 
FR-tkit $14.95 



SPEAKER PHONE 
Talk on me phone hands-free, great to put Ml 
shop ot shack, prata the button to a ns wer -no 
JCftjal phona needed Works same as commer 
ciai unit* TaJt trom anywhere m mom, phone 
fine p o wered no battery needed Super lor 
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SP-i S»95 Case-CSP fl£ft5 



SUPER SLEUTH 
A super sentHive am- 

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up a pin drop al 15 
feat 1 Great lor moni- 
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as general purpose 
amplifier Full 7¥V cms 
oulpul. Runs on 8 to 
15 voms, uaes a-45 
ohm speaker 
8N-9 kh S5.95 



SROADBANQ 
PHEAMP 

Very poplar senartrve 
afhpurpose preamp, 
ideal for scanner, 
TVs, VHFAJHF ngs, 
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GHz. 9 V^ 12 VEX: Op- 
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SYNTHESIZED— NO CRYSTALS TO BUY! 



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oW ng wnenyou can rnak#yoi# own lor less rt**e sometteiwitn 
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as 220 MHz. units Both have afl the tealiaes orl the h^rvpriced boeah 

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QRP TRANSMITTERS HAM RECEIVERS 



20, 30. 40. BOM 
CW TRANSMITTERS 




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Your choice ol bands 129 95 

(Speedy band OfiP-20. 30, 40 or 80> 
fclMtfiing case a knob *wt, CQRP «i295 



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ACTIVE ANTENNA 



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CIRCLE 34 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



*«v 



:r*4> 







ffj 

AMPLIFIER 



OPTIONAL 

TRIMMER 

CAP 



"MAIN TUNING 
PANEL MOUNT 
=»6 SWlHi 



Figure!. The VFO board. 



onboard oscillator. A very respectable signal 
can be developed with one of these. 

The signals from the sideband generator 
and VFO are amplified and fed into a diode - 
ring mixer module, U3. The jumble of fre- 
quencies that emerge go through a 28 MHz 
three-pole bandpass filter and a very nice 50 
mV 28 MHz signal results. From here it only 



needs to be amplified. The next two stages are 
simple class A broadband amplifiers. The 
final amplifier transistor is the well-known 
2N3553. In my unit, however, I use an inex- 
pensive alternative, an RCA 4013 that I pur- 
chase from my friendly local parts merchant 
in single lots for 89 cents each. It performs 
equally well, and I appreciate the price more 



each time I destroy one experimenting, 

The switching circuitry is designed to 
change the antenna from receiver to transmit- 
ter and to apply voltage to the amplifier chain 
during transmit periods. The NE602 VFO 
stage is free running for the sake of stability, 
but the carrier oscillator in the balanced mod- 
ulator is normally off. This stage is switched 
on during transmit periods and for spotting 
your frequency in the station recei ver. This is 
necessary because you would otherwise hear 
your carrier (though it has been suppressed) 
in the receiver all the time* These functions 
are carried out by a simple DPDT relay and 
two SPDT toggle switches, 

Construction 

The transmitter is constructed on three sep- 
arate circuit boards. Their size was chosen 
mostly at random, but I have arranged them so 
that they will fit in a Radio Shack cabinet. The 
etching pattern and the parts placement guide 
are provided in Figures 5^7, The parts place- 
ment diagrams are viewed from the compo- 
nent side. If you use doublc-sidcd PC hoards 
for the balanced modulator or the amplifier, 
be sure to rout out a space around each hole on 
the component side. I do this carefully with a 
Vi" drill bit. Single-sided material should 
work just fine for these boards, however. 

One may wonder why a single board is 
not used for this project. Briefly, I have 



12V ON S*OT / TflAWSwiT 



FROM VFD 




3AN0PA55 FILTER 



C40 

-5h 



C42 
4 t 



1— )h 



l2 



ft* 



-/C4I 



L3 



C44 
4T 



_^C43 
60 

ftf 



L4 




TO I ■ * AMP 

BOARD 



AUDIO AVP 



MIC AMP 



Figure 3. The balanced modulator/mixer board. 



16 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



Feedback 



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source — you, the reader. Articfes and 
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Feedback^ Title 

1 Letters 

2 Never Say Die 

3 QRX 

4 The Sudden Receiver 

5 A 10M Sideband Transmitter 

6 Simple Gain Antenna for 903 MHz 

7 Microprocessor Repeater 
Controller 

8 Review: Kenwood's TH-77A 
Dual-Band Walkie 

9 Low-Pass Antenna Tuner 

10 Hams with Class 

1 1 Review: The Drake R8 Receiver 

12 Homing In 

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14 73 International 

15 Above and Beyond 

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26 Dealer Directory 



NEW CATALOG 
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Big 92 page 8ft x 11 " Format 



Communications Receivers 

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MICROWAVE TRANSVERTERS 




Send 

$1tO 

ftp 



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1280 Aida Drive Dept. 73 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 

Tel 614 866-4267 



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profile housing Other frequency options in amateur band avadabte . 

SHF 900K 902 906 MHz SOmW M$l39 Burt $265 

SHf 1240K 1296-I300MHZ 10mW KilJl49 Built SSG5 

SHf 1269K 1268-1272 Oscar y«J*L IQmW KilSUO Buill $255 

SHF 2304 K 2304-2306 MHz MmW Kit $205 BuNt$325 

SHF 240 IK 2400 MHz ModeS rev Conv Kit $155 Built $255 

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SHFLOK 540-560 MHz LO. SOmW Kit S 66 

CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 

DOWN EAST MICROWAVE 

Bill Olson, W3HQT 
Box 2310, RR1 Troy, ME 04967 






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73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 17 



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Figure 4, The 1 watt amplifier and switching board, 



found that separating these stages greatly in- 
creases interstage isolation, Grounding is en- 
hanced and a greater overall stability can be 
achieved. 

I recommend that you build the transmitter 
in stages and get each stage running properly 
before you proceed to the next. Some hints 
for construction of the various modules are as 
follows: 



The VFO 

The VFO is the single most important part 
of the transmitter. If care is not taken to 
observe basic const ruction rules, the VFO 
will drift and you will be very unhappy with 
the rig. This PC board must be single-sided. 
Using double-sided board near the frequency 
determining components of the VFO will in- 



troduce unintended capacitance that's un- 
stable with temperature change, causing 
drift. One frequently overlooked component 
in this regard is the tuning capacitor. Some 
home-brewers mounted them on a small 
square of single-sided board soldered verti- 
cally on the VFO board and directly behind 
the panel-mounted vernier dial. This mount 
actually forms one wall of the VFO compart- 
ment. If you follow this method, make sure 
the wall is not made of double-sided PC 
board. Of course, if you use a small alu- 
minum box to house the VFO, this will not be 
a problem* 

LI lies face down on the boards glued in 
place after you have determined that the VFO 
is oscillating in the right place. I have allowed 
for a small trimmer for adjusting the VFO 
frequency, but squeezing together or spread- 
ing apart the turns of LI wit] also work. 
Make sure that all of the pans coming off of 
pins 6 and 7 of IC1 are mounted as rigidly 
as possible. 



The Balanced Modulator/Mixer 

The balanced modulator/mixer board is the 
easiest to build and the least critical, except 
for the bandpass filter- Simply populate the 
board with parts. The spacing I have used for 
the pads on the board may not match your 
junk box parts, but 1 encourage you to use 
what you have. Notice, however, that the 
values for the fixed capacitors in the bandpass 
fitter are rather specific. This stage is the 
most unforgiving of mistakes , and these val- 
ues must not be changed casually. If you have 
no 4.7 pF capacitor, then try a 5 pF. Like- 
wise, a 10 pF might be substituted for the 
10.7 pF unit, but beyond that type of substitu- 
tion, you may significantly affect the per- 
formance of the filter. 

Note that there is a 6 dB pad (composed of 
RIO, 11, and 1 2) at the output of the balanced 
modulator. This helps to achieve a good 50 
ohm load for the balanced modulator, and the 
same input impedance for the following am- 
plifier stage. Originally, I designed the trans- 





Figure 5 (a) The VFO foil pattern, (b) Parts pkicment. 
18 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



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CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERWCt CARD 




KgYtP +\Z FROM 0% AM P7 SWITCHING &DfcRt) 



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OUT TTJ AMP 



Figure 6 (a) The balanced modulator/mixer foil pattern, 
{b) Parts placement. 




TO AAt. M&P HP 



RECEIVER 

A«T TO- X M IT OUTPUT ■ 






JUMPER 




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R4 3 

I — R44- 

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IN FROM B-AL MQD/ MIXER B0A9& 



Figure 7 (a) The 1 watt amplifier/switching board, 
(b) Farts placement. 



mitter with such a pad at the end of the band- 
pass filter, bitf found that the circuit was 
stable enough without it. Also, I wanted the 6 
dB back! You may find that a pad at the end of 
the balanced modulator is not needed, and 
gain the energy otherwise lost heating the 
resistors. 

The boards fit nicely into a Radio Shack 
cabinet, I double-decked the balanced modu- 
lator/mixer and amplifier boards on either 
side of a 10cm by 10cm PC board. The ampli- 

20 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



fier board is underneath because all the ad- 
justable components are on the other board. 
You might consider making a cabinet of PC 
board material. It is drilled and cut easily, but 
plenty strong* If you can find a supply, you 
will save money on expensive cabinets- Done 
well, they can be lacquered or painted, and 
rival even the most professionally prepared 
cabinets in appearance, I also used a sheet of 
single-sided board as a false bottom in the 
cabinet. It helps establish a good ground plane. 



Debugging and Tune-up 

Viewed and constructed in modules, this 
rig can be assembled swiftly. Each module 
should be constructed and tested before mov- 
ing on to the next. That way, a problem can be 
eliminated before it arises. 

It is probably best to assemble this rig with 
access to a 35 MHz scope and frequency 
counter, if possible. If you are so lucky, your 
construction time will be drastically reduced. 



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Figure & Zta££ diagrams, alt bottom view. 

Being able to see a signal on the scope and 
adjust the stage in question is a big help in a 
sideband project where you are concerned 
about speech waveform. If you do not have a 
scope* do not despair. You can probably ad- 
just the transmitter a little at a time with the 
aid of the station receiver, its S-meter t and a 
sharp ear. I have adjusted RF stages this way t 
and while time-consuming, it can be done. 

Construct the VFO and confirm that it os- 
cillates at 6.5 MHz or so, Check this by 
placing the scope probe on pin 7 of IC I. 
Confirm that the crystal oscillator, Ql, and 
its associated components, are running, by 
placing the probe at pin I of IC 1 . Tweak the 
output of the crystal oscillator with its trim- 
mer capacitor. Before adding amplifier Q2, 
check to see that the product of the VFO 
frequency and the crystal oscillator is at 17,5 
MHz or thereabouts. If the counter cannot 
"sit still** on a frequency, the desired product 
is not dominant. Tweak the IC's trimmer for 
maximum output at 17.5 MHz. Adding am* 
plifier Q2 and tweaking its trimmer will fur- 
ther preselect 17 MHz and amplify it to about 
3 volts peak-to-peak. 

If you have no scope, you will have to find 
the oscillator's signal in the station receiver. 
Make sure you have the receiver's antenna 
lead close to the oscillator for adequate pick 
up. Adjust the same controls mentioned 
above for a peak S-meter reading. 

C2 sets the VFO's bandspread at about 200 
kHz. I chose 28.500 to 28 J00 MHz, but 
adding a turn or two to L 1 will lower the VFO 
frequency to the Novice portion of the band. 
Eliminating C2 will greatly increase the total 
bandspread. 

Next determine that the balanced modula- 
tor carrier oscillator, Q4, will run. It is nor- 
mally off except during spot and transmit 
periods, so you will need to temporarily ap- 
ply voltage to it through its supply line resis- 
tor, R9, Peak its output. Plug in a micro- 
phone, adjust the audio gain (trimpot R27) 
for maximum input to T5 (clockwise) and 
holler. You should hear your best Donald 
Duck voice at 11 MHz, double-sideband. 
View the sideband carrier on the scope or 
listen to your signal n your station receiver 
and adjust the carrier balance trimmers (C23 
and 24) potentiometer for the greatest carrier 
suppression. Even at maximum suppression , 
you will still hear a loud carrier in your sta- 
tion receiver. Adjusted properly, though, it 
will be undetectable by other stations. I have 
found that the audio gain trimpot is best set at 
about mid-range for best voice quality. 
Above that, significant clipping occurs. 



I, TWJST T«fO ENAMElED WiWES TWETHFR. ITS HELPfuL TO 
USE DIFFERENT C&LOftS 



A — 



6- 



A* 

— B l 



2 *FH0 THE 4..B Pttfl A*Ou**D TOttOU? THE •tlGHt MuM&ER 
Of tlinnS. X SOLltf* END B TD END A*. 



Qj 




B H ' 



SAME PROCEDURE EKCEPT TH&EE WIRES. 



t>> 



. 




Figure 9. Winding the (a) bifiiar transformer, 
and the (b) trifilar transformer. 



The tricky part of the rig is the bandpass 
filter. The jumble of products from mixing 

the balanced modulator and VFO frequencies 
are all present at its input, and you must 
preselect the 28 MHz energy, pole by pole. 
Start first at the top of L2 and rotate the 
trimmer until you find a peak of 28 MHz 
waveform. Repeat thk process at each pole. 
I have not tried this without a scope, and 
would expect this to be a rather frustrating 
pan of the assembly if done by ear through 
the station receiver. Adjust the filter without 
voltage applied to the amplifier stages. 

The rest of the circuit is broadbanded and 
not adjustble except for the lowpass filter. 
Final adjustment is made by tweaking every 
trimmer in the unit for maximum output on a 
wattmeter and spreading or compressing the 
turns on the coils in the low pass filter for 
greatest output. Take care that you do not 







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CIRCLE 265 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

22 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 





Parts List 


01,9,12,14,17,19,28,29,31,36,47, 


0-1 pF 


49,51 ,52,54,56,61 ,62,63,64 




010,15,20,21,25,26,30,48,50,53 


0.01 \if 


016,27,32,33,37,38,39,55,60 


i0^iF.i6Velec. 


011,57,58 




100pF 


02,13,18,22,41,43,45 


60 pF "button" type trimmer 


03 




10 pF or similar NPO or air variable trimmer 


C4 




100pFNPO 


05 




20pFNPO 


C6 




35 pF air variable, panel mounted 


07,8 




200 pF NPO 


023,24 




10 pF trimmer, ceramic OK 


034,35 




470 pF 


C40 




15pF 


042,44 




4.7 pF 


C46 




10.7 pF 


058 




200 pF 


R1 6,42,36 




4.7 ohms 


R32,40 




10 ohms 


R1 1,17,31 




39 ohms 


R4,7,28,35 




47 ohms 


Rt 8,4 1,39 




100 ohms 


R10 T 12 




150 ohms 


R2,6 f 9,13 r 29,34,43,45 


470 ohms 


R21 




1000 ohms 


R37.38 




10D0ohms, 1/2 watt 


R33 




1500 ohms 


R3,5,14,23,30 




2200 ohms 


R19 




3300 ohms 


R26 f 44,46 




4700 ohms 


R20,24 




22k ohms 


R1, 8.22,25 




100k ohms 


R27 




tkohmtrimpot 


R15 




lOOohmtrimpot 


L1 


24 turns, T-50-6 toroid 




L2,3,4 


1 3 turns, T-37-6 




L5,6 


8turns,T-50-6toriod 




T1,4 


Primary 33 turns; sec. 3 turns over drain end, T-50-2 toroid 


T2 


Primary 18 bifilar turns; 


sec. 3 turns over center of primary, T-37-6 toroid 


T3 


Primary 20 turns; sec. 3 turns over trimmer end, T-37-6 toroid 


T5 


1 trif ilar turns, FT-37-43 toroid 


T6,7,8 


10 bif Bar turns, FT-37-43 toroid 


D1,3 


1 N91 4 or other small signal diode 


D4,5 


Schottky diode preferabEe, but 1N9140K 


D2 


6V, 400 mW zener diode 


Y1,2 


11 MHz crystal 




U1 


NE602 balanced mixer/osc. IC 


U2 


741 single op amp 




U3 


SBL-1 diode-ring mixer 


module 


01,3,4 


MPF102FET 




Q2 


2N2222 




G5.6 


2N5l79or2N5l09 




Q7 


2N3866 




Q8 


2N3553, 2SC2028, RCA 4013. 2SC2075, or equiv. transistors 


09,10 


2N4036 PNP switching transistor 


K1 


DPDTflatpack relay 




S1 P 2 


SPOT toggle switches 




RFC1 


1 5 microhenry molded choke 


RFC2,3 


10 turns, FT-37-43 




Parts suppliers: Tanner Electronics, 1301 West Beltline Rd., Suite 1 05, Carrollton "TX 75006* Tel. 


(214) 242-8702. Contact Jim Tanner regarding availability of kits. Radiokit, P.O. Box 973, Pefham 


NH 03076. Tel. 


(603) 635-2235. Circuit Specialists, P.O. Box 3047, Scottsdale A2 85271-3047. 


TeL (800) 528- 


■1417. Blank PC boards are 


available from FAR Circuits, 18N640 Field Court, 


Dundee IL 601 18. VFO board— $4.50; balanced modulator/mixer — $7; and amplifier board — $7; 


shipping— $1 .50 per order. 






'M 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS INC. 

Emergency Operations Center 

has expanded to our new two acre facility 
and World Headquarters. Because of our 
growth, CEi is now your one stop source 
for emergency response equipment When 
you have a command t control or communi- 
cations need, essential emergency sup- 
plies can be rushed to you by GEL As 
always, for over twenty two years, we're 
ready, willing and able to help. 

Our RELM two-way radio transceivers were 
especially created for government agencies. 
When you need to talk to police, fire, ambu- 
lance, or state, federal and international 
response forces, RELM transceivers may be 
quiekty programmed for up to 48 frequencies. 
Listed below, are some of our most asked 
about transceivers. For additional assistance, 
call CEI at 313-996-8888. 

NEW! RELM" RSP50G-A 

List price $465,00/CE price $31 9.95 SPECIAL 
20 Channel • 5 Watt • Handheld Transceiver 
Frequ&ncy range: 143-174 MHz, continuous coverage. 
Wilt also toork 134-148 MHz. with reduced performance. 
The RELM R3P5Q0B-A is our most popular pro- 
grammable 5 watt 20 channel handheld transceiver 
You can scan 20 channels at up to 40 channels per 
second, ft includes CTCSS tone and digital coded 
squelch. Snap on batteries give you plenty of 
power. Additional features such as time-out timer, 
busy* channel lockout, cloning, plug- in programming 
and ISM PC compatabilrty are standard. It is F,CC 
type accepted for data transmtssion and D.O.C. 
approved We recommend also ordering the BC45 
rapid charge IVa hour desk battery charger for 
S99.95, a deluxe leather case LC45 torS48.95 and 
an external speaker microphone with clip SM45 for 
$59.95. Since this radio is programmed with an 
external programmer, be sure to also order one 
PM45 at $74,95 for your radio system. 

NEW! RELM® UC1 02/UC202 

List price S128.33/CE price S79.95/SPECIAL 

CEI understands that all agencies want excellent com- 
munications capability, but most departments are 
strapped for funds. To help. CEI now offers a special 
package deal on the R ELM UC 1 02 one watt transceiver. 
You get a UC102 handheld transceiver on 154.5700 
MHz., flexible antenna, battery charger and battery 
pack for only £79.95. \i you want even more power, 
order tne RELM UC202 Two watt transcerver for Si 14.95. 

NEW! RELM® RH256NB-A 

Ltst price S449.95, CE price S299.95/SPECIAL 
16 Channel * 25 Watt Transceiver • Priority 
Time-out timer • Off Hook Priority Channel 

The R£LM RH256NB is me updated version of the 
popular RELM RH256B sixteen- channel VHF land 
mobile transceiver. The radio technician maintain- 
ing your radio system can store up to 1 6 frequencies 
without an external programming tool All radios 
come with CTCSS tone and scanning capabilities. 
This transceiver even has a priority function. Be 
sure to order one set ot programming instructions, 
part # PI256N for $1000 and a service manual, 
part # SMRH256N for $24.95 forthe RH256NB. A 
60 Watt VHF 150-162 MHz. version called the 
RH806B is available for $429.95, A UHF 15 watt, 
16 channel similar version of this radio called the 
LMU1 5B A is also available and covers 450 482 
MHz. for onry S339.95. An external programming 
unit SPM2 for $49,95 is needed for programming 
the LMU15B UHF transceiver 

NEW! RELM LMV2548B-A 

Lis! price S423 33 CE price S209.95/SPECIAL 
40 Channel * 25 Watt Transceiver a Priority 

RBLM's new LMV2546B gives you up to 48 channels 
which can be organized into 4 separate scan areas 
for convenient grouping of cnannels and improved 
communications efficiency- With an externa* pro- 
grammer, your radio technician can re prog ram this 
radio in minutes with the PM1 OOA programmer for 
$99,95 without even opening the transceiver A 
simifar 16 channel. 60 watt unit called the RMV60B 
is available for $489.95. A low band version called 
the RML60A for 30-43.000 MHz. or the RML6QB 
for 37-50.000 MHz. is also available forS4B9.95. 



RELM* Programming Tools 

If you are the dealer or radio technician maintaining 
your own radio system, you must order 3 programming 
tool to activate various transceivers. The PCKIT01 Q for 
$1 49.95 is designed lo program almost al I RE LM radios 
by interconnecting between a MS/DOS PC and the 
radio. The PM1 OOA for $99 95 is designed to externally 
program the RMV60B, RML60 A, HML60B and LMV2548 
■5 ~ne SPM2 for $49 95 is for the LMV25B and 
LMU1SB transceivers The RMP1 tor $4995 is for the 
RMU45B transceiver. Programmers must be used with 
cau Hon and on ty by q u alitied person net beca us e incorrect 
programming can cause severe interference and dls* 
ruption to operating communications systems. 

*•• Uniden CB Radios ••• 

The Uniden line of Cihzens Sand Radio transceivers is 
designed to give you emergency communications at a 
reasonable price. Uniden CB radios are so reliable 1 hey 
have a two year limited warranty. 

PRQ31 0E-A3 Lfniden4Q Ch Portable:' MotHle CB $72.95 
PRQ330E-A3 Uniden 40 Crt Remote mount CO. . - £99.95 
GRANT- A3 Uniden 40 chan nel SSB CB mobile . S 1 52 95 
WASHINGTON-* Umdan 40 ch, SSB CB base. , . $209. 95 
PC1 22- A3 Uniden 40 channel SSB CB mobile . f 1 13.95 
PC66A A Uniden 40 channel CO Mobile $ 78 95 

PR051 0XL-A3 Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile S34 95 

PROS2QXL-A3 Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile $49.95 

PR0535E-A Untden 40 channel CB Mobile £73 95 

PROS38W-A Ufitden 40 ch weather CB Mobile S7S 95 
PHO640E-A3 Uniden 40 ch. SSB CB mobile , . $1 33 95 
PRO610E-A U^den 40 channel SSB CB Base , £174,95 

• • • Uniden Radar Detectors* • * 

Buy the finest Uniden radar detectors from CEI today. 
CARD- A3 Uniden credit card size radar detector, . . $127.95 

RD3XL-A3 Uniden 3 band radar detector , $1 24.95 

RD9GTL* A Uniden "' Passport" size radar detector. . . £89.95 
RD9KL-A3 Uniden "micro" size radar detector $107 95 
RD25-A Uniden visor mount radar detector $54.95 

Bearcat® 200XLT-A 

List price S509.95/CE price $23995/SPEClAL 
12-Band, 200 Channet • BOO MHz, Handheld 
Search • Limit e Hold • Priority * Lockout 
frestuencf range: 29-54. JIB J 74, 406-5 1 2, S0S-S56 MHz. 
Excludes B23.9B7$~849 01 2$ and 888 9875-894 J 25 MHz. 

The Bearcat 200XLT sets a new standard far hand- 
held scanners in performance and dependability 
This full featured unit has 200 programmable 
cnannels with 10 scanning banks and 12 band 
coverage. If you want a very similar model without 
the BOO MHz. band and 100 channels, order the 
BC 100XLT-A3 for only S 1 79.95. Includes antenna 
carrying case with belt loop, nhcad battery pack, 
AC adapter and earphone. Order your scanner now. 

Bearcat 800XLT-A 

List price S549.95/CE price S239.95/SPECIAL 

12- Band, 40 Channel * No-crystal scanner 

Priority control ■ Search/ Scan * AC/ DC 

Bands: 29-54, 11B-174, 406 512, 806 912 MH2. 
Now.., nothing exctudmd in the 8OG-012 MHx b*nd. 

The Uniden 800XLT recedes 40 channels in two banks. 

Scans 1 5 en an n els per second. Size 9 V*" x 4ft " x 1 2 V* . ' ' 

it you do not need the 800 MHz. band, a similar model 

called the BC 210XLT-A is available for SI 78.95. 

NEWl Uniden 1 MR8100-A 

Call 313-996-8888 for special CEI pricing 

12- Band, 100 Channel • Surveillance mc mnnmr 
Bands: 29-54. 116-1 74. 406*5 t*\ 806-956 MHz. 
The Uniden MRS 100 surveillance scanner is drHeren! 
from all other scanners Originally designed for intel- 
ligence agencies, tire departments and public safety 
use, this scanner offers a breakthrough of new and 
enhanced features. Scan speed is almost 100 channels 
per second. You get four digit readout past the decimal 
point. Complete coverage ot 800 MHz. band when 
programmed with a personal computer Alphanumeric 
designation of channels, separate speaker, backlit LCD 
display and more. To activate the many unique Features 
of the Uniden MRS 100 a computer interface program is 
available for $19.95. Due to manufacturers 1 territorial 
restrictions, the MRB100 Is not available for direct 
shipment from CEI to CA. 0R h WA, NV. ID or LIT. 

NEW! Ranger RCI2950-A3 

List price S549.95/CE price S259.95/SPECIAL 
f O meter Mobile Transceiver • Digital VFO 
Full Band Coverage • Alt* Mode Operation 

Backtil liquid crystal display * Repeater Splits 

RiT e 10 Programmable Memory Positions 

frequency Coverage 28 0000 MWz. to 29.6999 MHz 

The Ranger RGI2950 Mobile 10 Meter Transcerver 
has everything you need for amateur radio com- 
munications' The RF power control feature m the 
RCI2950 allows you to adjust the RF output power 
continuously from 1 watt through a full 25 watts 
output on USB, LSB and CW modes. You get a 
noise blanker, roger beep. PA mode, mike gain, 
digitaf VFO, built-m S/RF/MOD/SWR meter Fre- 
quency selections may be made from a switch on 
the microphone or the front panel. The RCI2950 
gives you AM, FM, USB, LSB or CW operation, For 
technical info, call Ranger at 619-259-0287. 




RELM 
LMV254S8 
Only $289.95 

OTHER RADIOS AND ACCESSORIES 

XC365-AUnjtfen Ultra Clear PlusCordless Phone , $69,95 
CT7B5S- A Untden speakerphone cordless phone Si 09.95 

BC55XLT-A Bearcat 10 channel scanner f 1 14,95 

AD10O-A Plug In wall charger lor BC56XLT , $14.95 

PSOOI-A Cigarette lighter cable for BC55XLT $14.95 

VCOOI -A Carrying case tor BC55XLT $1 4.95 

BC70XLT-A Bearcat 20 channel scanner. $15995 

BC142XL A Bearcat 10 ch. 10 band scanner $84.95 

BC1 47XLT-A Beared r 1 6 ch. 10 band scanner $94 95 
BC1 72XL A Bearcat 20 ch. 1 1 bend scanner $1 34 95 

BC177XLT-A Bearcat 16 ch \ 1 band scanner $134.95 
BC5 90 X LT- A Bearcat 1 00 Cn. 11 band scan ne r S 1 94 9 5 
BC760XLT A Bearcat lOOch, 1 2 band scanner S254.S5 
BCO02-A CTCSS lone board ioraC5&0/760XLT $54 95 
BC0O3-A Switch assembly for BC590/760XLT . $22.95 
BCB55XLTA Bearcat 50 ch 12 banc scanner $ 1 9995 

BC1-A Bearcat Information scanner with CB $129.95 

BC330A A Bearcat Information scanner $99.95 

BC560XLTA Baarcat 16 ch 10 band scanner S94 95 
BPaO^ANt-Cadtoatt. padt for BC2OO/BC100XLT $39.95 

TRAVELLER2-A Grundig shortwave receiver $69.95 

COS MO POL IT- A Gfurrdig shortwave receiver $ 1 99.95 
SATELLITSOO-A Grundrg shortwave receiver . $679.95 
SATELLIT650 Grundtg shortwave receiver, ,,,.,, $949.95 

ATS803A'A Sangean shortwave receiver. $159,95 

741 02 -A Midland emergency weather receiver. . . . $39.95 
771 1 6-A Midland OB with VHF weather & antenna. . . $66.95 
771 1 8-A Midland CB mobile with VHF weather. . . $62.95 
779 13-A Midland OB portable with VHF weather $7995 

7B30O-A Midland CB base station , , $92.95 

FBEA Frequency Direciory for Eastern US A . $14 95 
FBW-A Frequency Directory for Western USA $14 95 
RFD1 -AMI. I L. IN, KY, OK Wl Frequency Directory $1 495 
RFD2-A CT. ME, MA, NH. Rl. VT Directory $14 95 

RFD3-A DE, DC. MD. NJ. NY, PA, VA. WV D^r $14 95 

RFD4 A AL, AR, FL, GA, LA MS. NC, PR. SCTN.VI. Si 4.95 
RFD5-AAK, ID, IA. MN. MT. NE ND.OR SO, WA WY $14 95 
RF06 A CA, NV, UT. AZ HI. GU ffeq. Directory $14.95 
RFD7-AC0, KS. MO. NM. OK. TX Ffeq Directory $14 95 
PWB-A Pawpon to World Band Radio $l§ 95 

AS D- A A i rpla ne Sea n na r Di rectory $14.95 

TSG-G7 Top Secret" Reg LStry of US Gov! Freq $16 95 

TTC-ATune mon lelepriqrie calls „„,_. .$14.95 

CBH-A Big CB H an dboo^AM/FM/ Free band $14.95 

TIC-A Techniques for intercepting Com rnuntcations . $14.95 
RRF- A Railroad frequency directory ,, $14 95 

EEC- A Embassy & Espionage Communications . . $14.95 
SM H-A2 Scanner ModiMcation Handbook, Vol 2 $ 1 8.95 

LIN-A Latesl InielJIgence by James E. Tunnell $16.95 

A6Q-A Magnet mount mobile scanner antenna $34.95 

A70-A Base stalion scanner antenna . $34,95 

USAMM-A Mag mount VHF ant. w/ 1 2' cable $39,95 

ItSAK-A W hote mount VHF ant, w/ T7 cable . , $34 95 
Add $4.00 shipping ior all accessories ordered at the seme time. 
Add $15-00 shipping per radio and $4.00 per anienna 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax or supply your 
tax ID number Written purchase orders are accepted from 
approved governme nt eg enc i es an most we 1 1 r a I ed I if ms at 
a 10% surcharge for net 10 billing An sales are subject to 
avai lability, acceptance and verification Prices, terms and 
specfftcattoits are subject to change without notice. All 
prices are in US dollars Out of stock rtems will be placed on 
backorder automatically Of eguivaJent product substituted 
unless CEI is instructed diffefently A $5 00 additional hand- 
ling fee will be charged for all orders with a merchandise 
total under $50 00 Shipments are FOB CO warehouse m 
Ann Aroor, Michigan No COD'S Not responsible lor typo- 
graphical errors 

Mail orders to: Communications Electron ics7 
Box 104S, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S.A. Add 
$15.00 per radio for U.P.S. ground shipping and 
handling in the continental U.S.A. For Canada, 
Puerto FMco, Hawaii, Alaska, or AP0/FP0 delivery, 
shipping charges are two times continental U,S, 
rates. If you have a Discover, Visa, American Express 
or Maste rCard, you may call and place a credit card 
order. 5% surcharge for billing to American Express. 
For credit card order, call toll- free in the U.S. Dial 
80OUSA-SCAN. For information call 31 3-996-8838. 
FAX anytime, dial 313-663-8888 Order today. 

Scanner Distribution Center" and CEI logos are trade- 
marks of Communications Electronics Inc. 
Saie dates 3/1 5/91 -10/31/91 AD*03259i-A 

Copyright ' 1991 Communication* Electron ic* Inc. 

For more information call 

1 -31 3-996-8888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 
Emergency Operations Center 

P.O. Box 1045 £] Ann Arbor, Michigan 46106*104 5 U.S. A. 
For orders catl 31 3*996-8888 or FAX 31 3*663-8888 

CIRCLE 121 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



detune the bandpass filter such that it is prese- 
lecting a different VFO/balanced modulator 
product. I tried to avoid this possibility by 
choosing an IF far removed from 28 MHz. 
While this results in the necessity of a mixing 
scheme in the VFO circuitry, it made tuning 
the bandpass filter easy. The first attempt at 
this circuit employed a 24 MHz IF and 4.5 
MHz VFO, This sounded great in theory, but 
I had practical problems differentiating be- 
tween 24 and 28 MHz signals. 

Beware of self-oscillation. Even these 
broadband amplifiers will oscillate if over- 
driven, or if a mismatch occurs between 
stages. This will result in a waveform that 
looks like you have a carrier present in the 
signal. You may look to the balanced modula- 
tor for the problem, but you may really have 
an amplifier oscillating, I have used many 
different biasing and feedback schemes for 
Q7 and Q8, and the resistors in these stages 
should not be changed casually. While it is 
tempting to change them to obtain more 
output, you may start an otherwise stable 
amplifier oscillating madly. Experimenting 
with some of these components will show 
what a delicate balance exists in a sideband 
transmitter. 

Adjusted properly, your voice will sound 
natural in the station receiver, and the watt- 
meter will bounce merrily with your speech 
patterns, resting at zero with no speech. If 
your wattmeter shows a continuous deflec- 
tion during transmit periods, some imbalance 



oirz 



TO GNC 



IB BIFILAR 
TURNS 



TO PIN 4, U1 4 




TO C33 AND 02 



OVER MIDDLE OF TQR01Q 



B' TO PIN5 h Ul 



b) Tl 



TO CH 



to Ra e 



TOGNO B 




PRIMARY: 33 TURNS 

SECONDARY; 3 TURNS 

(T4 WOUND THE SAME WAY) 



A' TO CII ANDUI 



cm 



f A TOD 



TOM A 



d) T5 



TO T4 A 
TO MB 




-CENTERTAP TO <JZ 

B TO ceo 

PRtMARY; 20 TUHHS 
SECONDARY: 3 TURNS 

B 1 TO GNQ 
A h TO CIS 



A' TO GWO 



TO C24 ANDD5 

— T 



TOR27 



e}T6 t 7<8 BJFILAR 



^sr — — tq + 



TO COLLECTOR OF 
TRANSISTOR 




TO +12 VIA RJ7 OR R3l OR 
R3-? (AS THE CASE MAY BE ) 



TO CAPACITOR CIO OR CSO OR C53 
US THE CASE MAY BE > 



exists, Go through the adjustment procedure 
again, watching the wattmeter. You should 
have about a watt peak envelope power. In 
one version I had more, in another I had less. 
The spot function is enabled by throwing 
SI. It turns on the carrier oscillator and en- 
ables you to tune the transmitter to your re- 
ceiver's frequency without applying a signal 
to ihe antenna. Simply speak into the mike 
and adjust the frequency until your voice 
sounds natural. 

On The Air! 

Ten meters is wide open. After completing 
the breadboard version of this transmitter, I 
was immediately rewarded with an enjoyable 
1500 mile QSO on the first calh I had the 
same luck the next day. I have a modest beam 
antenna at a modest height, You will be pleas- 
antly surprised at what a watt will do on 10 
meters. While this rig will not duplicate the 
performance of the commercial transceivers , 
it performs admirably. Most importantly, it 
shows that a non-engineer and non-techni- 
cian, on a First attempt at a sideband transmit- 
ter can cook up a workable system. If I can 
do it, so can you! I welcome correspondence 
regarding this rig or any home-brew topic. 
Happy home-brewing! 



Figure JO. Winding specific toroids: (a) 72, 
(b) 77, (c) 13, (d) T5, and (e) T6> 7,8. 



You may contact Bruce Auld NZ5G at 1704 
Windsor Forest Trail, Roanoke TX 76262. 
Please enclose an SASE. 




Receive 

Weather Satell ite 

Images and Charts 

on your PC 

with Quorum*s 

Totally Integrated 

and Affordable 

Weather Facsimile 

System 



f\uonjin introduces the first 
^totally integrated system 
fur the reception of weather 
satellite images- directly un 
your persona] computer. 
Selection of HF NAFAX, 
GOES WEFAX. GOESTAP. 
METEOSAT, NO A A and 
METEOR APT (including 
satellite downlink frequency 
selection) are made under 
complete program control 
from your PC keyboard. 

The easy to learn arid use 
Menu driven program allows 
you to capture, store, retrieve, 
view and print images with a 
few simple keystrokes, [tri- 
ages can be colorized from a 
palette of up to 262,000 colors 
when using a VGA display. 

System configurations cap- 
able of NAFAX reception 
start at £399,00 while fully 

capable systems can be con- 
figured for SI 500 to S2000, 
providing professional quality 
at low prices . 

For complete information 
and a Demo Disk, call or 
write: 

Quorum Communicafions t 
Int.. 1020S. Main St Suite A, 
Grapevine. IX 76051 (817) 
488-4861. Or t download a 
demo from our Bulletin Board 
by calling (817) 421-0228 
using 2400 baud. 8 data bits 
and No parity. 




QUORUM COMMUNICATIONS 




Talk With The Knowledgeable People At 

QUEMENT 
ELECTRONICS 



We Carry A Full Line Of Popular And 
Hard To Find" ICOM Products! 



-**•. 



£*^%- ■' .*K 



'*i!*i-r *****! 



« -frirfc*' 



%zzM 



inawrfh*** 












IC-229A . . .$396 
Compact 2M Mobile 

• IC 901 A Mobile Transceiver . « $929 

• UX-39A 220 Mhz band unit $309 

• UX-49A 440 Mhz band unit „ . , $328 

• UX-29H Hi Power 2m band unit $328 

• IC970H All mode 2m 70cm base ................ $2699 

• UX-R96 Receiver unit , : , $389 

• IC-3220A Compact 2m/70cm mobile unit $579 

Since 1933, we have been providing expertise 
and quality products to generations of hams. 

If you're in the Bay Area, stop by: 

1000 SOUTH BASCOM AVE., 

SAN JOSE CA 95128 
Call Us At (408) 998-5900 



CIRCLE 24 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 132 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



24 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October, 1991 



Number 6 on your Feedback card 



Simple Gain Antenna 

for 903 MHz 

Build it for under $25. 



by Phil Salas AD5X 




Building antennas for ihe UHF 
and low microwave bands 

generally requires quite a bit of 
metal work and some tricky adjust- 
ments to get good results. How- 
ever, you can overcome some of 
these problems with a few relative- 
ly simple modifications to an inex- 
pensive, commercially available 
TV antenna. 

The antenna I used was the Radio 
Shack U-75 UHF corner reflector 
antenna (RS 15-1660), which costs 
just $16*95, It consists of one driv- 
en element and seven directors* 
(This antenna is actually called a 
* 'corner- Yagi-Uda -hybrid" anten- 
na, which is a corner reflector an- 
tenna with directors.) The trick was to match 
this antenna to 50 ohms and optimize it for the 
902-928 MHz ham band. 

The Modifications 

First* you must remove the insulated driv- 
en clement by drilling out the center rivet 
holding it in place. Next, remove the alu- 
minum elements from the insulated driven 
element by drilling out the two rivets holding 
them on. You should now be left with just the 
blue insulated piece. Now, referring to Fig* 
Lire 1(a), cut off the raised portion of this 
insulated piece with a hacksaw or band saw. 
Finally, measure 0.9 inch from the center 
hole and drill two holes for clearing #6 
screws. This completes the modifications to 
the insulator. 

Referring to Figure 1(b), cut two 1 '4-inch 
pieces of %-inch copper tubing and flatten l h 
inch of one end of both pieces. Drill a #6 
clearance hole in the flattened portion on each 
tube. Attach these two tubes to the insulator 
with two #6 screws, nuts, solder lugs, and six 
#6 washers, as shown. Next, take two #10 x 
34 -inch brass screws and insert them about 
halfway into the two copper tubes. Crimp the 
copper tubes so that the screws are snug in 



□ ) 



• 6 CLEARANCE 
HQLE5 I 2 PLCS 



#10 SCREW BOOT 
»* LONG- 2 PLACES 




CUT OFF 
fUrSED PORTION! 




• 6 SCREW- 2 PLACES 
SOLDER LUGS 

WASHERS 




I 



II* LOUG- 2 PLACES 



^/ 



JlMNfeJ^ 



^u 



l»r 



Figure I. (a) Preparation of the plastic center piece, (b) Driven 
element preparation. 



place, A type M F* TV connector 
crimping tool is excellent for this. 
This completes the driven element. 
Now, turn the screws completely 
into the tubes. 



a) 



*3 2«- 




Z3d 

JL 



i j- 



i "length 




b) 



CRIMP 




^ 



, 



3 2" LONG * IM'DIA 
COPPER TU6£ 



SOLD E Ft 



J 




Figure 2, (a) Sleeve bahm const ruction, (I?) 
Crimp the bahm and solder equal length leads 
onto ihe balun sleeve mui center conductor. 




FigureJ. Mount the driven element to the boom 
about 4.5 inches behind the first director. 



The Match 

The driven element will just be a 
simple half-wave dipole which 
should give a good match to 50 
ohms. However, the dipole is bal- 
anced and the coax is unbalanced so 
a 1:1 50 ohm balun is in order. 
Figures 2(a) and 2(b) show the con- 
struction of the balun. Use RG-8M 
coax cable (available also from Ra- 
dio Shack). RG-8M is a miniature 
RG-8 coax which has an impedance 
of 50 ohms and the same diameter as RG-59. 
The loss characteristics of RG-8M are far 
superior to RG-58 and it is a perfect fit in the 
x k -inch copper tubes. 

Referring to Figure 2(a). prepare one end 
of the RG-8M by first stripping off 1 inch of 
insulation and exposing the braid and center 
conductor. Next, measure 3.2 inches more 
and remove a x k -inch section of insulation, as 
shown. Now, cut a 3.2-inch piece of W-inch 
copper tubing and insert it over the cable, as 
shown in Figure 2(b). Overlap about half of 
the exposed braid and crimp the copper tube 
to hold it firmly in place. Using a 100 watt or 
more soldering iron or gun, carefully solder 
the tube to the section of braid. The open end 
of the tubing should be comfortably removed 
(0, 1 inch or more) from the braid and center 
conductor. Now, cover the exposed braid/ 
soldered tubing end and the entire piece of 
copper tubing with heat shrink tubing (from 
Radio Shack) and heat to shrink in place. You 
have just created a quarter-wave (3,2 inches 
at 91 5 MHz) 1:1 sleeve balun, 

Now, solder the center conductor to the 
solder tug on one of the elements of the driven 
element assembly, and solder the braid to the 
other solder lug. Keep the lengths of the braid 

73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 25 



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Figure 4. (a) Prepare the coax for the half- 
wave reference antenna, (b) Attach the sleeve 
and the RF choke sections of tubing as shown. 

and center conductor as short as possible and 
equal in length. 

At the other end of the RG-8M, add either 
a BNC or a PL-259 UHF connector. In either 
case, purchase a connector for RG-59 cable 
as it has the same basic dimensions as the 
RG-8M coax. A PL-259 with RG-59 reducer 
is the easiest connector to install. If you use 
a BNC connector, you will have to trim 
several of the center conductor strands 
from the RG-8M cable in order to insert the 
RG-8M coax center conductor into the BNC 
pin. 

Finally— The Adjustment 

To adjust the antenna, you will need a sig- 
nal source and cither an antenna bridge or an 
SWR meter. First, hold the driven element 
,: ^embiy out away from you and adjust the 
screws in no more than quarter-turn incre- 
ments for minimum SWR of less than 1 .5: L 

Now, place the driven element assembly on 
the antenna 4.5 inches behind the first direc- 
tor, as shown in Figure 3. Hold it in place 
with an 8-inch nylon wire tie (Radio Shack 
278-1652). Watch the SWR and minimize it 
by carefully sliding the driven element as- 
sembly. If necessary, adjust the screws in the 
driven elements slightly. You should be able 
to get very close to a 1:1 SWR, Now, use 
either epoxy or hot glue to hold the driven 
element assembly permanently in place. You 
could also drill a new mounting hole through 
the boom and boll the element in place. Also, 
re-crimp the copper tubing over the brass 
screws to make sure they stay put and make 
good electrical contact. 



Reference Antenna 

To see how much gain this antenna was 
really giving me, for comparison I built a 
half-wave sleeve dipole with an RF choke to 
isolate the coax from the antenna field. Fig- 
ures 4(a) and 4(b) detail its construction, 

Expose 3.2 inches of the INSULATED 
center conductor from a length of RG-8M 
coaxial cable, Unravel the braid and trim it to 
a length of x h inch. Cut two 3,2-inch lengths 
of 14 -inch copper tubing. Slip one piece over 
the center conductor and down over the coax 
cable so that the RG-8M braid is under the 
tubing. Crimp the tubing with an * h F"* type 
crimping tool to hold it in place, and solder 
the tubing to Che braid. 

Slip the other 3,2-inch piece of copper tub- 
ing over the other end of the coax cable > 
positioning it 3.2 inches from the first tube. 
Carefully remove a band of insulation from 
the RG-8M, then crimp the tube over the 
braid and carefully solder the copper tube to 
the braid. Cover the entire assembly with 
heat-shrink tubing. Finally, add either a BNC 
or a PL-259 connector to the end of the RG- 
8M coax cable. 

Attach a signal source and an SWR meter 
and snip off small increments of the center 
conductor until you have an SWR of less than 
L5:L If you overshoot, just solder an exten- 
sion wire to the center conductor and try 
again. 

Measurements 

My antenna-measuring setup consists of an 
ICOM R-7000 receiver with a Smith Design 
Spectrum Probe™ connected to ihe R-7000 
10.7 MHz IF output. This gives me a tunable 
spectrum analyzer. I use a telescoping whip 
antenna for the R-7000 receiving antenna. 
Anything will work for this antenna as you 
are just going to look at the relative difference 
between the reference antenna and the comer 
reflector. 

First, I supported the reference antenna 
about 20 feet from the R-7000. Then I con- 
nected a signal source to the reference anten- 
na and made a note of the level on both the 
R-7000 S-meter and the Spectrum Probe os- 
cilloscope output. Next, I connected the cor- 
ner reflector and made boresight gain, side 
lobe suppression, and front-to-back ratio 
measurements. My setup is fairly crude, but I 
believe thai the following figures are accurate 
to within 3 dB: 
Gain: 8 dB 

Side Lobe Suppression 

(90 degrees): 10 dB 

Front-to-Back Ratio: 15 dB 

An Inexpensive Solution 

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73 Amateur Radio Today * October. 1991 27 



Number 7 on your Feedback card 



Microprocessor Repeater 

C ontr oiler , Part I 

Add versatility to your repeater system. 

byJohnBednarWB3ESS 



Not long after publishing an article on my 
Link Controller in the December 1989 is- 
sue of QST, I realized just how many repeater 
owners needed a repeater controller they could 
home-brew on a modest budget. My first single- 
chip microprocessor repeater controller had 
been in operation for almost 10 years, Before 
offering it to others, however, I decided to com- 
pletely rewrite the software to add some new 
features. I knew that if the design were economi- 
cal, it would bring those repeater owners with 
diode matrix IDers and intermittent touchtone 
control into the 2 1st century. 




Photo A. The repeater controller consists of a 
computer board and an audio board. Shown 
above is the microprocessor board. 

Selected Features 

The heart of this controller is an 8749H single- 
chip microprocessor. To date, T am still amazed 
at how many features I was able to pack into it! 
Selecting the features required prudence, since 
the memory of the 8749H is limited to 2K bytes 
of EPROM. You couJd add external memory, 
but that would increase the size and cost of the 
finished product. It would also produce RFI, 
and you would have to mount the controller in a 
shielded box with feed-through capacitors to by- 
pass the wires. 

See Table 1 for a list of the features I selected. 
Macro capability, voice messages, reverse auto 
patch, and measurement of signal strength 
would be nice extras, but you'd spend seven to 
ten times more. The project in this article is for 

28 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



those who want an economical, easy-to-con- 
struct repeater controller with a wealth of useful 
features. 

Overview of the Controller 

The complete repeater controller consists of 
two circuit boards, one with the microprocessor 
circuits and the other with the audio and phone 
interfaces. With a modest junk box, you can 
build both of them for approximately $130. (I 
will be making the boards and programmed mi- 
croprocessors available,) The microprocessor 
board (see Photo A) has nine outputs and two 
inputs for control and monitoring. All of these 
outputs are reserved for the user; they are not 
dedicated to any specific task, 

Additional controller outputs are provided for 
autopatch, audio muting, repeater PTT, link 
PTT, and two outputs for the Link Controller 
Host PTT and Busy inputs. All user outputs are 
open collector type, able to withstand 30 volts, 
and sink 40 mA of current. The repeater con* 
troller has inputs for repeater CAS, link CAS, 
superuser, and link monitor, plus two reserved 
inputs for users to monitor things. All repeater 
controller inputs are CMOS, and offer a wide 
input voltage range to make interfacing easy. 

Command Structure 

The repeater controller has two priorities in 
the DTMF command structure: the "user" and 
"superuser" levels. None of the superuser com- 
mands can be executed when the controller is in 
the user mode, but all of the commands can be 
executed in the superuser mode. What's even 



nicer is that the owner can assign these priority 
levels to all of the 39 commands! 

In most cases, you dorVt have to use the com- 
mands to change the CW speed, key-up delay, 
and hang-time available to all users. By restrict- 
ing these and similar commands to superuser 
priority, they can not be executed unless the 
repeater controller is in the superuser mode. 

When entering a command with superuser 
priority, the superuser pin must be low. If this 
pin input is high, only the lower priority user 
commands can be executed. This input pin can 
be connected to many different sources, the sim- 
plest being a controller output . Since output # I is 
adjacent to the superuser pin , a solder ball across 
these two pins on the card edge connector will 
make the connection. 

Another interesting source for the superuser 
input is a PL tone decoder output. With this type 
of connection the control operator would turn on 
a subaudible tone to enter superuser commands. 
With this type of external control of the com- 
mand priority, the owner can adapt the repeater 
controller to whatever level of security is neces- 
sary for the environment. 

Courtesy Beeps 

When the repeater controller is in the non-link 
mode, you can choose a very short single beep, a 
short two-tone beep, or a no-courtesy beep. The 
decision to use the short single beep or the two- 
tone beep is based on whether output #9 is pro- 
grammed high or low. I use this output to signal 
repeater users on whether a repeater function is 
on or off. By using this output to control some 



BASIC REPEATER fHTERCONNECTtONS 



REPEATER 

TRANSMITTER 



USER OUTPUTS 
AND INPUTS 



COMPUTER 

BOARD 



^4- &ACXUP 



SUPER USER 



HPT PTT 



PTT 



REPEATER 

RECEWER 



AUDIO 

AUDIO 



4UDIQ IN 



CAS 



CAS IN 



REPEATS TX AUDIO 



REPEATER AUDIO IN 



SPt CAS 



CAS OUT 



MUTE OUT 



WUTC tNPUT 



AUTO PATCH Ot 



AUTOPflTCH ENftHUf 



cw audio ota 



ID INPUT 



AUOtO 
BOARD 



I 



BATTEftT 



RING 
TIP 



J 






SPEAKER 



V 



Figure L Block diagram of a basic repeater system using the repeater controller. 




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JPirJ I - 6PQ UNU- I 
HPIN 31 - GROUND 1 



■ PIN 26- AUDIO IN 



PlK 3- *5V PUT 



f-IN £*- SAT BACK-UP 



PIN 25' +12 \a 14V |M 



/7? >*V 



f?7 ^77 /77 /77 /77 "-■** /77 ,U1 

Figure 2. Schematic for the repeater controller computer board. 



function, you can let your users know the on/off 
status of the function. 

For example, you could use output #9 to turn 
the PL on and off. If you don't like courtesy 
beeps, you can simply program the courtesy 
beep delay to zero, and it won't sound during 
non-link operation! The link monitor input puts 
the repeater controller in the link mode via local 
or external control* (The repeater controller and 
hardware in this article is optimized for a re- 
peater with a single link, You can add multiple 
links, but you have to build more hardware, I 
will include this information with kit orders.) 

With this link monitor input, you can have an 
externa] device like a Link Controller turn the 
link on when a remote user wants to link into 
your repeater from another frequency. In link 
mode (linkmon input low), the computer uses an 
alternate set of courtesy beeps to let your users 
know that a link is enabled. If a user unkeys from 
the repeater frequency, a short double beep is 
sent; however, if a user unkeys from the link 
frequency, a dash-type beep is heard on the re- 
peater. This simple selection of the courtesy 
beeps during linking operation instantly informs 
the users where the signals are coming from. 

For additional flexibility, the pitch of the 
courtesy tones can be varied by changing com- 
ponents in the tone oscillator circuit (Ul 1). Fi- 
nally , if a user keys the repeater during the cour- 

30 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



tesy beep, the computer stops the tone so it won't 
interfere with conversation. 

DTMF Features 

Continuing with more features, the repeater 
controller can accept DTMF commands any- 
time , even when sending CW. When entering a 
command, the first digit must be valid for at least 
200 ms. This is done to reduce the possibility of 
the controller being "triggered" by normal 
speech- Because of this delay, a short burst of 
the initial DTMF tone will be heard on the re- 
peater, but all remaining DTMF tones will be 
muted. 

Like the Link Controller, the repeater con- 
troller DTMF commands can be executed im- 
mediately by placing a l -f ■ * at the end of a com- 
mand string. This feature can be used to control 
the repeater in the presence of other signals, or 
to string commands together. Normally, all 
DTMF tones are muted on the repeater and the 
link; however, by beginning a DTMF string 
with a * '*" all remaining DTMF tones are trans- 
mitted over the repeater and link frequencies 
until the user unkeys, 

This is useful for sending DTMF tones to a 
remote Link Controller board or some other 
external device. No need to worry about the 
initial burst of the "*" digit mixing up a remote 
Link Controller. Every Link Controller is al- 



ready programmed to ignore invalid leading 
digits! Finally, an internal timer clears the 
DTMF digit buffer if the user doesn't unkey 
within three seconds of the last digit entered. 
This timer will aid the control operator if errors 
are made when commanding the repeater con- 
troller in the presence of other signals, If an 
error is made, the control operator simply waits 
three seconds and then re-enters the command. 



Table 1. Repeater Controller Features 

•Station ED, time-out timer, DTMF touch tone 

muting 
• Nine outputs and two readable inputs for the 

user 
•Programmable CW speed, hang-time, key-up 

delay, and courtesy beep delay 
■Four-digit commands with programmable pre- 
fixes 

•Programmable CW on /off read-back messages 
•Programmable dual-priority level command 

structure 
•Disable/enable repeater transmitters, link 

transmitter, time-out timer, and DTMF decoder, 
•Autopatch and I inking features 
•Direct connect outputs for the Link Controller 

(uses commercial circuit boards and common 

parts) 
•Multiple audio inputs and outputs with audio 

gating 
•Phone interface, PL gating, and local speaker 

output 
•All software, I/O, and timers are contained in 

one chip! 



If you always thought a microprocessor-controlled 
repeater had to be expensive, LOOK AGAIN! You 
could easily spend this much just tor a controller. 

REP-200 REPEATER 

A premium repeater with autopatch and many versatile cftmf 
control features at less than many charge for a bare-bones 
repeater! 

We don't skimp on rf modules, either! Chech the features on 
R144 Receiver, for instance: GaAs FET front-end, helical 
resonators, sharp crystal filters, hysteresis squelch. 

Kit $1095; w/t only $1295! 




- Awulabie for the 2M. 220MHz, 440MHz, 902MKz bands, 
FCC type accepted (vhf and uht commercial bands). 

* Rugged exciter end PA, designed for continuous duty 

- Power output 15-18W (25W option) on 2M or hi-band; 15W on 220MHz: 10W on 
uhf or 902MHz. 

- Accessory add-on PAs available with power levels up to loow 

* Six courtesy beep types, including two pleasant, sequential, multi-tone bursts, 

* AUTOPATCH: either open or closed access, toll-call restrict, auto-dlsconnect. 

■ Reverse Auto patch, two types: auto-answer or ring tone on the ajr. 

■ DTMF CONTROL: over 45 functions can be controlled by touch -tone. Separate 
4-digit control code for each function, plus extra 4-digrt owner password. 

- Owner can Inhibit auto patch or repeater, enable either open- or closed-access 
for repeater or autopatch, and enable toll calls, reverse patch, kerchunk filter, 
site alarm, aux rcvr, and other options, including two auxiliary external circuits. 

* The cwid message, dtmf command codes, and owner- specified default parame- 
ters lor cor and cwid timers and tones are burned into the eprom at the factory. 

- Cw speed and tone, courtesy beep and tail timers, and courtesy beep type can 
all be changed at any time by owner-passwtir d-protected dtrrrf commands. 

- Many built-in diagnostic & testing functions using microprocessor. 

- Color coded fed's indicate status Of ail major functions 

* Welded partitions for exciter, pa, receiver, and controier, PEM nuts how 
covers 

* 3-1/2 inch aluminum rack panel, finished in eggshell white and blade 

* Auxiliary receiver input for independent Comro< -' cross linking repealer*. 

REP-200V Economy Repeater Krt As above, except uses C0R-4 

Controller without DTMF control or autopatch. Kit only $795. 



HIGH PERFORMANCE XMTRS & 

RCVRS FOR REPEATERS, AF & 

DIGITAL LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 

FM EXCITERS; kits 
$$&, wA $169. 2W contin- 
uous duly, TCXO&xtal 
oven options available, 
fCC type accepted for 
comi uhf & hi bands. 

- TAS1 tor 2M, 150-174. 
220MHz. 

- TA451 for uhf. 
. TAS01 for 9Q2-92SMH2, 

(Q.5W out; w/t only), 

* VHF*UHFAMPUFIERS. 
For fm. ssb, atv. Output 
from 1 0W to 1 0QW. Several models, kits starting at $79, 

FM RECEIVERS: kits $1 39. wA$189, 
. R144/R220 FM RECEIVERS for 2M« 

150*174, or 220MHz. GaA* FET front 

end, 0. 1 5uV sensitivity! Both crystal & 

ceramic if filters plus helical 

resonator front end for exceptional 

selectivity: >100dB at ± 12kHz (best 

available anywhere!} Flutter-proof 

hysteresis squelch; afc tracks drrtt. 

- R451 UHF FM RCVR, similar to 
above 

- R901 902-928lv1Hz FM RCVR. 
Triple-conversion, GaAs FET front end. 

- R76 ECONOMY FM RCVR tor 6M. 2M. 220MHz, w/o hetod res 
pfc Kits Si 29. 

* R137 WEATHER SATEUJTE RCVR for 137 MHz. Kit $129. W/t 





or 
$188. 



ACCESSORIES 




TD-3 5UBAU0IBLE TONE 

DECODER- ENCODER kit Adjustable 
lor any tone. Designed especially for 

repeaters. with remote control 
activate/deactivate provisions $24 




COfi-3 REPEATER CONTROLLER ktL 
Features adjustable tail & time-out 
timers, soJid-state relay, courtesy beep, 
and local speaker ampftfier $49 

CWID itiL Diode programmed any time 
in the field, adjustable tone, speed, and 
timer, to go with COR-3 ±— $59 




COFM - Complete COR and CWID 
ail on one board for easy construction. 
CMOS logic for low power consumption. 
Many new features. EPFIOM pro- 
grammed; specify caM 



iuMtiiii i Himm 




TP-2 TOUCH-TONE DECODER/CON' 
TROLLER kit FuJI 16 digits, with toll-call 
restrictor, programmable. Can turn 5 
functions on/on. Great for selective call- 
ing, tool ...$73 

AP-3 AUTOPATCH kit Use with above 
for repeater autopatch Reverse patch 
& phone line remote control are std $79 

AP-2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
Board k& Use with above tor simplex 
operation using a transceiver $39 




MO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR 
Run up to 1200 baud digital signals 
through any fm transmitter with full 
handshakes. Radio link computers, 
telemetry gear, etc „ . $39 



DE-202 FSK DEMODULATOR kit 
receive end of link. 



-. _ — . . — _. _._._ . — 



For 
$39 

9600 BAUD DIGITAL RF UNK5. Low- 
cost packet networking system, 
consisting of new MO 96 Modem and 
special versions of our 220 or 450 mHz 
FM Transmitters and Receivers. Inter- 
lace oSrectty with most TNC's Fast 
diode-switched PA's output 1 5 or SOW. 




GaAs FET 
PREAMPS 

at a fraction of the cost 
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LNG-(*) 

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FEATURES: 

- Very low noise: 0.7dS vhf, O.BdB uht 

- High gain: 13-20d8. depends on freq 

* Wide dynamic range - resist overload 
■ Stable: low-feedback dual-gate FET 
Opacify tuning range; 2fr3Q, 4&5&, I37~l50 t 

150*172, 210-230, 4QQ-47Q, or 800-960 MHz. 

LNW-(*) 

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ONLY $24 v», S3 9 wir*du*s*d 

* GaAs FET Preamp similaf to LNG. 
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Easily mounts in many radios, 

'Specify wrung range, 25-35, 35 55, SS-90, 
90-12O, 120- 150, ISO-ZPO, 200-770, or 4QQ-SOQ 
MHt 

LNS-H 

IN-LINE PREAMP 

ONLY $79 tm. $99 

» GaAs FET Preamp with features similar 
to LNG series, except automatically 
switches out of line during transmit 
Use with base or mobile transceivers up 
to25W Tower mounting brackets incl 
•Specify ruling range: 120-17$. 200-2*0, or 
40OS00MHZ. ■ 





wked/lested 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 

Preamps wfth 3 or 4 section hefica) 
resonators reduce intermod & cross- 
band interference in critical applications. 
MODEL HRG-(*), $49 vhf. $94 uhf. 
^Specify tuning range: 1 fat 50, 150-162, 
162*174, 213-233, 42Q-45Q, 450-470. 




RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 

Low noise converters to receive vhf and 
uhf bands on a 10M receiver. Choice 
of kit with case & BNC jacks, kit with peb 
only, or w/t unit in a case. 
Request catalog for complete listings. 
VHF Input ranges avail: 136-138, 

144-146. 145-147, 146-148; kit less 

case $39. kit w/case $59, w/t in casB 

$89. 
UHF input range* avail: 432-434, 

435-437. 435,5-437.5; kit less case $49. 

kit w/case $69, w/t in case $99. 



TRANSMITTING 



XV2 for vhf and XV4 Tor uhf. Models to 
convert TOM ssb, cw, fm. etc. to 2M, 432, 
435, and for atv. 1W output 
Kit only S79, PA'S up to 45W avaSabfeL 
Request catalog for complete listings. 



OUR 29TH YEAR? 



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Send S3 lor overseas aft mmti- for cmiaJ interest, check trader aervice. allow 3*4 week* 

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hftinN . •, . n i. * ipgi^ltMod WjHj^rrmrk , MUH9. Hllrrrir^Hu-.*, Int Al! llQNft fahOPVetf. 



CIRCLE 57 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



ID & Timeout 

The repeater controller has a fixed ID 
interval of seven minutes, and the repeater 
will ID only when nobody is talking— un- 
less the time-out timer ID is disabled. When 
disabled, the repeater wilt ID whenever the 
interval timer reaches zero (while users are 
talking). 

To save valuable memory and eliminate 
extra transmissions by the repeater con- 
troller, I did not program the controller to 
do an "end ID." This is the type of ID 
routine where, a few minutes after the QSO 
has ended, the controller sends the station 
callsign and sometimes an extra message. I 
personally like a repeater controller with- 
out lots of chatter, and that weighted my 
decision. 

To help reduce repeater key-ups caused 
by intermod bursts and dialing kerchun- 
kers, I added programmable key-up delay 
to the software. When the repeater is being 
used, the key-up delay is unnoticeable. But 
after 30 seconds of no activity, the con- 
troller switches to the programmable key- 
up delay value, which is adjustable from 
to 2.6 seconds. 

The repeater controller time-out timer is fixed 
at the legal maximum of three minutes* Before 
the repeater times out, the controller sends a 
message to the users with a station ID, If the user 
is still talking, the transmitter, link transmitter, 
and phone patch are turned off. The transmitters 
stay off until the offender unkeys and realizes his 
mistake and transmits again. 

There is no post time-out harassment from the 




Table 2. Commands 


Command Function 


P owe rup Priority 


Outputs 1 low 


User 


Output #1 high 


User 


Output #2 low 


User 


Output # 2 high 


User 


Outputs 3 Jow 


User 


Output #3 high 


User 


Output # 4 low 


User 


Output #4 high 


User 


Output U 5 tow or pufsed 


Superuser 


Output #5 high 


Superuser 


Output ff 6 low or pulsed 


Superuser 


Output #6 high 


Superuser 


Output 7 low or pulsed 


Superuser 


Output #7 high 


Superuser 


Output # 3 low or pulsed 


Superuser 


Output #8 high 


Superuser 


Output # 9 low, two tone beep 


Superuser 


Output #9 high, single beep 


Superuser 


Read input 1 


Superuser 


Read input 2 


Superuser 


Auto patch on 


Superuser 


Auto patch off 


Superuser 


Increase keyup delay 


Superuser 


Decrease keyup delay 


Superuser 


increase CW speed 


Superuser 


Decrease CW speed 


Superuser 


Increase courtesy beep delay 


Superuser 


Decrease courtesy beep delay 


Superuser 


Increase hang time 


Superuser 


Decrease hang time 


Superuser 


Disable time out timer 


Superuser 


Enable time out timer 


Superuser 


Disposable repeater 


Superuser 


Enable repeater 


Superuser 


Disable DTMF decoder 


Superuser 


EnabEe DTMF decoder 


User 


Disable link transmitter 


Superuser 


Enable link transmitter 


Superuser 


Change command prefix 


Superuser 



Figure 3. PC foil patient for the computer board. 



repeater controller; that task is left up to the 
repeater users. Of course, if the repeater is 
timed out, a control operator can enter the com- 
mand to disable the time-out timer, and the re- 
pealer transmitter will come on again, To be 
successful, the control operator must be able to 
capture the repeater receiver. The lt #" feature 
must be used. 

Autopatch 

The repeater controller phone patch support is 
basic but novel. There really isn't enough mem- 
ory to implement long distance lock-out, reverse 
patch, auto dial, or control from the phone. De- 
spite this, the controller has several nice auto- 
patch features. 

For instance, when dialing the phone number, 
all digits are muted so that repeater listeners are 
unable to hear it. Additionally, there is an input 
on the computer board that allows owners to 
customize the autopatch with long distance lock- 
out or a patch limit timer if needed. 

During autopatch calls, the microprocessor 
monitors input #2. If this input is pulled low, the 
autopatch will be terminated as if the OFF code 
had been entered from the touchtone pad. Since 
this input is scanned only when the microproces- 
sor is not sending Morse code, the external sig- 
nal will have to be latched until the patch goes off 
for correct operation. 

Due to some clever software, this input func- 
tions identically to input #1 during non-auto- 



patch periods. Therefore, input #2 may be multi- 
plexed for both functions. The above features, 
plus being able to lock out users with the super- 
user priority, should aid control operators. 

DTMF Commands 

Initially, every repeater controller powers up 
with the same set of default commands, All com- 
mands are fixed at four digits long, except the 
editing commands, which are eight digits long. 
Since the leading two digits of each command 
can be edited, unique command sets can be cre- 
ated, 

Because the repeater controller has two com- 
mand priority levels, it's not absolutely neces- 
sary to change the prefix of all 39 commands. By 
making the access to the superuser function 
unique, 30 of the commands are instantly pro- 
tected from outside parties (30 of the commands 
power up with superuser priority)- 

All commands arc listed in Table 2. along 
with the power-up priority of the command. 
Most of these commands are self-explanatory. 
The four pairs of increase/decrease commands 
simply change timing values in the software. 
The owner can use a touchtone pad to increase or 
decrease timer values in fixed increments. The 
command can be repeated to make larger 
changes. 

I chose this method for two reasons— it keeps 
the operation simple and it conserves precious 
memory. Although if s not as glorious as pro- 



32 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 




m 




Food for thought. 

Our new Universal Tone Encoder lends its versatility 
to all tastes The menu includes all CTCSS. as well 
as Burst Tones, Touch Tones, and Test Tones. No 
counter or test equipment required to set frequency - 
just dial it in. While traveling, use it on your Amateur 
transceiver to access tone operated systems, or in 
your service van to check out your customers* re- 
peaters; also, as a piece of test equipment to modulate 
your Service Monitor or signal generator It can even 
operate off an internal nine volt battery, and is available 
for one day delivery, backed by our one year warranty. 



•All tones in Group A and Group B are included. 

* Output level n^it to within l,5db over entire range selected. 

* Separate level adjust pots and output connections for each 
tone Group. 

* Immune to RF 

• Powered hy 6-30 vdc\ unregulated at 8 ma. 

• Low impedance, low distortion, adjustable sinewave 
output. 5v peak -to- peak 

* Instant start-up. 

• Off position for no tone output. 

• Reverse polarity protection built-in. 



Group A 



67,0 XZ 


91.5 ZZ 


118.8 28 


156.7 5A 


71.9 XA 


94.8 ZA 


123,0 3Z 


162 2 58 


74.4 WA 


97.4 ZB 


127.3 3 A 


167.9 6Z 


77.0 XB 


100,0 IZ 


131.8 38 


173.8 6 A 


79,7 SP 


103.5 IA 


136 5 42 


179.9 6B 


82 5 VZ 


107.2 JB 


U1.34A 


186J7Z 


85.4 YA 


110 9 22 


146 2 4E 


192.8 7 A 


88.5 YB 


II4.SZA 


151 4 5Z 


203.5 Ml 



• Frequency accunic) , ± I Hz maximum ■ 40*C to + 85°C 

• Frequencies to 250 Hz available on special order 

• Continuous tone 

Group B 



TEST-TONES: 


TOUCH-TONES; 


BURST TONES: 


60U 


697 1209 


1600 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


1500 


852 1477 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2(75 


941 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



• Frequency accuracy, ± I Hz maximum - 40°C to + 85 C 

* Tone length approximately 3(H) tm. May be lengthened, 
shonened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 

Model TE-64 $79.95 




COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800) 854-0547/ California: (714) 998-3021 




CtftCU 10 OK READER SERVICE CAM 



gramming delays in milliseconds, the result is 
identical , Also, my first repeater controller used 
this method of changing delay parameters, and it 
has worked well to date. 

Command Editing 

All of the controller commands have CW 
read-back to confirm the action, except for the 
autopatch ON command where it wouldn't make 
sense. To make the interfacing easier to the user 
inputs and outputs. I thought it would be conve- 
nient if I could control the sense of the CW 
read-back message. The power-up standard is 
omputfinput— high reads back as OFF and low 
reads hack as ON, 

If you like, you can reverse these messages 
when you're programming the prefix codes. 
Once again a simple but effective method was 
chosen to do this. To keep the standard read- 
back messages, program a K 3, 5, 7, 9, or A as 
the first digit of the prefix. To reverse the read- 
back messages, program a 2, 4, 6, 8, 0, #, or B 
as the first digit of the prefix, To eliminate the 
read-back message entirely, program a C or D 
as the first digit 

Since the "* " is reserved to pass touch tones, 
it can not be used as a valid first digit. If an ' 
is programmed as a leading digit by mistake, 
simply program a new prefix with a different 
leading digit to correct the error. 

You can program outputs #5 through 8 for 
pulsed low operation or a static (no pulse) func- 
tion. Because of 



,♦ 



■■ 



3, 5, 7, 9, *, A, or C as the second digit of the 
command prefix; and as a superuser priority , 
select a 2. 4. 6, 8, 0, #, B. or D as the second 
digit. 

To program a new prefix code into the con- 
troller, simply touchtone the following eight- 
digit sequence without unkeying: the four-digit 

change command* code, and the two-digit 

code number/* and "new two-digit prefix/ 
The software counts the number of digits en- 
tered, then checks the code number range. If no 
errors are detected, an *'R ,# will be heard when 
unkeying, to confirm the change of prefix. Re- 
member, the controller will clear the command 
buffer if you pause for more than three seconds 
between digits, If editing becomes necessary in 
the presence of other signals, just use the force 
feature *■#'" at the end of the eight-digit se- 
quence. 

All modifications to the power-up state of the 
controller are saved in the computer's RAM. 
Since the 8749H power-down feature wasn't 
usable in this design, I decided to provide bat- 
tery backup power to the entire board* Every- 
thing needed for this is on the computer board, 
including the diode switch and the charging re- 
sistor (R3) for the battery pack. The computer 
board requires approximately 223 mA , so a pack 
of seven AA NiCd batteries will keep the board 
alive for close to three hours. If longer periods 
of backup are required, you can substitute a 
backup battery with greater capacity. To allow 



the charging circuit to function properly, the full 
charged terminal voltage of the battery must be 
at least I volt less than the power supply voltage 
of pin 25 on the card edge connector. If you 
notice that your computer doesn't retain pro- 
gramming changes after power loss, measure 
the voltage across R3 to see if charging current is 
flowing into the battery under normal condi- 
tions. For those owners who have a 6 volt bat- 
tery pack lying around, a high efficiency regula- 
tor can be substituted for U5 (LM2940CT-5.0)- 
With this regulator, the terminal voltage of the 
backup battery can be as low as 6. 1 volts. Resis- 
tor R3 should be selected according to the bat- 
tery backup scheme you use. If you power the 
computer board with a 13-14 volt supply, R3 
should be 390 ohms (you can use either voltage 
regulator) when using a seven-cell AA NiCd 
pack; R3 should be 470-510 ohms if you use a 
six-cell A A NiCd pack {use the optional regula- 
tor), Sec the parts list for a good backup battery 
source. 

Computer Board Operation 

The heart of the computer board is the mi- 
croprocessor U L It controls the entire repeater 
controller. The inputs to the microprocessor are 
buffered by a 4050 IC (U6) and the outputs are 
buffered by 7407 open collector buffers (U7, 
U8 T and U9). PuUnip resistors in a SIP resistor 
pack (U10) pull all the inputs to an idle state if 
the pins aren't connected, The board uses a 555 



memory limitations, 
pulsed operation 
could only be added 
to the output tow 
commands of these 
outputs. If a leading 
prefix digit of 1,2, or 
D is programmed, 
the output will pulse 
low for 150 ms and 
then return to a high 
state. Also, these 
three digits allow the 
owner to select one 
of the three possible 
read-back messages. 
If any other leading 
prefix digit is pro- 
grammed* the output 
will behave like the 
other outputs (no 
pulses). 

I am sure this fiexi- 
bitity in read-back 
messages is wel- 
comed, as you don't 
have to invert signals 
in hardware to make 
the CW read-back 
message correct. 

Since the above 
method worked so 
well, I decided to use 
the same scheme to 
program the com- 
mand priority. To 
designate the com- 
mand as user priori- 
ty, simply select a L 

34 73 Amateur Radio Today * October. 1991 




1 


GROUND 


2 


UNKPTT 


3 


1 6 VOUT 


4 


OUT VG 


S 


out f a 


O 


OUT # 7 


7 


OUT ft 


ft 


OUT f B 


» 


AUTOPATCH OC 


10 


RPT PTT OC 


11 


MUTE OUT 


12 


RPT CAS 


13 


LINK CAS 


14 


INf 1 


16 


IN * 2 


ie 


LINKMON 


17 


SUPERUSER 


18 


OUT* 1 


10 


OUT #2 


20 


OUTf 3 


21 


OUT #4 


22 


LCHOSTPTT 


23 


CW AUOtO OUT 


24 


BAT BACK-UP 


29 


12- 14V IN 


2S 


AUDIO IN 


27 




20 




M 


LCBUSY 


30 




31 


GROUND 



Figure 4. Computer board pans placement. 



The Miniature VHF/FM 
Handheld Transceiver 

A super-compact handheld about 
half the size of a regular HT, the 
tiny DJ-F1T is a powerful com- 
munications station which fits 
literally in the palm of your hand. 

The Ni-Cd battery is an innova- 
tive design, made to charge with 
the AC desk top, drop-in charging 
stand. 

Standard on the unit are 40 
memory channels, 3-stage power 
settings, pager and code squelch 
functions, several scan options, 
and full size illuminated keypad for 
easy operation and programming. 




Ask to see AUNG) pro- 
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become familiar with our 
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ALINCO 



ALINCO 

ELECTRONICS INC 



AUNCO ELECTRONICS INC. 

438 Amapola Avenue, Unit 130 

Torrance. CA 90501 

Tel. (213) 618-8616 Fax (213) 618-8758 

Two Year Limited Warranty. 

Specifications and features are subject to change without 
notice or obligation 

CIRCLE 67 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




CIRCLE 178 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




HEIGHTS 

TOWER SYSTEMS 




Light, strong, 
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Aluminum towers, 

O Self-supporting up to 120 
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O Complete tapered and 
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o full range of manually or 

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Wr i le for broch n re gi v i o g 
dozens of combinations of 
height, weight and wind load. 

HEIGHTS 

TOWER SYSTEMS 

1721 Indian Rd. 

Lapeer. MI 48446 
Phone or fax 

(313)667-1700 






CIRCLE 284 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



oscillator circuit (U 1 1 ) to generate the CW tones 
for all IDs and messages. The resistors and ca- 
pacitors in this circuit can be changed to modify 
the waveform and frequency. To change the 
pitch of the tone for some IDs and courtesy 
beeps* the microprocessor pulls pin 31 low. Re- 
sistor R21 and capacitor C 15 form an RC filler 
for the tone oscillator, and pot R20 is used to 
adjust the CW ID leveL 

The computer board uses a DTMF decoder 
(U3) and an associated audio buffer (U4) to 
decode the DTMF tones. The gain of the circuit 
is controlled by pot R17, A filter after the op 
ampfR30» R12, C8, and CIS) rolls off discrimi- 
nator audio before passing it to the decoder chip. 
When the decoder chip thinks it detects a valid 
DTMF lone, pin 14ofU3 goes HIGH, signaling 
the microprocessor and lighting the LED DS1 . 
Occasionally this LED may flash briefly during 
normal speech. If it occurs at a high rate, the 
filter after U4 may have to be modified. 

The watchdog circuit fU2) monitors the mi- 
croprocessor and resets the computer if the pro- 
gram stops execution. Pin 4 of U2 is continually 



pulsed by the microprocessor. If the program 
stops execution, these pulses will disappear, and 
after 8™ 1 5 seconds of delay, the watchdog 
should reset the microprocessor. When this hap- 
pens, a power-up message will be sent on the 
repeater, and all default commands and parame- 
ters will be reloaded into memory. 

!t*s important to connect a DC backup source 
to the battery backup pin to protect the mi- 
croprocessor from being reset and loading the 
default parameters. Without a backup battery, 
power supply glitches may occasionally scram- 
ble both the microprocessor and the watchdog 
circuit , These cases are rare and they seem high- 
ly dependent on the transient suppression of the 
main DC supply. 

The remaining circuits on the board provide 
regulated 5 volts to the board. If the supply 
voltage drops, the backup battery will provide 
power to the board through diode Dl, Diodes 
Dl and D2 form a DC switch, and resistor R3 
charges the external backup battery. If a non- 
chargeable battery is used, this resistor must be 
removed. 





Table 3. Computer Board Parts List 


Part 


Description 


Source 


Ci 


5 pF ceramic capacitor 


Mouser 21 FK005 


C2 


20 pF ceramic capacitor 


Mouser 21 FL020 


C3,5,9 


1 ,0 liF tantalum 


Mouser 540-1 ,GM35 


04,6,7,8,10,13, 14, 






1 5,16.1 3,20,22 


0,1 uF ceramic 


Mouser 14O-CDT2R6-104Z 


C11 


47 uF. 6V tantalum 


Mouser 54CM7M06 


C12 


220 uF, 25V electrotyttc 


Mouser 140-XR35V220 


CI 7 


tOuF, 16V tantalum 


Mouser 540-1 OM 16 


C21 .23 


0.01 yF ceramic 


14OCD50Q6-103Z 


01,2 


1N4001 diode 


Mouser 333-1 N4001 


D31 


LED, any color 


Mouser 35BL501 


01 


2H2222 NPN transistor 


Mouser 51 1-2N2222 


Rt, 2,4.5,1 8,21, 29 


10k, 1/4 W 


Mouser 29SJ25Q-1 Ok 


R3 


see text 


see text 


Ho, 1 1 


100k, 1/4 W 


29SJ25D-I00k 


R9 


680k, 1/4 W 


Mouser 29SJ250-660k 


R10 


330k, 1/4 W 


Mouser 29SJ250-330k 


R12J4J5.30 


2,2k h 1/4W 


Mouser 29SJ250-2.2k 


R13 


1QMEG.1/4W 


Mouser 29SJ250-10M 


R16 


1k, 1/4 w 


Mouser 29SJ250-1k 


Rl7 t 20 


20k potentiometer, single turn 


ME323-4255P-20K 


R19 


10 Ohm, 1 or2W 


Radio Shack 271-1 51 


R28 


470 ohm , 1/4 W 


Mouser 29SJ250-470 


U1 


8749H microcontroller 


WB3ESS; see note below 


U2 


4098 IC 


Mouser 51 1-4098 


U3 


SSI202 Touchtone decoder IC 


Radio Shack 276-1 303 


U4 


LM358 IC 


Mouser 51 1-LM356N 


US 


7805 voltage regulator {see text) 


Mouser 51 1-L7805ACV 


U6 


4050 tC 


Mouser 51 1-4050 


U7,8.9 


7407 IC 


526-NTE7407 


U10 


100k. 10-pin SIP 


Mouser 266- 100k 


U11 


555 timer IC 


Mouser 51 1-NE55SN 


Y1£ 


3.57 MHz crystal 


Radio Shack 272-1310 


1 


PC board 


WB3ESS RCCB3-16-90-A 


1 


40-pin IC socket 


Mouser ME1 51 -8040 


2 


15-pin IC sockets 


Mouser15IC0i6 


1 


18-ptn IC socket 


Mouser ME151-8018 


3 


14-pinlC sockets 


Mouser 15IC0 14 


2 


8-pin IC socket 


Mouser 15IC008 


1 


TO-220 heat sink 


Radio Shack 276-1363 


1 Card edge connector 3 1 /62 (mou n ting holes) 


Digi-KeyS1312 


Alternate edge connector (no mounting holes) 


Radio Shack 276-1453 


Parts are available from: Dig 1-Key Corporation, 701 Brooks Ave. South, P.O, Box 677, Thief River Falls 


MN 56701-0677. Phone: (800) 344-4539; and Mouser Electronics, 12 Emery Avenue. Randolph NJ 


07869. Phone: (800) 346-6873. 




The computer and audio blank PC boards and a programmed 8749H microconlrofler chip are available 


for S19 each from John Bednar WB3ESS, 548 Cherryvitle Road, 


Northampton PA 18067, When ordering 


the programmed microprocessor, please include the repeater ca 


II as you want it sent, including the prefix 


(de) and suffix (/rpt) along with all spaces clearly marked. SSI 202 touchtone decoder chips are available in 


limited supply for $7. Please add $4 shipping for all orders. Foreign orders should include additional 


postage. 






If you want to progre 


m your own controller IC, the source code I 


s available in DOS format from the author 


at the above address, 


Send $10 and a formatted floppy (any size, any density). If you write the author 


requesting information, please enclose an SASE, 




For battery backup. 


an assembled 7-ce3l NiCd AA battery pack is available from Cunard Associates, 


Phone: (814) 623-7000. 





36 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 




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FAX 703-938-6911 



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CIRCLE 241 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Natural Voice Playback Board 




Repeater Identifiers 
Contest Stations 
Site Alarms 
Remote Telemetry 
Weather Stat tans 
Multiple Languages 
Emergency 
An no uji cement s 



DataVoice - DV-64 

Add a Recorded Natural Voice to your system or equipment, 
Voice vocabularies or multiple phrases up to 1 minute in a 
Natural Voice ts saved in Nan-Volaii]e E-Prom. meniyry, (If 
power is removed the recordings will not be Eusi). We'll record 
your message(s) in a male or female voice - or - you can record 
the li hrary by usi rig i he opt ion ai SDS- 1 000 de ve Impme rrt board 
on an JBM or compatible computer. 



Parallel [up lit Word Select 
500 ma Kevlint Output 
32 Kb sampling rate 
Multiple Modes 
JO sec - JO minute Timers 



8 ohm Audio output 
(400 ohm Audio output 
+9vto +14? Supply 
Sixc: 4.00" x 4.25" 
Connectors Included 



Price $■ 169.00 Single Qly (programmed) 

Palomar Telecom., Inc. 

300 Enterprise Sl Suite E 

(619) 746-7998 



Assembly and Test Instructions 

Before you begin assembly, here are some 
pitfalls to watch out for: 

1 . Don't attempt to assemble this board with a 
high temperature soldering iron or gun. 

2. If the LED DS1 is installed backwards, it 
will give you the impression that the touchtone 
decoder isn't working. 

3. Make sure resistor pack U10 is positioned 
correctly, and of the correct type (one common 
pin and the resistors internally tied to this pin). 

4. Be aware that not all the ICs are oriented in 
the same direction. 

Begin assembly by installing the 14 jumpers. 
Don't miss jumper J6; it's located under Ul , an 
IC* Follow this by adding all IC sockets. It's 
important to install a socket for Ul so that the 
chip can be removed without damage and repro- 
grammed if necessary, Next* install the voltage 
regulator and heat sink and put a little heat sink 
compound on the regulator tab to aid in the heat 
transfer. Bolt the regulator and heat sink firmly 
to the PC board, Finish the board assembly by 
adding all remaining components. 

Perform the initial testing with the ICs re- 
moved, Apply 12-14 volts to the + 12V IN and 
GROUND pins of the board, and measure the 
regulated +5 volts at pin 40 of Ul . If the supply 
voltage isn't within 0.25 volts of +5 volts, mea- 
sure the voltage drop across RI9. If this voltage 
drop is greater than 4 volts, look for a shorted 
trace somewhere on the board. Once the 
voltages are correct, remove the power and in- 
sert all ICs* Reapply power and re-measure the 
supply voltage. With all ICs installed, it should 
still be within 0.25 volts of +5 volts. 



The computer board sends a power-up ID 
whenever the computer is powered up or reset. 
This power-up ID can be used to check the initial 
operation of the computer board, Two test meth- 
ods will be given; the first requires an oscillo- 
scope and the second a voltmeter. Connect a 
scope probe to pin 23 of the board and apply 
power. While monitoring the CW AUDIO OUT 
pin, the CW power-up message should be visi- 
ble on the scope. If no tone is observed, it's 
possible that the microprocessor isn't running, 
or the 555 tone circuit is nonfunctional. The 
second test method checks to see if the mi- 
croprocessor is running. First connect a resistor 
(anything between Ik and 10k) between pins 3 
and 10 of the computer board, and attach a volt- 
meter between pin 10 and ground, When the 
board is powered up, the voltage on pin 10 
should drop to near zero volts. After 6-8 sec- 
onds, this voltage should rise to near 5 volts. If 
this doesn't happen, the microprocessor isn't 
running or U9 is faulty. 

When the above tests are successful, the 
watchdog operation should be checked. Using 
either test configuration from above, place a Ik 
resistor across the crystal terminals Yl when the 
computer is sending the power-up message. The 
resistor stops the microprocessor oscillator and 
crashes the program. Within 8-15 seconds, the 
watchdog circuit U2 should restart the mi- 
croprocessor and the power-up message should 
be sent. If using the voltmeter technique, the 
voltage on pin 10 should go back to 5 volts 6-8 
seconds after the computer is reset. 

Next month in Part II we will discuss the audio 
board and operation of the whole controller. 




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Call Directory $10 

Name Index , , . . . 10 

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CIRCLE 139 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

38 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



TOUCH TONE DECODER: 

Decodes DTMF tones from 
audio source, (tape, phone, 
radio). Displays numbers on 
LCD display, 120 Digit 
memorv. $169.00 ppd. U.S.A. 
SURVEILLANCE/- 
COUNTERSURVEILLANCEl 
catalog $5.00. 

EMCOM 

10 HOWARD ST. BUFFALO NY 14206 

(716) 852-3711 




T-2000 



Subscribe 

to 

73 Amateur 

Radio Today 

1-800-722-7790 




HF Equipment Regular SALE 

IC-7B1 Xcvr/ps/tuner/scope *Sf)ecia!% 149.00 5099 



,%' ,: : 



S i£M£# -a* 



^> /Pi 



Oft© 



?ss* PV «&k 
*tsi mi (rac 



IC-765 Xcvr/ps/keyer/tuner $2692.00 2399 



iliit ■■ 



iJJlfejfl 



Wa *- 



:■:■:■:■ ■::»■ MP VHP- 



1C-751A 9~bandxcvr/.l-30 MHz rc.„ $1699.00 1219 

PS-35 Internal power supply 219.00 2D9 9S 

FL-G3A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 59.00 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) ....... 115,00 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF] 115.00 

FL-70 2,8 kHz wide SSB filter M ~ 59,00 

IC-735 HFxcvr/SWrcvr/mic ....1149.00 B93 95 

PS-55 External power supply 219.00 2Q9 95 

AT-150 Automatic antenna tuner 445.00 39S* 5 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter . 69.00 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit ...., 64,50 

UT-30 Tone encoder 18.50 

'.• if 




IC-725 HFxcvr/SWrcvr $949.00 7SS 95 

AH-3 Automatic antenna tuner ..489.00 449 95 

IC-72B 10-bandxcvrw/6m 1299.00 1089 

HF Accessories: Regular SALE 

IC-2KL HF solid state amp w/ps ....,„ $1999.00 1719 
IC-4KL HF 1 kw amp w/ps • Special.. 6995.00 5899 

EX-627 Auto antenna selector ....315.00 279 s5 

PS-15 20A external power supply 175.00 1B9 afl 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6 pin plug 349.00 329 95 

SP-3 External speaker 65.00 

SP-7 Small external speaker 51.99 

CR-64 High stab. ret. xtal; 751A r etc 79.00 

SM-6 Desk microphone , 47.95 

SM-8 Desk mic; two cables, scan ., 89.00 

AT-500 SOOw 9 band auto ant tuner 589.00 539 s5 

AH-2 8-band toner w/mount& whip,.... 758.00 689 96 

Call for Prices or accessories 
for IC-781/765/72G/725 



?COM 



* Large Stocks 

* Fast Service 

* Top Trades 




VHF/UHF Base Transceivers Regular SALE 

IC-275A 25 w 2m w/ps • Ctoseout $1299.00 1129 

IC-275H 100w2mFIWSSB/GW 1399,00 1219 

IC-475A 25w 440 FM/SSB/CW w/ps 1399,00 1329 

IC-475H lOOw 440 FM/SSB/CW 1599.00 1399 

IC-575A 25w6/10mxcvr/ps ,...1399.00 1199 

IC-575H 25w lOOw 6/10m xcvr 699.00 1329 

IG-1275A lOw L2GHz FM/SSB/CW 1849.00 1619 




VHF/UHF FM Transceivers Regular SALE 

IC-229A 25w 2m FM/TTP mic 4423.00 369 s5 

IC-229H 50w 2m FM/TTP mic 462.00 379 95 

IG-448A 25w440 FM/TTP • Ctoseout.... 599-00 379 iS 

IC-449A 35w440FMxcvr/TTP ..563.00 399 95 

IC-1201 10W 1.2GHz FM xcvr 799.00 719** 

Dual band FM Transceivers Regular SALE 

IC-3220A 25w2m/440 FM/TTP mic $659.00 579 95 

IC-3220H 45w 2m/35w 440 FM/TTP 699.00 609* s 

IC-25Q0A 440/1.2GHzFM 999.00 869 85 

Multi-band FM Transceivers Regular SALE 
IC-901 50w 2m/35w 440MHz FM xcvr ., $999.00 S69 95 

UX-R91A Broad band receiver unit 389,00 359 s5 

UX-1SA lOw 10m unit 299.00 279 95 

UX-59A 10w6munit 349.00 329 95 

UX-S92A 2m SSB/CW module , 599.00 548* 

UX-39A 25w 220MHz unit... ......349.00 329* s 

UX-594A 430MHz SSB/CW module , TBA 

UX-1Z9A10W 12GHz unit ,.. 549.00 5G9* 5 

IC-970A 25w2m/430MHz transceiver. .2895.00 2029 
IC-970H 45w2m/430 MHz transceiver ,3149.00 2729 

OX-R96 50-905 MHz receive unit .389.00 349 95 

UX-97 1.2GHz band unit.... 999.00 B69 95 

VHF/UHF Mobile Antenna Regular SALE 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band mobile ant $39.00 

AKB-32 Trunk lip mount.. 35.00 

larsen PO-K Roof mount ..,„.. 23.00 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk-lip mount,, 24,70 

Larsen PD-MM Magnetic mount , 2875 

VHF/UHF Repeaters Regular SALE 

RP-1510 2m 25w repeater $1849.00 1649 

RP-2210 220MHz 25w repeater 1649.00 1449 

RP-4020 440MHz 25w repeater. 2299.00 2009 

RP-1220 1.2GHz lOw repeater „ ...2599,00 2269 




HandheJds Regular SALE 

IC-02AT/High Power 2m... $409.00 289" 

IC-2SA 2m HT ...,, 419,00 289" s 

ID-2SAT 2m/TTP 439.00 3I9 3S 

IC-3SAT 220MHz HT/TTP .... 449.00 299 55 
IC-4SAT 440MHz HT/TTP .... 449.00 299 9 * 

IC-2GAT 2m HT/TTP ...429.00 319 95 

IC-4GAT 440MHzmTP ......... 449.00 319 M 

IC-12GAT 1.2GHz/TTP ....529.00 329 M 

IC-W2A 2m/440HT 629,00 529* 

ds for Aircraft band Regular SALE 

A-2 5W PEP synth aircraft HT 525.00 479 9S 

A-20 aircraft HTw/VOR ■ Ctoseout 625.00 499 s5 
A~21 Navicom Plus Aircraft HT 660.00 599 95 

Call for information and Prices on 
accessories for Handholds listed above. 

W !■.■!! 




Shortwave Receivers Regular SALE 

R-7000 25MHz-2GHz receiver $1199.00 1029 

RC-12 Infrared remote controller....... 70,99 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 59,00 

TlHWOOOATVunit ...,„. 139,00 134** 

R-71A 100kHz-30MHz rcvr 999.00 86fl M 

RC-11 Infrared remote controller 70.99 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter..... ..... 59,00 

FL-B3A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 59.00 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 178.00 169 35 

EX-257 FM unit , 49.00 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer ,..59,00 

CR-64 High stabltty oscillator xtat 79,00 

SP-3 External speaker , 65,00 

CK-70 (EX-299) 12V DC option 12.99 

MM 2 Mobile mount >...„ 25.99 




R-9800 100kHz-2GHz all mode rec .. $5459.00 4699 

Top Trades! * We'll take your 
Clean Late Model Gear in trade 
toward New ICON! Equipment. 



Write or Call for our Quote Today! 




Toll Free U 



VISA 




!■ Over 34 Years in Amateur Radio 

HOURS •Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 



All Prices are subject to change without notice. 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 FAX: (414) 358-3337 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 

5710 W. Good Hope Road; Milwaukee, Wl 53223 • Phone (414) 358-0333 



AES BRANCH STORES 



a ere* ddampu gtodcg Associate Store 



*» fc »* *m i«i^wi i w ■ wi w«p CHICAGO, Illinois 6063G 

WICKLIFFE, Ohio 44092 ORLANDO, Fla. 328Q3 CLEARWATER, Fia. 34B25 LAS VEGAS, Nev. 891 0B ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 
28940 Euclid Avenue G21 Commonwealth Ave. 1898 Drew Street 1072 H. Rancho Drive 5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (216) 585 7388 Phone (407) 994-3238 Phone (813)461-4287 Phone (702) 647-3114 Phone (31 2) 631-5181 

1-800-321-3594 1-800-327-1917 No Toll Free Line 1-800-634-6227 1-800-621-5802 




HAM - CB 
COMMERCIAL 

OPERATES 

10 THRU 12 METERS 

WITH TUNER 

FIBERGLAS 

OMNIDIRECTIONAL 

BASE STATION 

ANTENNA 

• Covers far above and below 
the traditional C.B. Channels 

(for export, commercial and 
Ham band use, input 2000 
watts. PEP.) 

• The A-99 is a 1 /2 wave 
voltage fed antenna that 
incorporates our patented 
variable mutual 
transductance tuning 
system. 

•Comes in three sections. 
Easy To Assemble. 

• Entire Antenna radiates 9.9 
DBI Gain 

TWIN RING 

ADJUST-A-MATCH 

T U W 1 W O 

The A-99 features the Solarcon 
Twin Ring u Adjust-A-Match" tuning 
making it possible to tune the input 
to the antenna and obtain the 
optimum S,W.R. over a range of 
frequencies. Raising the rings 
raises the frequency and lowering 
the rings lowers the frequency. 

For More Information, 

Call Solarcon at 

1-800-445-3991, 

or send for 

information. 



1 







SOLAR 

ANTENNAS 

7134 Railroad St 

P.O. Box 1 76 

Holland, Ohio 43525 

US- PATENT §4,360.814 - 

Canadian Patent § 1,1 45.456 - 

England Patent #2,046.529 Other Patents PenrJng 





o 



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73 Review 



by Michael Geier KB1 UM 



Kenwood's TH-77A 

Dual-Band Walkie 

Super-packed with features! 



Kenwood U.S.A. Corp. 

2201 E. DominguezSt. 

Long Beach CA 90810. 

Tel (213) 639-4200, 

FAX: (213) 604-4487. 

Price Class: $600. 



To paraphrase an old song, .look what 
they've done to my walkie, Mah, Wow, 
this new Kenwood dual-bander is a true tech- 
nical marvel. Slightly bigger than the single- 
band TH-25AT, the new rig packs 2 meters 
and 440 in one handy package. OK, that's not 
big news anymore. But this rig has more fea- 
tures than I ever imagined could exist in one 
radio. That characteristic is both its strongest 
and weakest point. 

First Impressions 

The radio feels solid and well made. Unlike 
the TH-25, tt has a nice, easy-to-operate PIT 
switch. All the buttons are on the front and one 
side, making them easy to find. The LCD is 
big and shows lots of stuff, including two 
S-meters, tons of status indicators, and both 
operating frequencies at once. As on most 
new rigs, the final zero is not displayed, and 
there is just a tiny digit for a final five. The 
display on this radio has a very low contrast. 
You must look at it from just the right angle to 
feel comfortable with it. The angle seems well 
chosen for normal handheld use but, in my 
overhead-lit room, at least, holding it at the 
"sweet spot" results in glare from the room 
light, making it hard to read the numbers. As 
on the new TH-27A, the display window is 
convex and presents trie highest point on the 
face of the rig, making it a target for scratches, 

The buttons are rubber or soft plastic, and 
although many are small, they are easy to 
push and widely spaced. The dual-band duck 
antenna is completely rigid plastic on the low- 
er half, but flexible on the top half. 

The power switch is a recessed rubber but- 
ton on the side, above the PTT and MONITOR 
buttons. Being used to the traditional rotary 
switch on the volume control, I wasn't wild 
about this idea at first, but I have come to like 
it. The button is quite stiff, making it unlikely 
that it will be turned on by accident. Besides, 
you must hold It in for a significant fraction of a 
second or it won't work, further reducing the 
likelihood of accidental operation. 

On lop. there are dual concentric volume 
and squelch controls, one for each band. 
There's an oddity here, though: the main and 
subbands volume controls can be swapped 
depending on which band you are transmit- 
ting on, but the squelch controls stay fixed, tt 

42 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October, 1991 




is easy to wind up 
with VHF volume and 
UHF squelch on one 
control, with the situ- 
ation reversed on the 
other! It's not seri- 
ous, but it can be 
confusing. Since 
squelch tends to be a 
set-and-forget opera- 
tion, perhaps it would 
be better if the 
squelch controls 
were small, recessed 
knobs on the back of 
the radio. Overall, 
the rig feels like 
solid, professional 
gear in your hand- It 
has a nice, inviting 
quality to it— you just 
want to pick it up and 
talk into it, 

Pick a Feature, 

Any Feature 

Let's see . . we've 
got 42 memories. 
DTMF autodialing, 
simultaneous re- 
ceive on VHF and 
UHF (or on two UHF 
frequencies at 
once!}, CTCSS, 
DTMF paging and 
calling, Automatic Band Change, dual LCD 
S-meters t a direct DC power jack on top of the 
rig, the ability to route the two bands* receive 
audio to separate speakers, crossband du- 
plex operation, and all the now-standard fea- 
tures tike scanning, automatic and variable 
offsets, and so forth, 

Unusual features include the above- 
mentioned ability to monitor two UHF frequen- 
cies at the same time. Note that I am not 
referring to "priority" watch operation (which 
the rig also has), but to actual f ulM ime simulta- 
neous receiving. Apparently, the second UHF 
frequency is monitored through the VHF front 
end, though, because the manual warns that 
in this mode the second frequency will exhibit 
reduced sensitivity. But what the heck H it still 



Photo. The TH-77A. 
Kenwood's compact 
duai-hander 



could be useful in a major metropolitan area 
like L.A.. where UHF activity is extensive. The 
rig cannot simultaneously monitor two VHF 
frequencies; I guess the UHF front end can't 
be tricked into receiving VHF, 

Other noteworthy features include the 
DTSS, or Dual Tone Squelch System. This 
system allows you to monitor a busy repeater 
without having to listen to the chatter, yet be 
called via a three-digit DTMF sequence. Also 
available is a paging function, which is some- 
what similar to the DTSS but provides for 
both personal and group codes and also dis- 
plays the calling station's ID code. There is a 
limitation to these features, which I'll discuss 
later on. 

The LCD S-meter functions as a battery 
level meter on transmit (a nice touch), and the 
rig uses the batteries and most accessories 
from the TH-25 and '26 series. It includes a 
belt clip and two nifty covers. One slips on the 
bottom of the rig when you power It from the 
external DC jack on top and have no battery 
connected. This arrangement makes for very 
nice mobile operation, because all the cables 
exit from the same place and there is no ex- 
posed connector on the bottom. In this config* 
uration, the entire radio is about the size of a 
microphone! 

The other cover slips over the keyboard, 
protecting it from scrapes and damage. A flex- 
ible button is provided so that you can operate 
the FUNCTION key without removing the cov- 
er. By the way, the keyboard is backlit along 
with the LCD, and the lights can be locked on, 
making the rig much easier to use in the car at 
night. The lights are all LEDs {thank good- 
ness, no more incandescent bulbs), so you 
don't have to feel guilty leaving them on for 
long periods. Naturally, you wont want to do 
this when using batteries, because the battery 
Pfe will be significantly shortened. 

Bastes 

As delivered, the radio receives from 
136.000 to 173,995 MHz and 438.000 to 
449.990 MHz, and transmits from 144.000 to 
147.995 and 438.000 to 449.990. Interesting- 
ly, Kenwood's ads for the rig specify that it can 
receive 1 18—136 MHz AM (aircraft) after modU 
flcation, but there's no mention of it in the 
manual 



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CIRCLE 89 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 193 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * October. 1991 43 



MY GAP 
CHALLENGER DX-VI 

Lew McCoy, W1ICP 
CQ Technical Editor 
(March 90 Review) 

... "could actually hear sig- 
nal* that were in the noise on 
the beam. In my comparisons 
between the base-fed vertical 
and the GAP, the GAP con- 
sistently outperformed the 
base -fed qntenna. Most of my 
reports were approximately 
one &~unit better with the 
GAP. One other surprise was 
that the GAP vertical was 
quieter (less noise) than the 
two base-fed verticals. I would 
rate the GAP as a quality 
product, but even more 
important a good performer* 9 

Richard Morrow, K5CNF 
73 Magazine 
(October 90 Review) 

"another very good thing 
about the GAP antenna is that 
you don't have to tune it. 
Usually broadband antennas 
are not very efficient, but this 
one is. If t could have only 
one antenna, I would de- 
finitely rather have this one* 
The lack of lossy coils, and 
the coverage of a very wide 
part of 75 meters by an all 
band vertical, impressed me 
more than a little!" 

Kurt N. Sterba 

Wo rid radio Magazine 

(February 91 Be view) 

"These guys have solved a 
problem associated with ver* 
Heals. That is, an awful lot of 
RF is wallowing around and 
dropping into the dirt instead 
of going outward bound. How 
does it perform? Like a hot 
knife through butter. I was 
just a barefoot boy answering 
the CQ callers. They just kept 
coming back to me. POWt 
POWt POWt I am almost 
struck with disbelief myself. I 
mean, this is a vertical But 
then, it's a vertical with a big 
difference. I was indeed pleas- 
ed. If I were a whole lot 
younger and I had two of 
those GAPs phased, I'd tell 
those contest hot shots to . . . 
took out!" 



CIRCLE 172 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

44 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



There is a mod which will enable aircraft RX, 
crossband repeat, and even reception of 
some other non-ham bands, Naturally, you're 
not supposed to do it, but also naturally, the 
procedure is already floating around. When 
will they ever learn that we hams don't like 
secrets kept from us in our expensive pur- 
chases? If they didn't want us to do the mod, 
they either should have made the advertised 
aircraft band RX a standard feature or not 
advertised the capability in the first place. 

As on most of the new miniaturized walkies, 
the speaker is small and somewhat tinny, and 
there's not a great deal of audio output. It's not 
bad at home, but it can be hard to hear the rig 
in a noisy car or pickup truck. I can't fault 
Kenwood here; that's just as good as it seems 
to get from a speaker that small. The transmit 
audio is crisp and clean, as is usual in Ken- 
wood rigs- The mike is somewhere inside the 
speaker cutout, but I can't see it on this radio. 
It doesn't matter; if I talk at the speaker hole T it 
transmits fine. 

Receiver sensitivity seems good, even out- 
side the hem bands. The included dual-band 
duck antenna is something of a compromise, 
especially on VHF. but the result is certainly 
adequate. Even so, the NOAA weather station 
on 162.400 MHz comes in better than it does 
on my other HT with a single-band antenna. 
The selectivity is typical of Kenwood rigs, be- 
ing OK but not real sharp, It can be hard to tell 
when you're 5 kHz off. 

Renaissance Radio 

I love high-tech toys and T up until now, I've 
always felt that the more features, the better. 
But this rig may finally have gone loo far, No 
question about it. il does everything and then 
some. In fact, it has features IVe never even 
thought of, some of which are slick and useful, 
and others which seem pointless to me, Let's 
took at a few: 

You can select which band will be heard 
when you press the MONITOR button to open 
the squelch. There are three options: main, 
sub or both, You can change the sequence of 
some of the keys, such as the CALUC SCAN 
key, so that they perform different functions in 
different orders. You can select CTCSS inde- 
pendently on each band. In addition to the 
usual VFO scan limits, you can set VFO tuning 
limits which will prevent you from tuning the 
VFO outside them. (Since you are already pro- 
tected from transmitting out of band, 1 can't 
imagine why you'd want to do this.) You can 
select whether or not you want the rig to stay 
keyed while you manually send DTMF, even if 
you let go of the PTT. There's even a choice 
between two beeper sounds for the tone alert 
function. You can reset the VFO and memo- 
ries independently to default condition. You 
can swap the main and subbands, and also 
select full-duplex crossband operation, listen- 
ing to one band while you talk on the other! 
Using this feature, it is even possible to con- 
verse telephone-style, continuously transmit- 
ting while listening. (You'd better have a big 
battery and wear gloves, though, because 
continuous transmitting will drain it fast, and 
the rig will get quite hot.) You can select from 
eight scanning modes. And on and on 



there seems to be no limit to the hoops you 
can make this thing jump through. 

Strike Up the Bands 

Managing two bands at once makes for 
some interesting control requirements and 
possibilities. For instance, memory manage- 
ment can be handled in several ways: 

You can select a memory between zero and 
nine with one key press and then rotate the 
tuning control to get at the other 30 Or, you 
can split them into VHF and UHF, Or, you can 
select any memory with two key presses. Fi- 
nally, there's "page recall/' in which you can 
have it search through four banks of 1 memo- 
ries each, looking for any memory with the 
same digit you entered, as long as it's on the 
same band. So, if you press "4," it wilt find 
memory 24 if it is on your selected main band. 
(If it sounds complicated here, believe me, it is 
even worse in the manual. But more about that 
later.) 

Tidbits 

I noticed several interesting operating char- 
acteristics, some of which I couldn't find in the 
manual. For instance, the output power level 
setting (HIGH, MEDIUM or LOW) follows the 
band. Thus, if you set the rig to LOW while 
transmitting on VHF, and then swap the 
bands, the output indicator will revert to what- 
ever it was on the other band, and will come 
back to LOW when you swap back to your 
original band. It's a nice touch. Too bad the 
indicator, which is only active for the main 
band, is shown under the subband's frequen- 
cy on the display; making it confusing. 

The scan speed is medium, being quite a bit 
faster than that on older rigs, but nowhere 
near as fast as some other HTs, Also, as on 
most rigs, the scan stops when the squelch 
opens, which generally is not on the center 
frequency of the transmitting station, This, 
combined with the rig's only fair selectivity, 
causes the scan to stop three times on each 
station , with only the second time being on the 
right frequency, (It also makes the carrier-op- 
erated scan stop mode useless for VFO scan, 
because it will freeze on the wrong frequency 
and sound distorted.) It is a simple matter to 
examine the output of the FM detector for DC 
bias and stop only when it is zeroed in on the 
right frequency. I wonder why nobody does it; 
it would be a great improvement. 

The S/battery meter displays have 10 steps 
each but, like the TH-25. they always move 
in groups of two, so they are really five-step 
displays. 

The radio can be used as a crossband re- 
peater, but not without the modification. 
Crossband repeat is something people actual- 
ly use now and then; I wonder why they didn't 
make it standard. 

The battery saver and automatic power off 
modes can be turned on and off but not adjust- 
ed for theif time periods. The APO operates 
after 59 minutes, and there is no mention 
of the duty cycle of the battery saver, in 
general, it works well and you should only 
want to turn it off for packet, DTSS or paging 
operation. 

The tone alert starts a timer which shows 



you how long it has been since the call was 
received. 

Making the Complex. . Complex 

The problem is, the presentation ol all these 
wonderful features is truly intimidating. I fully 
realize that having so much to offer results in 
some hard choices regarding key press se- 
quences and such, but the interface as well as 
the key labeling is confusing. For instance, 
there are the AL, S.CT, M,CT, S.DT, M,DT, 
C.SEU U.CHG and UXU keys. Do you really 
expect to remember what any one of them 
does? Better mnemonics could have been 
helped. And the display shows ABC, DUP S DT, 
C7\ TX.S, L, M, R T AL, C, another M and others. 

There are various combinations of key 
presses which seem to make no sense. For 
instance, to change memory banks, you press 
the LAMP button along with a digit. Why the 
LAMP button? And you press the M key and 
then the MONITOR button (which normally 
opens the squelch) to enter phone numbers 
into the DTMF memories. The SCAN key fets 
you set codes in paging mode. And so on. I 
know I can't remember sequences such 
as these, because they have no discernable 
patterns. 

Some rigs have default settings which you 
select by holding a key while you turn the 
power on. Thrs rig has twenty of them! Most of 
them are things you won't want to change very 
often, if at all, but a few can get you into trouble 
if you forget what they do. And, while some 
have an indication on the display, some don't. 
For instance, you can change the delay time 
before the dual-tone squelch system sends its 
tones by holding the MHz key and turning the 
power on. Doing the operation twice causes 
two different beep tone sequences to sound 
as the extra delay apparently turns on and off. 
But nothing shows on the display, so I have no 
idea what is actually happening, and the man- 
ual gives no hint either, because the meaning 
of the two tones is never discussed. 

By the Book 

And that brings us to the documentation. 
Yes, it is fairly complete but, like so many of 
these booklets, it is written in Jenglish and 
contains such gems as M use of earphone 
causes no howling" ("to avoid howling, use 
an earphone 1 '); and my favorite, "During 
A. B.C. operation, being exchanging the 
bands each other" (??? no idea). There are 
plenty more of these. It's hard enough trying to 
learn a complicated rig without struggling to 
decipher incomprehensible language. 

I don't mean to suggest that you can't learn 
to use the rig from this manual; you can. But it 
is dense reading and will take awhile. To its 
credit, Kenwood has included a full set of 
schematics. But the microphone hookup dia- 
gram on page 8 of the manual shows a wire 
with an arrow going nowhere. If you're a tech- 
nical type, you can probably figure this out 
from the rest of the diagram. If not, good luck. 

A rig this complex and difficult to use needs 
a wallet-sized "cheat sheet*' card. Most new 
rigs include them, but this one does not. 

Tough as this rig is, there is a way you can 
enjoy it without killing yourseif. All you have to 



do is preset most of the functions once and 
then memorize only the subset of commands 
you will use on a daily basis. Apparently, this is 
what many hams are doing. Here is a report 
from Greg N4PSA in Miami, who has owned 
his TH-77A for several months: 

"Having purchased the TH-77A in January 
makes me the local Elmer, so I have been 
helping folks out with their questions. One 
overriding complaint from the '77 crowd is 
about the manual. Actually, all of the func- 
tions and features are described, but not 
clearly. 

"During the requisite learning stage of J 77 
ownership, I saw that the paging function 
would not work through most of the local re- 
peaters, since they mask transmitted DTMF 
tones for security purposes. Although some 
repeaters will pass the tones, they usually 
must be preceded by sequences which in- 
clude the # or * to disable the masking func- 
tion . Unfortunately, the TH-77A does not allow 
those codes to be sent; it permits only the 
digits 0-9, This limitation makes the paging 
feature inoperable in most big cities, where it 
would be most useful. 

"After familiarizing myself with the rig and 
all of its capabilities, I found that I really only 
used a small portion of the features. In the 
end, I left most of the options set up at the 
factory defaults. It sure would be nice to have 
a wallet-sized function guide card. I do like the 
rig, though. It's small, it's light, and when you 
need to make changes, the flexibility to do so 
is there, , but don't lose the manual!" 73 de 
N4PSA 

Get the Bug Spray 

Any radio this new and advanced is bound 
to have a few bugs, and the TH-77A is no 
exception. Here are some I've found, or heard 
about and verified: 

Kenwood's ads show the upper VHF fre- 
quency limit as 165 MHz. Although the radio 
actually tunes nearly to 174 MHz; the frequen- 
cy synthesizer won't lock reliably above about 
168 MHz. You can tell when it's out of lock 
because the rig beeps about once per second. 
The first time it did that, I had no idea what it 
meant, because it isn't mentioned in the 
manual. 

Several people have reported problems 
with losing all the memories if they let the 
battery get low enough to cause the display to 
flash. Apparently, once it starts flashing, the 
rig refuses to respond to the power switch, so 
you can't shut it off. Eventually, the memories 
get trashed- Naturally, there is an internal lithi- 
um battery whtch is supposed to prevent this 
sort of thing, but something goes wrong and it 
doesn't kick in under these circumstances. 
Greg advises that the cure is simple: If the 
display flashes and you don't have other pow- 
er available, remove the antenna (so you 
won't receive anything) and battery pack, and 
let the pack sit for about 20 seconds. Then put 
the battery back on. It should have recovered 
enough to let you turn the rig off. 

There's an option which lets you send either 

band out to an external speaker while listening 

to the other band on the internal one. If you 

select this option but don't plug a speaker or 

Continued on page 4 7 



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CHALLENGER DX-VI 

A unique multiband 

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GAP technology. 

The Challenger DX-VI 

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over 130KHz on 80 m 
with a VSWR under 2:1! 

It has NO . . . 

• TRAPS • COILS 

• BALUNS 
• RESISTORS 

• TRANSFORMERS 
• BASE INSULATORS 

The Challenger DX-VI 

Launches RF from a 16' 
elevated GAP, not from the 
base of the antenna. The 
antenna is PRETUNED. 
There is nothing to adjust. 
The Challenger DX-VI has 
virtually NO earth loss and 
requires only 3 wires 25' 
long which attach to the 
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eliminating the need for an 
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CIRCLE 172 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October J 991 45 



Number 9 on your Feedback card 



Low-Pass Antenna Tuner 

Match your antenna while reducing harmonics with this unique design, 

by J. Frank Brumbaugh KB4ZGC 



Most commercial and home-brew anten- 
na tuners use essentially the same 
T-circuit— two variable capacitors in series 
with the RF, and a tapped or rotary inductor 
from the junction of both capacitors to 
ground. Obviously, this circuit works well. It 
can transform a wide range of impedances to 
match the nominal 50 ohm output of modern 
solid-state transceivers over a broad frequen- 
cy range, from 160 or 80 meters through 10 
meters. 

However, it also has some disadvantages, 
It is a high-pass filter configuration and does 
nothing to reduce the amount of harmonic 
energy reaching the antenna, Construction is 
somewhat complicated in that both capacitors 
must be insulated from the cabinet. Under 
some impedance matching conditions, the set 
screws in the control knobs can ''bite" your 
fingers with RF. Also, the cost of high quality 
variable capacitors and the difficulty of find- 
ing them today is discouraging, 

There is a simple way of eliminating all 
these disadvantages while retaining the wide 
frequency range and impedance matching 
ability. This circuit is not new— it has been 
used by a few hams for years— but for some 
reason it has not received the publicity in ham 
literature that it deserves. 

The Circuit 

See Figure I , This low-pass antenna tuner 
schematic retains a simple T -con figuration. 
Now, however, the circuit forms a low-pass 
filter that reduces harmonic energy falling in 
the television channels by up to 20 dB. Only 
one variable capacitor is used, and its rotor is 
grounded, eliminating the possibility of RF 
biting one's fingers. A center-tapped induc- 
tor is in series with the RF, and the center tap 
is connected to the stator of the shunt-tuning 
capacitor. Both sections of the scries coil are 
tapped every two turns, and the taps are se- 
lected by a pair of rotary wafer switches 
mounted directly to the grounded panel. 

Theory of Operation 

Selecting various coil laps with the rotary 
switches and varying the setting of the vari- 
able capacitor, much in the same way the 
standard tuner is adjusted, changes 
the operating frequency and 
impedance transformation ratio. 
This makes it possible to tune out 
any reactance, bringing the SWR 
down to 1:1. keeping the trans- 
ceiver—and its owner— happy . 

Because one tap point on each 
switch is connected to the center 

46 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



KCVR 



n 



D'HfCT 



*MT 



i Z 



.TutUB 




m 





ci 



Figure 1. Schematic for the tow-pass anten- 
na tuner, 

tap of the inductor, it is possible to change the 
circuit from a T- to an L-csrcuit with a choice 
of inductive or capacitive input. This lets you 
use the tuner with low or high impedance 
end-fed antennas, including random wires. 
This feature, impossible to achieve with the 
standard T-circuit, is handy tor Field Day, 
and could be invaluable in emergency opera- 
tion with a makeshift antenna, 

Construction 

A shielded metal box or an enclosure made 
of printed circuit board material should be 
used. However, this tuner will function 
equally well "in the open" on a breadboard. 
Because this unit is designed for the 3-30 
MHz range, lead lengths are relatively unim- 
portant, 

A single length of air-wound inductor 
(Barker & Williamson or Airdux) with a total 
inductance of 35 to 40 |lH , or a pair of tapped 
toroids (T 106-2 or equivalent) will work 
equally well in this circuit. Both coil stock or 
toroid cores should be chosen with the power 
level of your rig in mind, of course. I use a 
Kenwood TS-440S M barefoot," so 1 chose a 
"50 watt. 80 meter" plug-in coil of the 5-pin 
type common in the 1940s and 1950s, which 1 
found at a hamfest for 50c, It has an indue- 





Paris List 


ci 


100 to 150 pF variable capacitor, 0,05" spacing. 


J1 f J2 


S0239 or other RF connector. 


L1 


35-40 jjH coil, center-lapped. 


S1 


DPOT toggle switch. 


S2,S3 


Single pole, 1 1 -position ceramic wafer switch, shorting 




contacts 



tance of about 17 \Hi each side of the center 
tap— 34 |iH total. It is tapped every two turns. 

The shuni-uining capacitor should have a 
plate spacing of at least 0.05 * for use with the 
usual 100 watt transceiver. The two wafer 
switches are ceramic, single pole, 1 Imposi- 
tion, with shorting contacts. I used a surplus 
140 pF tuning capacitor from a BC-610 tun- 
ing unit, another hamfest prize purchase. 
However, a 100 pF capacitor should be suffi- 
cient. 

The parts layout can be whatever the 
builder prefers, though the logical arrange- 
ment is to mount the wafer switches in a 
horizontal line on the panel, with the capaci- 
tor mounted between them, or slightly above 
or below the wafer switches. 

A miniature DPDT toggle switch, rated 6 
amperes at 120 VAC. is included for ease in 
insening or bypassing the tuner in the trans- 
mission line. This is not required, but it elimi- 
nates unscrewing and rescrewing a lot of 
coaxial jumper cables when changing from 
using the tuner to feeding the transmission 
line directly. 

Finding the Parts 

Check out your junk box. Ask local hams 
and at your next ham club meeting. Scrounge 
the flea markets at hamfests. These are the 
cheapest ways of getting the coil and capaci- 
tor. 

If all else fails, suitable air-wound induc- 
tors are available from Surplus Sales of Ne- 
braska, 1315 Janes, Omaha NE 68102, Suit- 
able variable capacitors are available from 
Fair Radio Sales, P.O. Box 1105, Lima OH 
45802. Radio Shack and numerous mail or- 
der electronic parts dealers can supply a 
metal enclosure, knobs, wafer switches and 
RF connectors, Badiokit, P.O. Box 973 . Pel- 
ham NH 03076 (603) 635-2235 is another 
good source of wafer switches, coils (B & W 
Airdux series) and large variable capacitors. 
The capacitor plate spacing and the size of 
the coil will depend on the amount of power 
you wish to run through the tuner. For exam- 
ple: If vou are running under 100 watts try 
using Radiokit coil # 1606T or 1608T (2 H 
diameter B & W Airdux) and variable capaci- 
tor #21140 (Millen) or #149-6-1 

(Cardwell), 

Operation 

Connect the low T -pass antenna 
tuner between the antenna trans- 
mission line and an SWR meter 

which is connected to the output of 

your transceiver. Set CI to half 

Continued on page 73 



Continued from page 45 

earphone in, the "external" band does not 
revert back to the internal speaker, It just 
disappears! The rig was set to this mode 
when I got it and f thought one band was 
broken. It took me quite awhile to unravel the 
mystery. 

Suggestions 

The SHIFT/REVERSE button should have 
its functions exchanged, so that reverse could 
be selected with one key press. You don't 
change the shifts all that often anyway, so it 
would be fine for them to require use of the 
FUNCTION key. 

1 doubt the "one-upmanship" trend of cram- 
ming more and more digital features into 
walkies is going to go away, but they can be 
made easier to use. A rig this versatile could 
use a better display system. 

The next logical step is a dot-matrix, 
scrollable menu display like those found on 
pocket computers. That, along with a better- 
organized control sequence, would go a long 
way toward making a nifty radio like this one a 
joy to operate. At the very least, a "set" mode, 
in which an the rarely-changed default set- 
tings are grouped, would be useful 

Conclusion 

All in all, this is the slickest dual-bander I 
have yet used. Jt feels good, works well, and 
has more features than I will ever need. This is 
a premium rig for those desiring the utmost in 
versatility, If you're in the market for a dual- 
bander, check it out. With an improved user 
interface, it could be close to ideal for every- 
body. 



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A MS WITH CLASS 



Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors, Inc. 

P.O. Box 131646 

Staten Island NY 10313-0006 

Sacred Heart Amateur Radio Club 

In April 1991, f had the pleasure of 
meeting in person with Dave Novak 
N&DN at the Dayton Hamvention, He 
and his students had checked into the 
CO Ail Schools Net several times, and 
we had exchanged interesting tapes, 
pictures, and fetters between our two 
groups. Our meeting at the Hamven- 
tion convinced me that the work of 
Dave and his amateur radio cfub stu- 
dents could serve as a wonderful inspi- 
ration to other instructors. The follow- 
ing is Dave's write-up about how he 
organized this exciting program for 
young people. 

De Dave Novak N0DN 

I have been licensed since I was in 
7th grade My primary mentor was my 
dad, Joe Novak W0PGL As a teacher 
and youth minister, I began working 
with junior high students about 14 
years ago. My work with them in techni- 
cal areas began when I was at a school 
that had a variety show for students, 
parents, and friends. I began training 
students in taking still photos, taping 
videos, and operating sound and light- 
ing equipment At the next school, I 
formed a club called the 'Media Club," 
which got the youth involved in com- 
puters as well as photography. 

Being a "teenage" (ordained 13 
years ago!) diocesan priest, I get 
moved around every few years by the 
bishop, and I've formed clubs at each 
school. However, I never did try to in- 
terest kids in amateur radio. I believed 
up until recently that it would be too 
hard for junior high kids to team Morse 
code, and that it would be too expen- 
sive a hobby for the general public. I 
thought to myself: "ft is different if a 
parent is a ham and one of the children 
get interested, but 'normal' parents 
just wouldn't understand!" 

To be quite honest, my own interest 
in the hobby had begun to wane. Al- 
though at every new assignment i did 



manage to get antennas up t I often 
went for weeks without getting on the 
air. Months would go by without my 
going to any ham club meetings or 
hamfests. 

With the Help of an Earthquake 

Then while at the rectory on the night 
of the big earthquake in the Bay area, 
my phone began to hng. Three people 
called and asked if I could find out 
about their loved ones. To my surprise, 
after only a couple of hours on the air I 
was able to find out that all three 
parties were alive and well. Perhaps for 
the first time in my long amateur career 
(30 years this fall I), I began to realize 
what a vital service our hobby can 
provide. I think that night was a turning 
point for me. Shortly after that, I began 
getting on the air more frequently and 
going to ham club meetings, break- 
fasts, and hamfests. 

Soon after that, I was moved to my 
present QTH. Since it was in the mid- 
dle of winter, I only put up a temporary 
antenna. Then in the spring, I put up 
the tower. 

While the maintenance man, Ed 
Gilmore, helped me level the newly 
poured cement for the tower , some stu- 
dents passed by and wanted to put 
their initials in the wet cement. I en- 
couraged them! Over 100 kids wrote 
their initials, a couple made hand 
prints, and one girl made an impres- 
sion of her foot. 

The next week I set up a station in 
one of the classrooms, and arranged 
for each cfcass (grades 5 through 8) to 
come in for a demonstration. I printed 
up a flyer with photos of myself as a 
young ham The flyer stated that there 
would be a l, ham radio camp" during 
the summer. No 8th graders signed up. 
No 7th graders signed up. No 6th 
graders, either! Only one 5th grade boy 
and two 5th grade girls expressed an 
interest. 

At first I was quite disappointed, But J 
thought; J, l didn't get my license till I 
was in the 7th grade, even with my dad 
being a ham. How can these 5th 
graders possibly get their licenses? 
What the heck— I'll give it a try!" 





Pnofo R (Left to right:) Jenny Ebert KB&tYT, Vanessa Gomez KB&IXY, Amy Rosa 
KB0iRf f Angle Fischer KBQHXY t Dave Novak N&DN, and Mary Ellen Federhofer 
KBQHWN. 



Photo A. KB0HWN checking into the Ait Schools Net during her lunch period, 

48 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



I began by getting them Tune in the 
World kits, and encouraged them to 
listen to the code tapes. When the 
camp actually began in Jufy t two more 
boys showed up. I soil cited the help of 
a ham friend of mine who was free dur- 
ing the day, and also the help of two 
teenage hams. We met Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. till 
noon for two weeks. During this time 
we studied rules and theory, practiced 
code, and built code oscillators. Also, 
one morning we took a "field trip" to 
visit another local ham. By the end of 
camp, 4 out of 5 students passed the 
written test, but none were able to copy 
the 5 wpm code. 

More Students Join the Club 

In September, to my surprise, the 
kids wanted to meet weekly, snd some 
of their friends wanted to join . This pre- 
sented a challenge, since the original 
group was so close to getting their 
Novice while the rest had only good 
intentions! Then I discovered a retired 
telephone company engineer, Steve 
Gies WGKOC, and was able at times to 
break the group up into two. Aiso, I 
found the young al most-hams willing to 
help their friends out 

Because 5 wpm seems so difficult 
for someone just learning code, we 
worked out a special incentive program. 
There were sped a I prizes for just being 
able to recognize the alphabet, for re- 
ceiving at 3 wpm, and for receiving at 4 
wpm. Since many of I he prizes had 
something to do with the local ice 
cream par for down the street, it be- 
came a regular routine of our Wednes- 
day after-school gatherings. 

In October, we received a 10 meter 
transceiver from Uniden, which we set 
up in the classroom but also allowed 
kids to borrow and take home after 
school. I kept the microphone at school 
so there would not be any temptations 
too great to resist! 

By Christmas, each of the five origi- 
nal members received their Novice 
licenses: Mary Ellen Federhofer 
KB&MWN, Angie Fischer KBGHXY, 
Tom Winkler KBffllBA, Matt Kirchhoff 
KB0ICV, and Patrick Scheu KB0IDHL 
In fact, Angie received her license on 
Christmas Eve, and came to church 
service about an hour early so she 
could make her first contact The next 



day, she had an antenna up in her own 
back yard. Mary Ellen had received her 
license just a week or so before, and 
was also on the air with borrowed 
equipment. 

My original idea was to rely mainly 
on the school station for the kids to 
operate. But once I saw the thrill of the 
kids having a station set up in their own 
home, I began to look for ways to ac- 
quire additional equipment. 

Although I knew that we could raise 
money quickly by selling chocolate 
bars, I wanted to do something that 
would bring the group together, and 
allow the children to use their talents 
and creativity. The idea of a "dinner 
theater" came to mind, I knew that 
some of the girls had already written a 
skit about dating. I suggested that they 
write their own rap about ham radio 
and call themselves "The Code Girls." 
To my surprise they accomplished this 
in a few days. 

There were some difficult afternoons 
shortly before the big night when 
things did not go welt! It was only a 
week away, and some of the kids did 
not yet remember all of their lines. But 
somehow when the big day came, the 
kids did great and everyone had a 
great time. One of the mothers, Shell ie 
Kirchhoff, was able to fix pasta and 
salad for over 1 50 people for only $140! 
Even though w© charged only $5 per 
person, we ended up making over 
$700, which included donations from 
folks who could not come, but sent in 
$5 or $10 to help out the kids. 

Most of the money t had already 
spent, having just come back from 
Florida with a station wagon full of ra- 
dio gear that I had bargained for in 
Memphis and Indiana as well as Flori- 
da. We have about five used radios we 
have purchased— the best being a 
Drake TFV3 which we paid only $150 
for T and which performed well just as 
we received it. Some of the other gear 
that's not working is being restored by 
Cathy Barneys dad, Wayne Barnes, 
who repaired radios when he was in the 
Service. 

More Accomplishments 

Since the dinner theater, several 
others have passed their Novice ex- 
ams: Julie Thien KBffllRH, Amy Rosa 
KB0IR1, Sean Sitek, Vanessa Gomez, 




Photo C. Patnck Scheu KB01DH (tett) and Tom Winkler KB&IBA (right) on low band 
"ground wave" operation. 



Janny Pelersmeyer, and Jenny Ebert. I 
feel confident that three other mem- 
bers will soon pass their Novice ex- 
ams: Mark Moore, Cathy Barnes, and 
Jason Roskowski. The same day Sam- 
my AAOCR received the Westlink 
Young Ham of the Year Award, we had 
our first upgrade: Angie Fischer, who 
passed the Technician exam. 

Yesterday I fixed lunch for some of 
my adult local ham friends, and also 
arranged for some of our new school 
hams to jo^ us. After dinner, they per- 
formed "Morse Code Baby" 1 then intro- 
duced a spontaneous routine. Once 
they perfect this, well make a video of 
it! f'Watch out. East Coast and West 
Coast f The Code Girls will soon be tak- 
ing over Ihe U.S.A. by storm and invad- 
ing everywhere! No classroom within 
the continental U.S. and maybe be- 



yond will be safe any more entrenched 
in a pre-technical subculture deprived 
of their right to the exciting new world 
of ham radio!) 

This week, we are working on plans 
for a new 'Summer Nam Camp" espe- 
cially for junior high kids, I am meeting 
with Sammy AACCR, who has volun* 
leered to help. Most likePy we are going 
to try to acquire a central location 
where young hams from all over the 
metro area will be able to participate. 
We have a lot of work ahead of us, but 
with almost unlimited enthusiasm and 
spirit to drive us on! 



Please send write-ups on interesting 
classes, recrutting ideas, youth club 
activities, or individual children ¥ s expe- 
riences along with photos, to Carole 
Perry at the above address. 




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Number 1 1 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by BUI Clarke WA4BLC 



The Drake R8 Receiver 

Tune in the world with this hot new receiver. 



R.L Drake Company 

540 Richard Street 

Miamisburg OH 45342 

Price Class: $979. 

Tel. (513) 866-2421. 



A Drake, a real Drake! The folks from 
Miamisburg have finally produced a new 
product for the radio hobby market— a high 
grade communications receiver aimed at the 
lucrative and popular SWL market. 

Before I started this review I looked back 
into radio history and found that from about 
1979, the Drake R7 communications receiver 
was the last available Drake HF receiver. The 
last piece of HF ham equipment from Mi- 
amisburg was the TR7 from 1978, from 
which the R7 got its general appearance 
and features. 

Prior to the R7, Drake communications 
receivers included the DSR1 (1971) and the 
DSR2 (1974). One of their most popular 
receivers was the SPR-4 from the early 
1970s. All solid state and featuring a linear 
PTO and vernier dial providing 1 kHz read- 
out. So much for history; let's look at this 
new release from Drake. 

Appearance 

The R8 has a very functional , business- 
like look, sporting few manual controls, and 
a black finish. The lack of radio-like appear- 
ance is due to the heavy reliance on state- 
of-the-art digital control. There are only six 
standard analog controls on the unit, as 
nearly every possible selection that can 
be made by switching ts accomplished 
via the dual-purpose keypad or a function 
switch. 

First Impressions 

The most apparent feature of the R6 is 
the very complete LCD display. Measur- 
ing 5.5" x 1.5". it displays all functions 
and settings in bright characters on a 
black background, making status checking 
super easy. 

The layout of the function buttons places 
them directly beneath their corresponding 
readout points, making selections of AGC, 
bandwidth, mode, etc., very easy to use 
as well. 

Frequency control is via direct entry on 
the keypad, with the UP/DOWN buttons (In 
100 kHz steps), or a TUNING knob (with a 
choice of tuning speeds). The frequency 
reads out to 10 Hz (user selection), When 
put on a frequency, the rig can be locked 
and it will remain there indefinitely. It's very 
stable. There are two VFOs which you can 
select instantly via function switch, and 100 
nonvolatile memories, This means no bat- 

50 73 Amateur Radio Today * October. 1991 



teries are required for memory backup; power 
interruptions will not erase the memory. 

Scan features allow scanning of all memo- 
ries, selected memories, or the frequencies 
between the settings of VFO-A and VFO-B. 
The SQUELCH control greatly enhances the 
use of SCAN, and is active in all modes. 

Bandwidth from 6 kHz to 500 Hz can be 
selected in all modes. This is a very good 




Photo A. R. L Drake f s new RB receiver for SWLing, 




Photo B. The R$ can be connected to various an- 
tennas as well as to a computer through the RS-232 
port. 




Photo C, This inside view of the R8 reveals just how 
neat and sturdy it is! 



feature for crowded band conditions, and for 
fidelity during better times. After all, AM does 
sound better at 6 kHz wide than at 1 ,8 kHz. But 
each bandwidth has its place and use. 

The controllable AGC, NOTCH FILTER 
(manually operated from an analog control), 
NOISE BLANKER, and RF input controls 
(analog and switched attenuator/preamp) all 
combine to make the receiver very flexible. 
Unlike ham equipment, the R8 has a 
built-in clock/timer with an output port on 
the rear for remote control of a tape 
recorder (or other hardware), This time fea- 
ture is very popular with SWLs for recording 
odd-hour programs, and it can also be used 
in a clock-alarm-radio scheme (though a 
very expensive clock-radio). The clock also 
displays time on the LCD when the unit is 
powered off. 

The fold^down front feet make table 
placemen! and viewing of the LCD display 
and S-meter clear and easy. 

In many ways, the RS's control and dis- 
play system is not far from that of a modern, 
fulMeatured 2 meter HT. Loads of bells and 
whistles provide extensive flexibility. 

The manual that comes with the R8 is 
very well done, with complete explanations 
about each feature and control, A section is 
included that delves well into computer 
command of the digital switching system, 
and a log is included to write down the perti- 
nent information about what is entered in 
each of those one hundred memories. It is, 
however, without block and schematic dia- 
grams. 

Operating the R8 

The R8 was tested on a 1 60 meter Caroli* 
na Windom antenna (about 265 feet long) at 
50 feet, and also on a 40/75 meter dipole at 
35 feet. It was compared, via an A/B switch 
system, with an ICOM R71 A, I selected the 
R71A due to its excellent reputation as a 
"world SWL standard." 

The tunability and stability of the R8 are 
excellent; however, although the tuning 
knob has a good weight, it's a little small for 
my taste. 

I am a real believer in keypad frequency 
entry. It is quick and accurate. The rubber- 
ized keypad is easy and flawless to operate. 

When in the AM mode, I found the SYN- 
CHRO (synchronous detector) to be great 
when fade-caused distortion became a 
problem. This is a feature that really works. 



Frequency Range 

Modes 

Sensitivity 



Frequency Stability 
Frequency Accuracy 
Selectivity 



Specifications 
0.1-30 MHz 

AM, LSB, USB H CW\ RTTY, FM 
SSB & CW (10 dB S + N/N) 

<1 nV (0.1-1 .5 MHz) 

<D.5uV {1.5-30 MHz) 

< 0.25 uV (5.0-30 MHz) preamp on 
AM(10dBS + N/N) 

< 3 uV (0.1 -1.5 MHz) 
<1.5uV(1 .5-30 MHz) 

< .8 uV (5.0-30 MHz) preamp on 
FM(12dBSlNAD) 

<.5uV (1.5-30 MHz) 

<+l0ppm(-10*-50*C) 

<±100Hz(-lO a -50°C) 

AM f LS8, USB, RTTY, CW 

6 kHz @ -6 dB- < 1 2 kHz @ -60 d B 
4 kHz @ -6 dB-< B kHz @ ^60 dB 
2.3 kHz @ -6 dB- < 4,5 kHz @ -60 dB 
1 .8 kHz @ -6 d8^<3,6 kHz @ -60 d8 
500 Hz @ -6 dB - 1 .5 kHz @ -60 dB 



FM 



-6dS- <25kHz@-60dB 



Ultimate Selectivity 
Image Rejection 

IF Rejection 

Dynamic Range 

3rd Order Intercept Point 

IFs 

AGC 

Antenna Input 
Notch Filter 
Audio Output 
Recorder Output 
Demod Output 
Clock Accuracy 
Power Requirements 

Size 
Weight 

Accessories 



12 kHz * 
>95dS 
>60dB(l00kHz-1.5MHz 

> 80 dB (1.5-30 MHz) 
>80dB(45MHz) 
>100dB(50kHz) 

> 90 dS (1 .5 - 30 MHz @ 20 kHz spacing) 

> +5dBm © 20 kHz spacing 

> -20 dBm @ 5 kHz spacing 
First 45 MHz; 
Second 50 kHz 

Attack time 1 ms 

Retease 2 sec (SLOWh300 ms (FAST) 

50/500 ohms 

Audio Type > 40 dB depth (500-5000 Hz) 

2.5W @4 ohms with < 1 0% distortion 

300 mV @4,7k ohms 

300 mV @ 4.7k ohms 

< ±2 sec/month 

1 00/1 20/200/240 VAC (60 Hz) @40W 

1 1-16 VDC@2 amps 

13.rWxS2"Dx13' / D 

13 lbs. 

•VHF converter 35-55 and 108-1 74 MHz 

• Matching externa! speaker 

• Software package for the IBM XT/AT 
(clones) to allow enhanced operation 
of the R8 



computer interfacing is 
given in the manual (this 
section is very good), Sug- 
gested software for com- 
puter control includes 
PROCOMM PLUS™ and 
BITCOMM™ operated on 
an IBM XT/AT or clone. 
Optional software is avail- 
able from Drake for use 
with the R8 (not available 
fee this evaluation). 

On a warm summer 
evening when the pop- 
corn (static caused by 
distant thunderstorms) 
was popping heavily, I 
listened to my regular 
nets with the R8. The R8 
held its own very well, be- 
ing less affected by the 
static than my ICOM IO 
751 A transceiver- It was 
not as quiet as the Ten-Tec 
Corsair II , but then, these 
pieces of equipment are of 
a very different design and 
purpose. 

The choice of bandwidth 
made it fairly easy to re- 
duce nearby signals, such 
as those that abound on 75 
and 40 meters. Add the 
passband filtering, and 
you can just about elimi* 
nate any adjacent signals 
as much as is possible. 

Speaking of bandwidth, 
you should hear what a re- 
al strong LSB signal on 75 
sounds like through the 6 
kHz filter. Just like broad- 
cast AM ! Too bad ! couldn 't 
locate the mike plug on the 
R8. 

A Few Comments 



The NOTCH filter, although effective, was 
disappointing in depth and in its analog opera- 
tion. I cannot understand why any manufac- 
turers produce receivers with manually oper- 
ated notch controls today. My Datong ANF 
(Automatic Notch Control) knocked out tones 
the R8 could not— and with no manual control 
input! 

The PASSBAND OFFSET was, as expect- 
ed, effective in removing interference from 
nearby signals. Selecting a narrow bandwidth 
made it all the more effective. 

I was not impressed by the internal speaker 
with its typically poor fidelity. An external 
speaker is a must for real enjoyment. 

The S-meter read as expected, and com- 
pared in accuracy to other receivers. 

The tone control lacks real BASS/TREBLE 
authority. 

The R8 is a natural for computer con- 
trol, since all controls, except for those in 
analog form, can be commanded via the 
RS-232 port. Command information about 



After carefully evaluat- 
ing the Drake R8 receiver, I 
must say that I am well pleased with its per- 
formance, Over the years more than a few 
pieces of Drake equipment have passed 
through my shack, and I still think you have to 
go a very long way to beat the receivers of the 
R4 series. They were quiet, stable, selective, 
and sensitive. The R8 compares favorably 
with these older receivers, as few digital-type 
receivers can. 

Modern digitally-controlled receivers make 
lots of internally manufactured noise— noise 
that adversely affects their operation. The 
Drake R8 does not suffer appreciably from this 
problem. 

The R8 is like a breath of fresh air, with its 
ground-up engineering and up-to-date digital 
control from the front panel. I am very pleased 
to see a quality HF receiver of American man- 
ufacture that should successfully compete on 
the world market. 

Oh yes, a public question for Drake; Where 
Is the T8 transmitter to go with the R8? The 
world is waiting! 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 51 



Number 1 2 on your Feedback card 



Homing in 



JoeMoellPE-.KtiOV 
P.O. Box 2508 
Futterton CA 92633 

Build the TBOX 

At last, you won your dub's com- 
petitive RDf contest ("foxhunt" of "T- 
hunf ). Now U's your turn to hid© the 
transmitter. YouVe driven for hours 
to pick the perfect hard4o-find spot, 
but now you need some distinctive au* 
die to transmit, and a way to ID the 
hidden "T." 

You could stay with your rig and 
talk throughout the hunt. But that's 
hard on your throat and gets boring 
after a while. Besides, if hunters spot 
you, they'll know where the "T" Is, ifs 
lots more fun to conceal the fox, per* 
haps even bury IV. Then you can stay 
under cover nearby and watch the fun 
as the hunters approach and try to 
"sniff" H out. 




Ptooio A. Prototype TBOX circuit on 
NGMBR's PC board. 

What you need is a 'tone box" or 
"foxbox," A good one produces a dis- 
tinctive sound, so the hunters have no 
doubt that they're tracking down the 
right signal. It cycles the transmitter on 
and off periodically for intermittent 
signal hunts. 

A fox box must incorporate station 
identification, to comply with FCC 
rutes. The catlsign should be easily 
changeable, to accommodate up- 
grades and permit the box to be used 
by all members ol a hunting group 
Small size and low batten/ drain are 
important design objectives 

Micro-P Solution 

Several good discrete-logic circuits 
for tone boxes have circulated among 
T-hunters over the years. But for the 
utmost versatility, a microprocessor is 
ideal, 

Ron Seese N6MBR is an active T- 
hunter with the Oonejo Valley Amateur 
Radio Club, based in Thousand Oaks> 
California. He is also a clever digital 
designer and has developed a multi- 
featured foxbox designed around the 
B0C31 CMOS microprocessor. He 
calls it TBOX— a box to control the hid- 
den T, It meets all the above require- 
ments, yet it contains only six ICs and a 
few discrete components. 

TBOX provides a readily -identifiable 
tone pattern tor the hidden transmitter 
audio Or if you prefer, it sends ran- 



Radio Direction Finding 

domly-pttched beeps. Transmission 
can be continuous, with regular CW 
identification. 

For intermittent-signal hunts, it auto- 
matically turns the transmitter on and 
off at regular intervals, with CW ID on 
each transmission. You can select on 
and off times over a wide range To 
save your batteries, TBOX draws only 
60mAai12VDC. 

TBOX programming does not re- 
quire a myriad of switch settings. In 
fact, there is only one switch on the 
unit— the power switch! To set the 
TBOX parameters (such as mode, call* 
sign, CW speed, and on/off timing), 



tains 128 bytes of dynamic RAM built 
in . R6 and Ct reset U i at power turn-on 
to ensure proper startup. EEPROM U5 
holds the cailsign and other configura- 
tion data during power interruptions. 
RS-232 interface chip U€ links the unit 
to your computer via Jl tor parameter 
setting. 

J2 connects TBOX to youf hidden 
transmitter. 01 and associated compo- 
nents close the radio's push-to-talk 
(PTT) circuit. C8. C9 t Cl 8, R9, and R 1 
buffer the transmit audio. Potentiome- 
ter VR1 sets proper modulation level ^ 

RH combines the PTT and audio 
lines to drive hand-held rigs, For COM 
HTs. use a 3.9k resistor al R11. and 
hook only the AUDIO output line to the 
HT's mike input. The same connection 
works for Yaesu HTs. except that R11 
is 2 -2k, For non-hand-held transmit- 
ters, delete R1 1 and connect the sepa* 
rate PTT and AUDIO OUT lines to the 



PC board, and would rather have 
someone else do the work of making 
the board and programming the BIOS 
PROM. Fortunately, N6MBR has done 
it. Send Ron a check tor 35 dollars and 
ask for the "Homing In" TBOX pack* 
age. He will mail you a btank 3-25* x 6' 
double-sided circuit board (see Photo 
A) and a programmed PROM. He will 
also throw in one ol the harcHo-find 
EEPROMsforUS 

Of course neither I nor 73 Amateur 
Radio Today can warrant this offer. But 
I can assure you that the six boards 
used at this spring's Friendship Radio 
Games foxhunt worked flawlessly. The 
board is high quality, with plated- 
through holes. Parts layout details are 
included. 

The ICs in N6MBR's board are so 
close together that some sockets may 
not fit, I used pin-line socket strips in- 
stead. These are solder-tail socket 



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Figure t TBOX schematic diagram. Alt capacitances are in microfarads, except C2 andC3, 



just hook the RS-232 cable to your 
computer, load your modem program, 
and use TBOX s prog ram med-m menu 
structure. It's much like setting the 
parameters on your packet TNC, 

A battery 'Operated computer with 
RS-232 port is perfect for programming 
your TBOX, If you don't have one, it 
doesn't matter. You can program it 
writh your home computer (my old 
Kaypro works just fine) or even a dumb 
terminal. 

TBOX includes a non-volatite memo- 
ry (EEPROM) that remembers your 
hun( parameters, After programming, 
disconnect TBOX and take it to the hid- 
ing spot. When you turn it on In the 
field, it will come up just as you pro- 
grammed it. 

How It Works 

Figure 1 is the complete TBOX sche- 
matic diagram, CPU chip U1 executes 
the program o! EPROM U3. U1 con- 



appropriate pins on a mike plug to 
mate with your rig. 

Lets Build It 

If you enjoy wire-wrap assembly, you 
will have no trouble duplicating Ron's 
circuit from Figure 1. Be sure to put 
capacitors C1 1 -C1 4 and C 1 6 as dose 
as possible to the appropriate ICs to 
prevent unwanted oscillation and inter* 
action. I suggest socketing all ICs ex- 
cept ihe +5V regulator. Be sure to use 
a socket at U3 to permit program up- 
grading. 

If you have access to a "PROM 
burner," you can program U3 yourself. 
The latest BIOS program (version 07 
as of this writing) is available on Che 
73 BBS at (603) 525-4438. Hams 
on the West Coast can find it on the 
NOMAD PCBoard BBS at (805) 498- 
3500. File names are TBOX07SIN and 
TBOX07.DOC. 

IF you're tike me, you would prefer a 



contacts thai come in rows of 25 to 40. 
Just break off as many as you need for 
each row of eacn DIP and solder them 
onto the board. They are small enough 
to allow ICs to be stfe by side only o i 
inch apart. 

Note on the schematic (hat certain 
part designators, such as U4, are not 
used. Also, there are holes and etch for 



rf^ 



flXD 



X 



j2 



TBOX 



^ 



TxO 
flXO 
CTS 

DTR 
SO 



COMPUTER 



Figure 2. Typical cable connections for 
computers/terminals with DB-25 RS- 
232 ports. 



52 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 





Parts List 


ut 


80C31 


CPU 


U2 


74HCT373 


latch 


U3 


27C256 


EPROM 


U5 


93C46 


EEPROM 


U6 


MAX232 


RS-232 interface 


U7 


7805CTH 


voltage regulator 


Q1 


2N2222A 


transistor 


Dl 


1N914 


diode 


D2 


1 N400t 


diode 


X1 


12.0 MHz 


crystal 


J1 


DB9PRA 


male connector 


J2 


D89SRA 


female connector 



Sources of Parts: iCs. connectors, crystal: 
J DR Micro Devices, 2233 Bran ham Lane, San 
Jose CA 95124. Tel. <800) 539 5000, PC 
board, PROM, EEPROM: Ron Sees© 
N6MBR, 6136 Landino Dr\, Westlake Village 
CA91362. 



additional parts on the printed circuit 
board. Those parts are not needed for 
this vers f on of TBOX. Ron is working 
on new features that use them. I'll have 
more on that next month. 

Capacitor C2D is essential to prevent 
U7 oscillation when supply leads are 
long. There are no holes for C20 on the 
PC board, so "airline" the part on the 
back of the board. 

Firing It Up 

Carefully inspect your work after as- 
sembly* Pay special attention to polari- 
ty of the electrolytic capacitors, partic- 
ularly those on U6. Check for shorts on 
the +5V line before installing the ICs, 

Install U7 first, then power up the 
unit and check the +5V bus. If every- 
thing is OK, remove power and install 



the remaining ICs. Now 
hook up the computer and 
transmitter interfaces. 

Figure 2 shows wiring of 
a typical cable to connect 
T80X to a standard DB-25 
RS-232 port. TBOX is con- 
figured as Data Terminal 
Equipment (DTE). This 
means that TXD on TBOX 
goes to RXD on the com- 
puter, and RXD on TBOX 
goes to TXD at the com- 
puter. 

Your computer or termi- 
nal program may require a 
high signal on the DCD line 
(pin 8 of DB-25). If so, add a 
jumper from pin 6 to pin 8. 
Software and hardware 
handshaking is not used. Flow control 
in your terminal program is not neces- 
sary, so turn it off. Set the computer to 
2400 bps, 8 data bits, and no parity. 

Put a dummy load on the transmitter 
and listen to the TBOX signal on a sep- 
arate receiver. At power up, TBOX out- 
puts the menu to the computer, then 
goes into transmit mode. Press the re- 
turn key on the terminal to stop trans- 
mitting, and enter the command mode. 
When setting parameters, shn ply enter 
three digits. For example, to set Mode 
2, type "M" and then type M 002" with- 
out a carriage return. 

Your turn to hide the fox may come 
sooner than you expect, so get started 
on your TBOX now. Next month, I 1 II 
have more on programming and using 
your tone box. 




Number 26 on your Feedback card 



EALER DIRECTORY 



DELAWARE 



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Kenwood, Ten-Tec, A£A, Kan ironies, DR- 
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Road, New Castle DE 19720. (302) 328- 
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DEALERS: Your company name and message can contain up Eo 50 words for as little as $420 yearly (prepaid], or $210 for 
six months (prepaid). No mention at mail-order business please. Directory text and paymenl must reach us 60 days in 
advance of publication. For example, advertising for the April '91 issue must be in our hands by February 1st. Mall to 73 
Amateur Radio Today, Box 278, Forest Road. Hancock NH 03443. 



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Number 13 on your Feedback card 



Bitt Brown WBSELK 
% 73 Magazine 
FomsiRoad 
Hancock NH 03449 

Have a BLT for Launch 

After watching videos and demon- 
strations of other balloon experiments, 
members of the Houston AM5AT 
group decided to put together their 
own launch effort. Dubbed the BLT (for 
Balloon Launch Team), they decided 
to build an inexpensive 2m FM teleme- 
try package for their first flight. 

This first package (BLT-1) carried a 
100 mW 2m FM transmitter (see the 
August 1990 issue of 73) which sent 
out an audio telemetry sequence, A 
custom designed analog telemetry 
system sent out a series of tones sep- 
arated with a CW message. The pitch 





Photo A. Bums Cteland WB5HLZ (left) 
and Man Fox NSLKJ (right) prepare to 
launch a BL T special to the edge 
of space 



Ham Television 



of the tones determined pressure, and 
inside and outside temperature. The 
altitude was determined with a pres- 
sure sensor circuit designed by John 
Fleischer of the Transotve Corporation 
(the circuit appeared in the October 
1990 issue of Radio-Etectronics), The 
original design was meant to be used 
up to 20,000 feet on model rockets, but 
the BLT group used just the analog 
portion end recalibrated it to operate 
up to over 100.000 feet. Since the 
package didn't generate a lot of heat, 
Andy WA5ZIB included a chemical 
heat pack to keep things warm during 
the flight. 





Photo &> Andy Mac At lister WASZIB puts the finishing touches on the first 
BLT experiment. 



On December 8, 1 990 the BLT group 
sent their first payload up from the 
Huntsville Texas Municipal Airport. Af- 
ter a great flight up to over 100,000 
feet, the package parachuted down to 
land about 30 miles to the south near 
the town of Magnolia. Reception of the 
telemetry signal was observed over a 
wide area of Texas and Loursiana. 

Recovery Texas Style 

After a long search, the chase crew 
eventually pinned down the landing 
site about a mile or two off of the main 
highway. Things were going well until 
they asked the ranch owner if they 
could search for their package He 
replied, "NO. come back tomorrow!" 
Nothing mpre frustrating than hearing 
your pay load crying out for help and 
not being able to do anything about it. 

The dejected tracking crew almost 
decided to risk their lives and go in 



Photo C. The second (and third) BLTpayload. The weathervane helped maintain 
stability during the flight, Note the Radio Shack beeper which helped the chase 
team to hear the downed payload. The TV camera/mirror ts on the other side of the 
payload. 



anyways but thought better of it, A cou- 
ple of trackers returned the next day 
and to their amazement the pay load 
was still transmitting! The landowner 
took them back through several locked 
gates as they closed in on the package. 
It turned out the payload had parachut- 
ed down in the middle of a large private 
(and heavily patrolled) hunting pre- 
serve! After a short search they found 
the payload hanging about 80 feet up 
in a tree. 

One of their escorts disappeared for a 
few minutes and returned with his rrfle. 
With just a few shots, he cut the string 
(90 feet away) and brought the payload 
tumbling down out of the tree. Every- 
one was thankful they had the foresight 
not to trespass the night before! 

BLT-2 

With the success of their first flight, 
the South Texas Balloon Launch Team 
embarked on a much more ambitious 
effort, This payload contained an ATV 
transmitter with a live TV camera (GBC 
CGD-100K active mirror control (to 
point periodically at the horizon or the 
ground), digital voice ID on the video 
subcarrier (the messages changed 
with various stages of the flight — one of 
them actually said, "I'm falling' ' during 
the parachute descent), a CW HF 




Photo D< The chase team recovers the first BLT payfoad nearly 30 hours after 
launch. . and it's stifi ticking t L to R: Mike WA5TWT> Mike N5QMG> Bums 
WB5HL2, and James N5PRQ 



54 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



The Balloon Launch Team of South Texas 



High Coordinator 


WB5HLZ 


Payload Master 


WA5ZIB 


Pay load Integrator 


WA5TWT 


Captain Video 


N5JXO 


Computer Wizard 


WB5TTS 


Earth Software 


N5LCO 


Analog telemetry 


WA5ZIB 


Antennas 


N5EM 


ATV system 


N5JXO 


Back-up power 


N5SUA 


Balloon system 


WB5HLZ 


Camera system 


WA5LHM 


DF leader 


KC5CP 


Digital voice 


N5JXO 


Flight computer 


WB5TTS 


Flight plan 


WB5HL2&WB8ELK 


Flight software 


WB5TTS 


Mirror system 


N5RPQ 


Net control 


WB5HJV 


Power system 


WB5HLZ 


Telemetry software 


N5JCO 


Thermal control 


WA5TWT 


Tracking software 


WB8ELK 


VHF transmitter 


WA5ZJB 


Video ID/sequencer 


WBSELK 


1 0m beacon 


K7IRK 


Weatherman 


KA3BKU 



The Whole BLT Crew: WD5BDX, WB5BGQ, KA3BKU, KC5CP F WD5D2C, 
WB8ELK, N5EM. WB5HJV, WB5HLZ, N5JXG, WD5JRD, N5LCCX WA5LHIU, 
N5LKJ, N5MPN t WA5PCO, N5QMG, N5RPQ, N5SUA, WB5TTS, WA5TWT, 
WB5UUK, WA5WOD, WA5ZIB, A, Alexy, J. Edinburgh, J. Johnson, J. McK- 
elvy, J, Mock, S, Ross, C. Summerviile, Civil Air Patrol, Brazos Valley ARC and 
Electronic Parts Outlet, 



beacon on 10m, and 2 in FM telemetry 
that even included a packet telemetry 
downlink from the onboard flight com- 
puter. 

The flight computer took the analog 
telemetry signals and converted them 
to ASCII text for the packet and CW 
downlink. It also controlled the TV cam- 
era mirror. During ascent, the comput- 
er would cycle the mirror to point at the 
ground or the horizon every 50 sec- 
onds. During the parachute ride back 
to earth, the mirror stayed in the down 
position to look for distinguishing land- 
marks on the ground. 

Crash! 

BLT-2 was launched from the Whar- 
ton Texas Municipal airport on the 
morning of May 11, 1991. Due to 10 
mph winds, the balloon crashed into 
the side of a hangar just seconds after 
liftoff! The 10m CW beacon transmitter 
(a 2S.322 MHz Fireball transmitter 
built by Bob Moody K7IRK— see the 
November 1990 issue of 73) was 
ripped off the package along with the 
ATV antenna. The flight computer 
reset to a dormant mode and the stabi- 
lization fin fluttered back to the ground. 
The balloon and what was left of BLT-2 
headed skyward (fortunately the 2m 
beacon still worked). Spirits were defi* 
nitefy not as high as the balloon at 
this point. Fortunately the balloon 
burst prematurely at 27 t 000 feet 
(probably due to the crash). The direc- 



tion-finding crew went into action and 
quickly found the package 12 miles 
away in a field near Egypt (Texas). It 
was noon, so the crew dusted off the 
payload, reset the computer, glued the 
ATV antenna back on, and re-attached 
the 10m beacon. It was time to try 
again. 

Two Flights in One Day 

The hastily refurbished BLT-3 was 
ready to fly. This time the launch team 
carefully choreographed the release 
sequence which resulted in a beautiful 
takeoff (no crashes this time). 

Fantastic live camera images from 
the payload delighted everyone watch- 
ing the ATV receiver at the launch site. 
Telemetry from the packet downlink 
was displayed on laptop computers at 
mission control as well as by the chase 
crew. Those without packet stations 
had a blast decoding the CW teleme- 
try. The ATV signal was received as far 
away as Dallas (over 250 miles) and the 
2m FM telemetry could be heard 
on HTs at that distance as welL The 50 
milliwatt 10 Fireball beacon was even 
heard 500 miles away {ground wave) by 
Warren W5DFU in Tulsa. Oklahoma, 

This time the balloon landed 18 
miles to the north in a hayfjeid near 
Wall is. The now-experienced chase 
team found the payload in short order, 
A lot of fun and adventure was had by 
all. Look for future flights from the 
South Texas BLT. 




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73 Amateur Radio Today » October, 1991 55 




Number 14 an your Feedback card 



INTERNA TIONAL 



Arnie Johnson HI 8 AC 
103 Old Homestead Hwy. 
N. Swanzey, NH 03431 

Notes from FN42 

Lots of news this month, and promis- 
es of more to come: Zafizis Tzobakas 
SV2AHT wilt report on the mountain 
climbers of Greece, who made another 
trip to the htgh country with an enpedt- 
ttoo to Pamtrot the Himalayas last July. 
J&nas Paskauskas L Y2ZZ wilt provide 
us with the results of the Ham Confer- 
ence that took place in June. And we 
have another volunteer Hambassador, 
Ed Sershon DUN7PHY. Ha and his 
wife have moved to Germany from 
Seattle, Washington, USA and expect 
to be there for many years. If you have 
information tor him t send /t to Ed Ser- 
shon. Ferdinand Thomas Weg 6\ 3389 
Braunlage, Germany. 

Skip Wesmch W88QWM wrote us a 
nice tetter to let us know how much he 
enjoyed the article about "Bom 38 
Moscow. " He also wrote to Ron Gang 
4X1 MK, who had submitted the article 
complied by Oded 4X4SO^ Thank you. 
Skip. We appreciate feedback from our 
readers. Those of you who have spe- 
cial wishes as to what you wouid like to 
see in this column from other parts of 
the world, please whtef t can put the 
request in the column, 

73 receives many beautiful OSL 
cards each month. Since only one can 
be chosen for "QSL of the Month," 
Associate Editor Joyce Sawtelie sitps 
me the best of the rest to see if I can 
use them in my column. Even though 
these cards do not win the free one- 
year subscription, at least they are 
published for alt to enjoy. 

The one I realty enjoyed this month 
was submitted by Gonzafo De Murga 
CX6HN forhts radio club. CX1RA The 
OX team from his club uses the call 
sign CVtR. The lighthouse on the card 
was built in 1876. Note the sea lions on 
the rocks. The lighthouse on the fsfa de 
Lotos {"Island of Wolves") would 
make a dandy radio tower, don't you 
think?— Arnie, N18AC 

Roundup 

Czechoslovakia From a tetter from 
Jin Pecek OK2QX. translated by 
OK2YN. on Czechoslovak Radio Am- 
ateurs and the Council of Europe DX ■ 
pedition TP50K/ 

The Council of Europe <C*E,) m 
Strasbourg, France has 42 years of his- 
tory, founded in 1949. The group of 
active radio amateurs associated with 
this organization initiated the Council 
of Europe Radio Amateur Club (CER- 
AC), similar to the radio clubs at the 
United Naiions and ihe International 
Telecommunications Union, The presi* 
deniofCERACisMr.W, Rossle , who is 
also the director of the audio visual ser- 
vice ol the CE- The primary force be- 
hind the ham activity Is Mr. Frances 



Kramer, F6FQK, the appointed direc- 
tor of the special event station with the 
permanent callsign of TP2CE. 

The station is situated in an extrater- 
ritorial area in the mam building of the 
C.E. Even though it should have the 
same rights and status as 4U1ITU, it 
has not txen recognized as a separate 
country yet by the DXCC Committee- 

There have been etgh! short DXpedi- 
tions to TP2CE in the past. It has been 
proposed to activate this callsign on 
Ihe occasions of admitting new mem- 
bers to the CE. For example, when 
Hungary was admitted last November, 
At that time it used the callsign of 
TP5HA. 



ment beam for 20/1 5/1 0. a dipole for 40 
meters, and a 3-element fixed beam for 
80 meters. My operation was on SSB 
only, but the next DXpedition will be 
CW only. 

We logged on a laptop computer 
which was really nice h except that the 
French keyboard was not the classic 
QWERTY keying which caused me to 
have to search for each key individu al- 
ly. To Increase the speed of operation 
we helped one another by one operat- 
ing and the other logging This did not 
work very welt when I was operating in 
the Czech language or beating down 
the prle-up of testations in Russian be- 
cause the logger did not understand 
those languages, At those times f had 
to keep ihe log myself. 

In spite of all the problems, we made 
1,718 contacts in about 26 hours. The 
last contact was made at about 1700 
on Sunday, and I was on the Eurocity 
Express departing at 1807. 




A DB LOBOS - URtlOD 

utitud: as* ar 23* 

Umgitud: 54° St f M* * 




RADIO CLUB MAI.1.MINAIH1 
IthtiCIA MUNICIPAL UK HALO 






Photo A. QSL card for CVtR and CX1RA (other side) of Matdormdo t Uruguay, 
South America. 



I was given the opportunity to take 
part In activation of this station at the 
end of 1990, After exchanging some 
letters with our Federal Ministry of For- 
eign Affairs, CERAC and the represen- 
tatives of the F J.S AJ.C, in Czechoslo- 
vakia organized the DXpedition as the 
event of the Association of the Czecho- 
slovak Radio Amateurs Railroaders, as 
I am also president of the newly formed 
branch of the f I .S.A J .C. Thanks to the 
kind support o! the headquarters of our 
State Railroads and otthe F.I.SALC, 
the railroad transportation was at no 
cost. 

I arrived In Strasbourg on Friday af- 
ternoon, April 26, at the railway station, 
but in spite of previous arrangements 
no one was there to meet me. 1 was in a 
strange country without knowledge of 
the language, but the local police gave 
me directions to the CE. building. 

The operation of the station was 
teamwork with the aforementioned 
people. Philippe F6GOC (physician 
and technician) and Santiago FD1 RAY 
(ex EA4EII, DA48J, and TJ1/EA4EI1), 
the permanent ambassador of Spain in 
IheC.E. 

A! first the equipment used was a 
Kenwood TS-440 and SB-20G amp, but 
Philippe brought an ICOM IC-761 and 
power amp (800 watts out} the follow- 
ing day. The antennas were a 5-e4e- 



The callsign used, TP50K. will never 
be heard again, as it was used on the 
occasion of admitting Czechoslovakia 
to the CE. as its 25th member. The 
next activity of this station should be 
later this year, probably during the oc- 
casion of admitting Poland to the CE 
with the callsign o* TP5SP 

This event was good training for fu- 
ture DXpeditions I am hoping to visit 
ZA-iand in the future and wish to be the 
first to operate there, I am in contact 
with the Embassy of Albania in Prague 
which is attempting to help me. I hope 
that future DXpeditions will receive the 
support from the Czechoslovak Radio 
Amateurs Society, 

The CERAC issues two diplomas: 
the first, the Council Of Europe Award, 
for contacts with the member countries 
of the Council of Europe; the second, 
the European World Wide Award 
(EWWAJ. for distinguished countries 
from all the world round Those inter- 
ested may apply— the diplomas are 
worth rtl IOK2QX, Jiri Pecek, Riedlova 
12, 750 02 Prerov, Czechoslovakia,} 

Japan From the JARL Newsletter: 
BAND PLAN: Up to now the JARL has 
formulated an amateur hand plan by 
listening to the demands of amateur 
radio operators, but now the Ministry of 
Posts and Telecommunications has of- 
ficiaJiy issued a band plan. 



The purpose of this decision is to 
give the plan authority according to ra- 
dio law, and to encourage efficient and 
orderly use of amateur bands by plac- 
ing a legal requirement on all amateur 
radio station licensees, whelher they 
are JARL members or not. to adhere to 
the band plan. 

Silent Key: On May 20, the first wom- 
an amateur radio operator in Japan, 
Mrs. Chiyono Suzuki (nee Suglta), ex 
J2IX. died at the age of 84, She be- 
came the first YL ham on October 14, 
1933, in pursuance of the will of her 
elder brother, Mr. Toshio Sugita J 1 0N, 
when he died suddenly. After WWII, 
Mrs, Suzuki was known to have be- 
come very active once again under the 
callsigns JGl WKS and JJtSNC. 

3J1RL, Antarctic: JARL has re- 
ceived a letter from Mr Toyoshi 
Arisawa JA4EDV, a member of the 
32nd Japanese Antarctic Research 
Expedition (JARE) team, who left 
Tokyo for the Antarctic on November 
14 T last year. The current state of ama- 
teur radio operations is: 

1. General state of operations: Al- 
most all QSOs are made on 21 MHZ 
during lunch break. 12:30-13:00 local 
time (0930-1000 UTC) Monday 
through Friday, The total number of 
stations worked as of May 21 was 560, 

2. 8J1RL: A tower about 15 meters 
high is being used for normal opera* 
Uorvs. At present we have three 
projects planned — a new pole intend- 
ed fof Europe, a dipole for 7 MHz, and 
an antenna for other WARC bands. 

3. Miscellaneous: HF packet was op- 
erated experimentally from May 6 to 
May 1 9. A beacon at 21 .1045 succeed- 
ed in making contact with JF1SNA in 
Japan on May 9, 0907 LTTC. This was 
probably the first official packet com- 
munication ever effected between 
Showa Base and mainland Japan. 

Latvia A letter from the Kipsala DX 
Club in Riga: 1. Yuri Baltin YL2DX 
started another polar trip on July 1 to 
several new tOTA islands and F.J.L. in 
the Russian Arctic: 4K2DX, 4K3DX, 
and 4K4DX. All QSLs only via the man- 
ager, Mrs. Aifa Dimde. YLR-48-18, P, 
Kaste 18 T Riga, 226048, Republic of 
Latvia. Europe. Please SAE with return 
postage, Do not pul on envelopes any 
callsigns, and wrap afl contents reli- 
ably. 

2. Aifa Dlmde wilt only keep for the 
next six months the logs and QSLs of 
the following active stations: EK1KP 
(Graham Bell is., F.J L., Aug. 1990}, 
EKfcAC (Komi Rep. & YamaJ Reg., 
ONLY March t991). RG2WCY (World 
Comm. Year, Nov.-Dec. 1983). UAtK/ 
UZ3AXX {Keperweem, Chukoika. July 
1990), UK2GAB (1974-1984). 
UQ1GWX {1985 1990), UQ1GXX 
(1984-1989), UOftGZZ (only Jan. 
1985), YL2RG (Special Stn., Dec. 
1988-Jan. 1989, Oct. 1989), and 
YL2O0SM (S. Morse Bicentenary, April 
1991). 

3. Any ham having at least five QSOs 
in CW during April 1991 with Memorial 
S, Morse stations {such as YL2CCSM, 
MORSE, VI91SM. 3A200SM. I2MM 
. . etc.) can get a splendid special 
TROPHY from the YLCWG in memory 



56 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 991 



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times on four separate bands (i.e., at 
least two separate calls must have 
besn worked). 

Send only log data of QSOs along 
with your complete address plus 36 
IRCs by regis!© red mail to the man* 
ager, Mrs. A, Dimde, not later man Dec 
1.1991 

4. New GSL routes for YL1XX, 
YL2DX. and YL25RF: 226001 , Riga-1 . 
P.K. TO.OslTiygaJlo. Republic of Latvia. 
Europe. Ptease mart as above, and with- 
out the telttaie bulge of a folded SAE. 

5 The Soviet QSL Bureau, Box 88 
Moscow, does NOT work for Latvian 
hams (all YL, UQs) any more, 

Lithuania (Article from a Colorado 
newspaper read during my vaca tton.— 
ArnieJ From the Rocky Mountain 
News, July 14, 1991, by Holger 
Jensen, News International Editor: 
Lithuanian ham told world of Soviet in- 
vasion, "One of the unsung heroes of 
Lithuania's drive for independence is 
Ginlas Sakenas, a ham radio operator 
better known to American hams by his 
callsign LY2BKW, 

''When Soviet Interior Ministry 
Iroops. the notorious Black Berets, in- 
vaded Vilnius* the capita! of Lithuania 
on Jan. 13, he was the first to inform 
the outside world 

4 'For 14 hours, Sakenas was the sole 
source of uneensored information from 
his homeland — the Soviets had seized 
all regular broadcast stations, TV net- 
works, and other news outlets in 
Lithuania* and had surrounded partia* 
ment " 

Along with information about the sit- 
uation, Sakenas also provided a relay 
from hams in the parfiarnent building, 
After 14 hours of operation, he re- 
ceived a tip that the Soviets had traced 
his signal and he had to shut down. 
Several weeks later he was able lo re- 
turn to the air to reassure hams that he 



was okay, 

Sakenas was in the Uniled States as 
a treat provided by four American hams: 
Richard High W0HEP of Aurora, Colo- 
rado; Budd Drummond WJ6Q of Red- 
ding, California: Wayne Peterson of 
K6ZSJ of Wood side, California; and 
Chuck Carpenter N6CFO of Riverside, 

California. 

"Sakenas is convinced his republic 
eventually will get its independence. 
And he concedes he probably wont be 
able to take any more two- month vaca- 
tions when it shifts from a state-con- 
trolled to a free-market economy/' Gut. 
Sakenas said, "ft will be worth it, We 
were independent before Stalin an* 
nested Lithuania, so we know how to 
stand on our own two feet." 

Saudi Arabia Media Release from 
the Ministry of PJ.T., Kingdom of 
Saudi Arabia: Saudi Arabia will display 
the Kingdom's up-to-the-minute com- 
munications technology in a pavilion of 
traditional Arabian architecture during 
the world's most prestigious telecom- 
munications exhibition, Telecom 91, 
this October 7-15 in Geneva, Switzer- 
land, The theme of the Saudi pavilion 
will be "The Cradle of Islam Speaks." 

The Saudi Minister for Post. Tele* 
graph and Telephone, Or. Alawi Dar- 
weesh Kayak said Saudi Arabia's dis- 
play would be a significant part of Tele- 
com 91, the 6th tour-yearty world tele- 
communications exhibition and forum, 

The Kingdom's teJecommunicaHons 
web, including 5,000 kilometres of 
coaxial cable and more than 450 mi* 
crowave radio towers covering 15,000 
kilometres, is considered the Middle 
East pace-setter, and one of the 
world's most modem networks. 11 is 
among the first to move towards all 
electronic telephone exchanges. It 
combines satellite, microwave radio t 
optical fibre, and submarine cable 



systems. 

Switzerland From the International 
Telecommunications Union (ITU) 
Press: With the aim of highlighting 
worldwide production of quality films 
and videos, the ITU will host Ihe 6th 
International Film/Video Festival on 
Telecommunications and Electronics: 
GOLDEN ANTENNA 91, In Geneva 
from 7-15 October 1991 . This exhibi- 
tion has met with increasing success 
since 1 971 . It is open to the 164 mem- 
ber countries of the ITU, to exhibitors at 
TELECOM 91, and to representatives 
of the telecommunication industry. 

As of 10 June the headquarters had 
received 78 entries from 1 8 countries 
and three regional organizations. 
{What I find interesting to note ts that 
Japan and the Japan Amateur Radio 
League, Inc. was the only country and 
organization to have submitted a ham 
oriented fitm/video as of June 10. Their 
presentation is onJAS-lb/FUJt-2, Am- 
ateur Satellite Communications.— 
Arniej 

Yugoslavia/Slovenia Packet mes- 
sage passed on by Ron Gang 4X1 MK 
as sent by tztok YU3FK: (The packet 
message was sent to ALL BBSs in Eu- 
rope on the subject of ' 'war and hams" 
tn Stovenia,— Arnie} The message tells 
of how She hams in Slovenia responded 
to Ihe emergency. Most of the ham 
communications were helping the 
press (some telephone lines were bro- 
ken} and the Red Cross. A tot of per- 
sonal requests were handled by the 
hams. Most of the operations were 
found on 2m and 70cm FM . and a net 
was on 3 605 SSB 

Luckily only one ham installation 
was destroyed, even though many of 
the sites were attacked because they 
were TV and communication centers. 
Even though the 23cm backbone was 
disrupted by these attacks, the 2m 



links were ready, and the YU3 packet 
network remained fully operational. No 
harm was done lo the 2m and 70cm FM 
repeaters. 

Packet node 4N3H was probably the 
first ham paokel node lo be destroyed 
in a military attack, It had four antennas 
on 23cm to 38,400 baud YT3MV 23cm 
station (4N3H-12). a 2m port on 
144.600 (4N3H), and a converse node 
4N3H-3. They were also developing a 
wide-bandwidth 19,200 baud Man* 
Chester user access node on 70cm. 

Writes YU3FK: "When unexpected 
attack of YU Army to Sloven ija hap- 
pened, the first hams reaction was: be 
GRV, stay tuned we blocked mili- 
tary repeaters and simplex channels 
on 2m . . . Later on. we were request- 
ed not to make QRM on military ORGs 
because we blocked channels so ef- 
fectively YU3 intelligence could not get 
any information from military com- 
munications. 

"As my role in packet, my first action 
was to check network, I sent a few bul- 
letins with emergency Instructions to 
BBSes. .When army started bomb- 
ing of TV and communication centers, 
where most packet nodes were, we 
prepared secondary links . < . ." 

REPUBLIC OF KOREA 

Byong-joo Cho HL5AP 
P.O. Box 4 t Haeundae 
Pusan, 612-600 
Republic of Korea 

17th World Boy Scout Jamboree 

Celebrating the 17th World Jam* 
boree. the Korean Boy Scout League 
will be operating a special amateur ra- 
dio station with help from ihe Korean 
Amateur Radio League. The special 
calfsigns will be 6K1 7WJ and 6K91WJ. 
The operation location will be KDN- 



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D22, CQ Zone 25, ITU 44 at the jamboree camp area. 

The opera t ion frequencies and modes are: SSB 
3,5 MHz-430 MHz: CW 1.8 MHZ-50 MH2; FM 28 
MHz-1200 MHz r and packet 14 MHz- 145 MHz, 
Scout club stations that will be involved are: HLQS, 
HL0YP, HL0BEJ, HLtCHD, HL0EBZ, HL8EGG, 
HLFFD, HLfiHLA and HLOJSP. 

The conditions of Issuance of a commemoration 
award are: Glass A — 6 HL call areas (HL1 -HL5. and 
a scout station) with any one of the special sta- 
tions; Class B— Any HL call areas (HU-HL5 h and a 
scout station); Class C— Only any HL stations and 
special station spelling "WORLD JAMBOREE" with 
their last suffi* letter, such as, W = HLflW, O = 
HL2AKO. R ■ HL3FUA, L - HL4LYL, etc. 

Needed to apply fa) GRC list and f RCs/S5 00 (Ko- 
rean station. W3,000) plus applicant's QSL card: (b) 
Operation perrad of commemorative station from 6 
Aug 1 991 to 1 6 Aug 1 991 ; (c) Valid HL stations from 1 
Jan. 1991 to 31 Dec, 1991, scout dub station has no 
time restrictions; (d) Application deadline require- 
ment, 31 March 1992 (effective post office date 
stamp) 

Send applications to: Mr. Young Tee, Lee 
HL4CGU. Chief Team. Amateur Radio, 17th World 
Jamboree. P.O. Box 208. Wan Do. Jun Mam, 537- 
800. Rep. of Korea 

LITHUANIA 

Jonas Paskauskas L Y2ZZ 
P.O, Box 71 

Siaultat 235400 
Uthuama 

There were TO special event stations operating 
dunng the 4th World Lithuanian Sports Festival from 
July 27 to August 15. 1991 The stations operated all 
bands and all modes using special caNsigns of 
LY91??, 

For those wishing to receive a commemorative 
pennant: in Europe you must contact ai least three 
special event stations, and North America and other 
areas must make contact with at least 2 special even! 
stations. Send your log information only and 10 iBCs 
to: Paul Pauliukonis. P.O. Box 321, Strafford NH 
038B4, USA. 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 59 



Number 1 5 on your Feedback card 



Above and beyond 

VHF and Above Operation 



CL Houghton WB6IGP 
San Diego Microwave Group 
6345 Badger fake Ave, 
S&nDi&goCA92tt9 

Parts, Kits, and Scrounging 

Most of the mail I receive is brief, and 
many of you take advantage of the 
mini-kits I put together. I hope this ser- 
vice is valuable to you, With the vast 
quantities of surplus material available 
in Southern California, I am able to ob- 
tain the components and PC board, 
minimizing the cost of the projects 

Sometimes the lime and effort re- 
quired to ferret out these items be- 
comes a consuming burden, but the 
search and acquire mission built in me 
is quite strong I look for items not in 
One's or two's, but in large quantities. 
The prime reason that I provide compo- 
nents and kits is to promote home- 
brewing. 

I try to combine Ihe basic starting 
block, a PC board, and key compo- 
nents at a modest cost to cover ex- 
penses. Some of Ihe components re- 
Quired for these microwave and VHF 
projects are not easily found in your 
local parts store. Try to purchase a chip 
capacitor in almost any city, and you 
will meet more problems than you 
started with. 

If you can't make it to a large hamfest 
like Dayton and stock up for the winter, 
you must depend entirely on mail-order 
houses or some really good scroung- 
ing. That's OK, but if you must pur- 
Chase everything on a part basis, costs 
can be quite high. 

Some of you asked about where you 
could purchase a small quantify of 
#26-36 guage wire for winding coils. 
I'd never given something this inex- 
pensive a second thought. To me. this 
item is readily available, and I never 
considered how tough it could be to 
obtain in other parts of the country, I 
buy it m a scrap metal yard at %2 a 
pound. In the future, I will include some 
wire in the kits I put together, or I'll send 
it on request, when available. Keep in 
mind that 1 am not an electronics store, 
and I don't have a full stock of compo- 
nents; I am just trying to be helpful. 

Mailbox Questions 

John VE4HL, picking up an old issue 
of 73 and reading my column, asks an 
often-asked question: 'Is the kit still 
available and the price still ihe same?" 
Bob WA4JOM asks other common 
questions: "Do you have a packet ad- 
dress?" "What are you offering the mi- 
crowave explorer?" "What is the 
price?" George KD9EN inquires about 
parts: Do you have any Gunn diodes 
or Gunn oscillator cavities?'* 

The question about price is easy to 
answer, The kits still cost the same. At 
least for the present. I haven't made 
any adjustments to keep pace with the 
increases in postal and shipping rates. 



As for a packet address, I don't have 
a packet station on the air yet. I have 
neglected this mode of operalion pri- 
marily due to my main interest in mi- 
crowave operation. 

The MOSFET(forthe switching pow- 
er supply) and the Gunn diodes are Still 
available, as are most of the printed 
circuit boards from past projects. I 
make my own PC boards, and as such, 
have many other boards available that i 
have never listed before, I have a 100- 
year-old graphic arts camera that takes 
a piece of film 1 2* x 1 0** and allows me 
to reproduce almost anything. I also 
have large quantities of sheet film, and 
can help you prepare a negative. Drop 
me a line, and time permitting. I might 
be able to help you out on one of your 
projects - 

The next frequently asked question 
is, "What is the most popular kit?" I 
believe it's the 30 MHz IF amplifier, 
Gunn modulator kit. for use with a bur- 
glar alarm type (10 GHz) Gunn oscilla- 
tor and detector, it can be used directly 
with the MaComm Gunp lexers" unit. 
See the following list for the month and 
year of the issue that this appeared in 
73. Since then, an improved PC board 
has been developed, coven ng most of 
the frills while still using the TDA*7000 
chip. This single chip FM receiver 
made this kit possible. 

About this time \ coined the phrase 
"microwave building blocks." refer- 
ring to modular components used in 
upgrading and constructing devices, 
Rather than building on a mother- 
board, the project consisted of Inter- 
connected, easy to change modules. 



Most of the kits are for constructing 
these modules. They range from sam- 
ple items to a miniature microwave RF 
amplifier for 10 GHz 

Kits Available 

Here ts a fist for your convenience: 

•1296 DBM (Oct 1987). Cost $10. 
The 1 296 MHz mixer is a 1-1 (2' square 
of 0.015" Tefion™ PC board. The dou- 
ble-balanced mixer was intended for 
1296 MHz. It works well from 450 MHz 
to 2 GHz. 

•1296 ATV Converter (Oct, 1965). 
Cost, $5 This simple voltage tune con- 
verter for ATV on 1296 MHz uses a 
single MRF-901 oscillator (the IF ampli- 
fier uses one, too). 

• 10 GHz Preamp (Aug, 1989) Cost, 
520. The 10 GHz preamp uses two 
MGF-4102 GaAsFETs with a no-tune 
destgn, giving 18 dB gain at a 3 dB 
noise figure. This ts the amplifier that I 
use for receive- in transmit, it drives my 
TWT for high power on 10 GHz SSB. 
An additional power supply for the 
preamp that uses a switch mode power 
supply for negative 9 volts (gate bias) is 
included with the PC board for an addi- 
tional $5. 

■60 kHz Antenna (Feb. 1990). Cost, 
$14. The original surplus ferrite rods 
for this kit are out of stock, A replace* 
ment exists, but it's lull-size, instead of 
five rods like Ihe original kit. The cost Of 
the full-size rod, plus additional 
postage to ensure its arrival without 
breakage, has increased the price, 
With the WWV 60 kHz. the 60 kHz an- 
tenna is a calibrator for your frequency 
counter's timebase. 

•10 GHz Fun 30 MHz IF System for 
Gunn Transceivers { April 1990). Cost, 
S10 for PC board and TDA-7000 stngie 
chip FM receiver. The 10 GHz, 30 MHz 
IF system is a single chip transceiver 
controller at 30 MHz for use with a 
Gunn oscillator on 10 GHz wideband 




On their DXpedition to Baja California, Chip NBC A and Jack NGXO spent many 



evenings camped along the beach. 
60 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



FM. It controls voltages and modula- 
tion for the Funn oscillator. The TDA- 
7000 is a complete 30 MHz FM receiver 
on a single chip. 

•CW EPROM Keyer (June 1990). 
Cost. $12.50. The CW EPROM is a 
keyer identifier with your calisign built 
in for use with a 10 3Hz wideband FM 
system. Turn on DC power, and it out- 
puts your call in low level audio to mod- 
ulate the 10 GHz W0FM oscillator. 

■FET Switching P/S (Aug, 1990). 
Cost, $15. Extra pair of FETs. S5. The 
FET switch Is a simple controlled pow* 
er supply that can be used to develop 
low power 110 AC (100W) or to con- 
struct a tore id transformer and convert 
12 volts DC to 24 volts or more. It's 
about the size of a cigarette pack. I use 
one to obtain 1200 volts at 4 mA for the 
photo multiplier part of a laser receiver 

•5,6 GHz Convener (Dec 1990). 
Cost, $15, PC board for 5,6 GHz, both 
receive and transmit MGF-1302 amps. 
Dual mixers with preamp for 2 meter IF, 
and transmit attenuator for transmit at 
2 meter drive. Requires a local oscilla- 
tor source, either crystal multiplier or 
brick phase-lock loop Design by 
DJ6EP and DC0DA p courtesy The 
North Texas Microwave Society, 

•6 GHz Brick PLL Oscillator (Dec. 
1990). Cost. $50, The brick is a phase- 
locked oscillator requiring modification 
of its output filter. (1 re- tune them for 
youj The brick requires an external 
crystal oscillator at approximately 100 
MHz. Shortly (next month) a 10 GHz 
PLL brick will be offered that has the 
internal crystal oscillator and oven con- 
trol, 

•Gunn Diodes 50 mW at 10 GHz 
(Jan. 1991). Cost, $5; 100 mW Gunn 
diodes at 10 GHz. S10. The Gunn 
diodes are still available, and the 50 
mW devices are no problem. However, 

1 am having difficulty obtaining 100 mW 
devices. In bench tests, I have to test 
about 20 devices at 50 mW before find- 
ing a hot one at 1 00 mW. 

•10 GHz Stot Antenna (March 1991), 
Cost, $40. This is a beacon waveguide 
antenna constructed from a section of 
WG-1 6 wavegu ide . It produces about 6 
dB gain, and is omnidirectional The kit 
includes all parts, a precut and ma- 
chined waveguide with top shorting 
end plate* and a gold plated brass 
waveguide (WG-1 6) flange. 

That's the list for now More will be 
added to this list in the future. I hope 
this answers your questions about the 
kits. For more information, write to me, 
or to 73 Magazine for back issues or 
copies of the articles and columns. Bet- 
ter yet subscribe and don't miss out. 

Recent Mailbox Question 

Larry (calisign pending) has heard 
that H is possible to work DX at VHF 
and UHF frequencies by bouncing sig- 
nals off the moon. He writes: "is this 
true t or is someone pulling my leg?" 

Many amateurs work moon bounce 
(or EME, Earth -Moon -Earth) from con- 
tinent to continent on frequencies from 

2 meters to 10 GHz. Look in the back 
sections of ARRL handbooks and 
you'll see equipment for this purpose. 

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73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 61 



Hams a ts 



Number 1 G on your Feedback card 



Andrew C. MacAf lister WA5ZIB 
I47f4 Kntghtsway Drive 
Houston TX 77063-5640 

OSCAR-22 Launched) 



On July 17, five payloads ware 
placed In tow earth orbit by the Ariane 
space V-44 launch from Kourou, 
French Guiana, They included the 
primary payload Earth Resources 
Satellite (ERS-1) and four micro- 
satellites. Among the microsats was 
UoSAT-F, now called UoSAT-5 or 
UoSAT-OSCAR-22. OSCAR stands for 
Orbiting Satellite Carrying Amateur 
Radio. 

The other microsats included TUB- 
SAT, SARA and ORBCOM X. They 
were mounted on the Anane Structure 
tor Auxilary Payloads (ASAP) This ar- 
rangement of mounting small satellites 
on a ring at the base of l he main pay- 
load was used successfully for the Jan- 
uary 1990 launch of six amateur satel- 
lites. OSCARs 14-19. 

TUBS AT is the first microsateHite 
built by the Technical University of 
Berlin, Its mission is to track storks (re- 
ally, storks!) with radio location bea- 
cons. II also incorporates an experi- 
mental Charged Coupled Device 
(COD) camera star tracker for satellite 
attitude determination. 

SARA is a radio astronomy satellite 
designed to listen to Jupiter's radio 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



emissions in ihe 2-15 MHz range and 
transmit telemetry on 145.955 MH& 
This project came from ESIEE SPACE, 
a Club at the French "Ecole Super- 
ieure d'lngenieurs en Electrotech- 
nique at Electronique/' Although 
ESIEE SPACE was originally founded 
to build and launch experimental rock- 
ets, the group built their first satellite in 
conjunction with the French National 
Space Agency, CNES. Some have 
questioned their use of an amateur fre- 
quency for the downlink, but it's up 
now. on the air. and can't be changed 
QRBCOM-X is a small satellite built 
by Orbital Sciences Corporation as a 
prototype of their proposed constella- 
tion of low-eanlvortHt communicatfons 
satellites. The team responsible for 
this effort included AMSAT Vice-Pres^ 
dent of Engineering Jan King W3GEY. 
Gordon Hardman K7KQ, and Jeff Zen*. 
They were all pivotal players in the 
A MS AT Microsat Project. 



A Look at UoSAT-OSCAR-22 

U-O-22 is the fifth satellite in the Uni- 
versity of Surrey series of small, low- 
cost spacecraft. It uses the same basic 
structure and electronics configuration 
as UoSAT*OSCARs-14 and -15 but 
with several differences. Originally (he 
satellite was to have no amateur radio 
operations on board. Its primary mis- 
sion was to provide PACSAT-slyle 



A 



BOVE AND BEYOND 



Continued from page 60 

Microwave Experimenters Manual 
covers EME calculations in depth, and 
gives a very good history of its develop- 
ment and applications. 

expedition to Ba|a 

Recently Jack N6XQ and Chip 
N6CA took a trip to Baja lor some DX- 
tng h which required some intensive 
navigation of Baja's narrow roads and 
nasly potholes, not to mention wander- 
ing burros Jack and Chip thought they 
were home safe when they landed at 
the Tijuana airport. (They left their van 
in lower Baja for a return trip on July 3 
for more hamming activities.) Little did 
they know that the most dangerous 
part of the tnp was about to begin with a 
Tijuana taxi trip to (he border. Jack 
stated that "The driver obviously had 
computer training, as his throttle had a 
binary control/" They almost had two 
serious accidents in the very short trip 
to the border. 

Jack reports that cautious driving re- 
warded them wkh a pleasant trip. In 
seven days they had traversed over 17 
of Baja's 24 different grid squares. 
They camped on some beautiful 
beaches, including one in DL37 for two 
nights. Finding camping spots in Baja 
Is easy, as the state is sparsely popu- 
lated and forest rangers will give you 
directions. The Sea of Cortez was no- 
ticeably warmer than the Pacific 
Ocean, The last day they spent on the 
beach in DL53, with a refreshing 
breeze. 

The QSO count came in around 250. 
with the bulk on 6 meters Nice double 
hop to the East Coast on Saturday 

62 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



morning of the contest weekend, with 
strong "E's" from DL43 to Southern 
California, Nevada, and Arizona, on 
the evening of June 11. Several sta- 
tions with whip antennas dropped pow- 
er to less than a watt. On the 12th, 
operation was from Cabo San Lucas 
DL42 and DL52, but luck ran out and 
there was no opening, Camping in 
DL53 t they caught a lew more "E" 
openings into Colorado and meteor 
scatter propagation into Phoenix and 
W5FF Thursday morning the 13th was 
the biggie, with openings into the 5, 6. 
7, and Q call areas. On the way to the La 
Paz airport, a few 2 meter tropo and 
meteor contacts were made 

One highlight of this tnp was that 
Chip worked Bernardo XE2HWB on 6 
meters, and this was Bernardo's first 
contact on 6 meters from his own coun- 
try. Later Chip and Jack met Bernardo, 
his family, and Antonio XEHWhL 
Bernardo operates from La Paz DM44 
with 10 watts and a3-element antenna. 
Chip and Jack have constructed a bea- 
con lor Bernardo, and hopefully it will 
be operational by the end Of July The 
beacon will be solar powered and have 
1 watt output operating on 50. 008 
MHz. During the solar eclipse, Bernar- 
do operated as 4B2SOL on 2 and 6 
meters. 

Stay Tuned! 

Next month we'll cover modification 
of brick oscillators. As always, I will be 
glad to answer questions relating to 
VHF/UHF and microwave areas. 
Please include an SA5E for a prompt 
reply. 



communications for medical and lech* 
meal information services in develop- 
ing countries on nonamateur frequen- 
cies. Organizations including SatelLife 
(see "OffX" m me September issue}. 
VTTA, and the National Science Foun- 
dation were involved. AM SATs former 
President Vern •"Rip" Riportella 
WA2LQO is the SatelLife Technical Di- 
rector, while Jon Metzger M UP is the 
SatelLife Ground Station Manager. 
The Health Net communications opera- 
tion is still the primary focus of the 
satellite, but other experiments and 
ham radio operations are now a part of 
the package. 

The U-O-22 Solar Cell Technology 
Experiment (SCTE) monitors the per- 
formance of a wide range of solar cells 
mounted on the spacecraft. Cells 
made from indium phosphate, galltum 
arsenide, and silicon are included to 
determine the long term effects of 
space radiation on the electrical char* 
acteri sties of the different cells Thts 
will assist future satellite designers 
with solar cell choices for future space- 
craft. The space radiation is monitored 
by RADFETS. The readings are then 
sent by the telemetry system to ground 
stations for study. 

U-O-22 carries a CCD camera. The 
images are black and white with 256 
grey levels and a resolution of 578 by 
576 pixels. The images seen by the 
camera are about 1000 miles square, 
allowing easy identification of ground 
features, The pictures are captured to 
the onboard RAM disk for later broad- 
cast to ground stations. 

The pictures are sent via packet on 
435,120 MHz at 9600 ops using Fre- 
quency Shift Keying (FSK). Image dis- 
play programs were not readily avail- 
able in the first days after launch, so 
several pictures were converted to GIF 
fries and distributed to various BBS 
systems, including CompuServe and 
the Dallas Remote Imaging Group 
(DRIG) BBS (214-394-7438). Some of 
these processed pictures were also 
uptinked to U-O-14 for transmission 
from thai satellite. U-0-22 1 s gravity- 
gradient and magnetorquer attitude 
control System provides a stable Sys- 
tem for reliable earth imaging. The 
satellite camera is always aimed to- 
ward the earth. 

Ground Station Equipment 

Stations already equipped tor activi- 
ty via U-O-14 need no changes to re- 
ceive the data, messages and pictures 
from U-O-22. New users will need a 
70cm receiver. FSK demodulator, and 
a packet terminal node controller 
(TIMC) capable of KISS operation. Al- 
though 9600 bps modems are more 
difficult to work with compared to 1200 
bps systems, more information has be- 
come available on 9600 bps systems 
from AMSAT both here and in the Unit- 
ed Kingdom. Simple omnidirectional 
antennas are adequate for U-O-22 re- 
ception. 

Several software programs have 
been in development for decoding and 
displaying telemetry from U-O-22, but 
the most important software is either 
PB.EXE or NET.EXE. These programs 



are designed to receive the Broadcast 
Protocal files sent from the satellite. 
They are available as shareware 
through BBS systems or directly from 
AMSAT-NA in Washington for a han- 
dling fee. Call (301 ) 589-6062 or write 
to AMSAT-NA* 350 Sltgo Ave, #600. 
Silver Spnng MD 20910-4703. 

Other programs of interest from 
AMSAT-UK in London include 
DTLM.EXE for displaying telemetry 
from the UoSATs and microsats, 
SPLOT.EXE for graphing telemetry re- 
sults, and U05TLM.EXE for specifical- 
ly collecting, displaying and archiving 
U-O-22 telemetry, Programs for picture 
display are expected soon. Some of 
Ihese programs may also be available 
from AMSAT-NA. 

U-O-22 Commissioning 

When U-O-22 went into orbit on July 
1 7, it was launched with all systems off. 
During the first pass over the United 
Kingdom, the ground control station 
powered the satellite up with the 7Dcm 
transmitter operating at the 2 watt lev- 
el. Data was at 1 200 bps The onboard 
computer was then activated and the 
backup transmitter turned on because 
the primary transmitter was acting up 
with intermittant output, 

After six passes over the UK, the 
data downlink was switched to 9600 
bps and several systems including the 
AX. 25 packet output and RAM disk 
were successfully activated, The previ- 
ous transmitter problems were no 
longer occurring, and all systems 
seemed operational. 

Forty-six hours after launch, the 
magnetorquers were enabled to stop 
the tumbling motion of the satellite, A 
day later U-O-22 was sufficiently stable 
to extend the gravity gradient boom. 
Unlike previous UoSATs. where the 
extension of the boom is gradual, this 
one deploys telescopicafly with one fir- 
ing to a length of 16 feet in only a few 
seconds. Gravity-gradient lock was 
achieved, and the satellite orientation 
became stable with the camera always 
aimed toward the earth, The magne- 
tometer and sun angle sensors work in 
conjunction with the onboard attitude 
Control software to maintain the satel- 
lite's position using the magnetor- 
quers. 

Four days after launch the ground 
control team began work with the CCD 
camera experiment, The first picture 
was downloaded to NK6K in California. 
It showed overexposure and cloud cov- 
er. Subsequent shots displayed spec- 
tacular views of the Mediterranean 
with excellent clarity and easily-identi- 
fiable land features. For those with 
CompuServe access, the first good 
picture file showing a clear view of Italy 
can be downloaded from Ihe HAM NET 
asCCDlA.GIF, 

By July 29, the initial phase of 
U-O-22's commissioning was com- 
plete. All the subsystems had been 
exercised and proven functional. 
Some debugging of the onboard com- 
puter and the CCD Transputer soft- 
ware continues, but for now, ihe 
amateur side of this new satellite is 
performing flawlessly. 



UoSAT-OSCAR-22 Frequency Plan 



Downlink: 

435.120 MHz 

9600 bps FSK 

1200 bps AFSK (backup) 

5 watts or 2 watts 



Uplink: 
145.900 MHz 
9600 bps FSK 
1200 bps AFSK (backup) 



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PERFORMANCE 

Performance Electronics can 
give you plenty of reasons to own 
a quad. They offer 2m r 220 MHz, 
and 440 MHz quads in easily as- 
sembled, complete kits. These all- 
fiberglass antennas have proven, 
tested designs, a 48" mast, a €0" 
pre-assembled coax with connec- 
tor, and are easily stacked for bet- 
ter gain and directivity. Designed 
to withstand a 40-foot fatl f they 



ELECTRONICS 

come with a two-year warranty. 
Customers receive personal sup- 
port for operation over the entire 
legal range and in the respective 
modes. 

Price range, $80-$100. For de- 
tailed information, write Perform- 
ance Electronics, P.O. Box 310, 
Conestee SO 29636. (803) 299- 
1072. Or circle Reader Service 
Number 206. 



HART PUBLISHING 

The 1991 Amateur Radio Mait 
Order Catatog. published every 
January and July by Han Publish* 
ing, lists 100 free catalogs along 
with equipment, businesses, pub- 
lications, and resources for hams. 
A single issue is $7, postpaid. A 
two-issue subscription for this 40- 



50-page publication is $13. Send 
your subscription payment to Han 
Publishing, 767 S, Xenon Court, 
#1 77 w Lakewood CO $022$. Send 
also your club's newsletter, or any 
news and information you think 
Hart Publishing may be interested 
in including in their catalog. 



64 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



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From ARRL Handbook, highest qlty. 
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Designs optimized for barrdwidfh. efficiency. 
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Power categories' (conservalive rahngsj 
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source, ASCII serial output can tic connected lo your 
computer. IBM compatible so ft ware included for 
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numbers IDEAL FOR UNATTENDED LOGGING 
OF YOUR AUTO PATCH TRAFFIC! 
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CAB-1 AUDIO & SERIAL CABLES $20 

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add $5 S/H - VTSA/MC ACCEPTED 
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These baluns and ununs (unbalanced-to-un- 
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Dr, Jerry Sevick, W2FMI. are improved ver 
sions of those described in his book Transmission 
Line Transformer^ .. 2nd ed. (Newmgton: ARRL, 
1990). There1ore r many new and uselul transform- 
ers are readily made available Some examples are 
balurrs and ununs with transformation ratios of 1.5:1, 
^;1.6:1 and 12:1. Many multimatch ununs are aiSO 
included. 

For a free catalog and a Ust of 48 designs 

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COMMUNICATIONS CORP, 

Spectrum Communications in- 
troduces the new, low cost 
"Specter" Series S-7R basic re- 
peater/base station. This light- 
weight but rugged desktop unit al- 
so has a 19* rack mounting. The 
S-7R is available on VHF (10, 30, 
and 15QW), midband, and UHF 
(10, 40 t and 100W), with 100% 
duty cycle. High sensitivity and 
selectivity, crystal-controlled, and 
easy to service, the S-7R can be 



interfaced to any repeater con- 
troller via the proper jack. Numer- 
ous accessories are available, 
such as CW IDer T CTCSS, com* 
munrty tone panel, additional re- 
ceiver filtering, hand mike, du- 
plexes cabinet, etc- 

Price, $1 100. Contact Spectrum 
Communications Corp., 1055 W. 
Germantown Pike t Norristown PA 
19403-9616. Tel. (215) 631-1710. 
Fax: (215) 631-5017. Or circle 
Reader Service Number 201 . 



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FIELDPIECE 
INSTRUMENTS 

Fieldpiece Instruments' HB70 
Series of heavy duty "book" type 
digital multimeters are easy to 
use, with all the capabilities of the 
meter displayed on the meter's 
face. These multimeters are built 
for use in the field. The more con- 
trol the user wants, the more he 
may prefer a manual ranging me- 
ter instead of an auiorangmg me- 
ter, especially if it's less confusing 
and easier to use. 

Meter prices range from $99 to 
$179. Fieldpiece Instruments. 
8322B Artesia Blvd., Buena Park 
CA 90621. Tel. and FAX (714) 
992-1239. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 204. 



MYERS ENGINEERING 
INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

Myers Engineering offers two 
new yagi beam antennas: the ^el- 
ement YL-143-AM for 144-148 
MHz, and the 4-etement YL-224- 
AM for 220-225 MHz. Each anten- 
na weighs about three pounds, 
permits end or center mounting 
with 50 ohm input impedance, 
and permits RF input power of 500 



watts. Front-to-back ratios are 16 
and 20 dB, respectively. 

Price per antenna, $85 plus 
shipping and handling. For de- 
tailed specifications, contact 
Myers Engineering International, 
inc., P.O. Box 15908, Fort Laud- 
erdale FL 33318-5908. TeL (305) 
572-8217; FAX (305) 572-8273 
Or circle Reader Service Number 
209. 



W & W ASSOCIATES 

W & W Associates (Batteries 
"R" Us) announces the introduc- 
tion of their replacement batteries 
for the Alinco DJ-160T/E, DJ- 
460T/E. and DJ-56Q/56QE. W & W 
battery part 0WC-5OO-EBP-1ON is 
7.2V at 700 mA. Battery part #WC- 



505-EBP-12N, 12V at 700 mA. 

The WC-50Q is $36: the WC-505 
is $49. Contact W& W Associates 
(Batteries "R" Us), 29*11 Parsons 
Blvd., Flushing NY 11354. Tel. 
(718) 961-2103; (800) 221-0732, 
Fax: (718) 461-1978. Or circle 
Reader Service number 202. 






AMERITR0N 

Ameritron announces the re- 
lease of the new Ameritron Q3K*5 
Electronic T/R Switch for linear 
amplifiers. The QSK-5 gives you 
switching over six times faster 
than a vacuum relay, and works 
with any linear amplifier. The self- 
contained OSK-5 provides full CW 
break-in and rapid switching in di- 
gital modes as well as faster, qui- 
eter switching in SS8. It operates 
on 120 VAC. handles 2500W PEP 



and 2000W CW when the SWR is 
below 1.5:1. It handles 750W on 
RTTY and packet. An optional 
cooling fan (CF-5, $40) allows sus- 
tained operation at 1500W in any 
mode. 

Price* $349. To locate your 
nearest Ameritron dealer, contact 
Ameritron, 921 Louisville Rd., 
Starkvilte MS 39759 TeL (601) 
323-5869; FAX (601) 323-6551; 
(BOO) 647-1800. Or circle Reader 
Service No. 203. 



MIDIAN ELECTRONICS 
INCORPORATED 

Midian Electronics* new ID-1 
miniature Morse Code Station 
Identifier sends a 16-character 
station ID and/or 130-character 
message at user-programmable 
intervals. The ID-1 is easily pro- 
grammed via a 12-button touch- 
tone style keypad with alpha- 
numeric characters. Other pro- 
grammable features include front 
porch delay, code speed, Morse 



tone frequency, bypass for PTT 
queing, wait period for loss of 
COR input, and automatic repeat 
intervals. If desired, the ID-1 can 
also send Morse code manually. 

The 1.4" x 1.1" x 0.25" ID-1 
costs $90. Contact Midian Elec- 
tronics incorporated, 2302 East 
22nd St. , Tucson AZ 85713-2024, 
Orders: (800) MIQtANS, Techni- 
cal Assistance: (602) 884-7981. 
Fax: (602) 884-0422. Or circle 
Reader Service Number 207. 



66 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 




is the only word to describe this: 





The MR- 10 is a Noise/QRM Reducer for 
SSB VOICE! It is the only device avail- 
able that can reduce noise and remove 
heterodynes occuring in the presence of 
speech. What makes this possible? Real- 
Time Digital Signal Processing (DSP) 
using a 40 MHz DSP chip! 

•The NIR-10 is a DSP audio processor 
that connects to the audio output of 
your receiver or transceiver and 
includes a built-in Speaker Amplifier. 

•Automatically Enhances Voice 
Reception by Reducing or Eliminating: 

Heterodynes & Tune-Ups 

White Noise 

Ignition Noise 

Power Line Noise 

RTTY Interference 

"Woodpecker" 

•Includes a Bandpass Filter Mode to 
Enhance CW and RTTY . Forms a 
Variable Center Frequency Digital 
Filter with Selectable Bandwidth. 
Provides performance that analog 
filters can*t match! 

•Work More Stations: Allows Recep- 
tion of Otherwise Unreadable Signals! 

•Reduces Listener Fatigue. 

• A Must for DXers, Contesters, and 
Field Day Ops. 

Order direct* 

NIR-IO: $395; with 12V AC Adapter add 

$12. We pay shipping. 

Orders 1-800-533-3819 
Tech 1-919-790-1048 
FAX 1-919-790-1456 

MC/Visa. Allow 3 wks for personal 
checks. Add $3 for COD. NC residents 
add 5% sales tax. 




JPS Communications, Inc. 

551 6 Old Wake Forest Road 
P.O. Box 97757 Raleigh, NC 27609 



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WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 



CIRCLE 164 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 67 



Number 18 on your Feedback card 




ARTER W BUY 



Turn your old ham and computer gear tmo cash now. Sure, you can wait for a 
hamfest to try and dump it, but you know you'll geta far more realistic price if you have 
it out wh ere 1 00 , 000 active ha m potent! a! buyers can see it than th e fe w h u nd red focal 
hams who come by a flea market table. Check your attic, garage, cellar and closet 
shelves and get cash for your ham and computer gear before it's too old to sell. You 
know you 're not going to use it again, so why leave it for your widow to throw out? That, 
stuff isn't getting any younger! 

The 73 Flea Market, Barter 'n" Buy. costs you peanuts (almost)— comes to 35c a 
word for Individual (noncommercial) ads and $1 .00 a word for commercial ads. DorYt 
plan on telling a long story. Use abbreviations, cram it in. But be honest. There are 
plenty of hams who love to fix things, so if it doesn't work, say so. 

Make your list count the words, including your call, address and phone number, 
include a check or your credit card number and expiration. If you're placing a 
commercial ad t include an additional phone number, separate from your ad. 

This is a monthly magazine, not a dally newspaper, so figure a couple months 
before the action siarts; then be prepared- If yougettoo many caHs, you priced it tow, 
If you don't get many calls, loo high. 

So get busy. Blow the dust off, check everything out. make sure it still works right 
and maybe you can help make a ham newcomer or retired old timer happy with that 
rig you're not using now. Or you might get busy on your computer and put together a 
list of small gear/parts to send to those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to the Barter W Buy, Sue Colbert, Forest Road h 
Hancock NH 03449 and gel set tor the phone catis. 



Deadline for the January classifieds Is 
November 1, 1991. 



HAM RADIO REPAIR CENTER, quality work- 
manship. Solid state or tube, ali makes and 
models. Also repair HF amplifiers, A-Z Elec- 
tronic Repair, 3638 East, Indian Schoot Ad. P 
Phoenix AZ 85013. (602)956^3024. BNB220 



SATELLITE RECEIVERS used, good for ex- 
periments- $29.00, Motor controls, $19.00, 
LNAs $10.00. Satellite Headquarters. (304) 
239-75B5. BNB231 

FOR SALE: HITACHI 35 MHz DUAL TRACE 
OSCILLOSCOPE. Paid $600, sell $300. Like 
new W. Hotine KSHH, 633 Ramona Ave,. 
#23, Los Osos CA 93402. (8051 528-61 80. 

BNB233 



WANTED: Yaesu FT-23R-HT and pre-1980 
microcomputers for museum. KK4WW. (703) 
231 -6473^763-331 1 . BNB234 

NEWf ! NEW!! NEWT! NEW!! SPEAK TO THE 
WORLD Amateur radio language guide. 
•Written especially for the ham radio operator 
•Hundreds of phrases * Volume 1 — Spanish, 
German, French, Polish, and Japanese. 
•Volume 2— Swedish, Italian, Portugese, 
Croatian, and Norwegian »Send $10.00 per 
book (postage paid). ROSE, P.O. Box 796, 
M u ndelei n I L 60060 0796 8 N8264 



CHASSIS, CABINET KITS SASE, K3IWK, 
5120 Harmony Grove Rd., Dover PA 17315. 

BNB259 



HOME-BREW PROJECTS lists for S.A.S.E. 
Kenneth Hand, P.O. Box 708, East Hampion 
NY 11937. RNB264 

QSL CARDS- Look good with top quality 
printing Choose standard designs or fully 
customized cards. Request free brochure, 
samples (stamps appreciated) from Chester 
QSLs, 310 Commercial, Dept, A, Emporia KS 
66fiQ1 . FAX (31 6) 342-4705, BNB434 

PL 259, SILVER; TEFLON USA made, 100 
pieces, $79.00. Satellite Headquarters. (804} 
239-7585. BNS666 

ANTENNA PROGRAMS design dipole, Irv 
verted-vee, quad; also labels, temp conver- 
sion, guy wire lengths makes it easy to calcu- 
late wire lengths; 5,25 360 K floppy for IBM 
compatible, $15.00 plus $3.00 S&H, Emil 
W8BVR, 6298 Old Allegan Rd, , Saugatuck Ml 
49453. (61 6) 857^2507. BNB691 



ROSS $S$$ NEW October (ONLY) SPE- 
CIALS: KENWOOD TM-241A $34990, R- 
5000 $849.90; MFJ 94a $B5.90. 207 $93.90; 
HEATH K!T SB-10DQ $6B9,99; YAESU FT- 
747GX $679.90, FT-411E $28990; ICOM 
228A $304.90, 725 $755.00, 3200A $459.99; 
TEN-TEC 425 $2, 599 90, 585 $1,789,90. ALL 
ARE MAIL-ORDER PRICES. OUR RETAIL 
SHOW ROOM WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE 
NEXT SEVERAL MONTHS. IF YOU WANT 
TO PICK UP SOMETHING, LET US KNOW 1 
DAY IN ADVANCE. CALL OR SEND 2 
STAMPS FOR USED LIST AND MORE SPE- 
CIALS, ALL LIMITED TIME OFFER, LOOK- 
ING FOR SOMETHING NOT LISTED OR 
HARD TO FfND, CALL OR WHITE. Over 
9039 harrweisied items In stock for Immedi- 
ate shipment Mention ad, Prices cash 1 
F.O B.Preston. HOURS TUESDAY-FRIDAY 
9:00 TO 6:00, 9:00-2:00 P.M. MONDAYS. 
CLOSED SATURDAY & SUNDAY. ROSS 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 7B SOUTH 
STATE, PRESTON ID 83263, (208) S52- 
0830. BNB709 



TRANSISTORS RF FOR SALE: MRF454. 
MRF455, Series Toshiba 2SC2290. 
2SC2873, and more. Looking for repair 
shops, dealers, and manufacturers. Call 
(20 1 ) 839-3360. B N B7 1 



FOR SALE; HF STATION Kenwood, Murch, 
Palomar. MFJ, etc. LSst t SASE. Jim Stephens 
W04LVK P 1184 Lockml!ler r Est in Springs TH 
37330. BNB712 

BEAM HEADINGS: Computed for your QTH 
using extremely accurate Great Circle 
method $7.00, Frank Santillo, P.O. Box 769. 
Wewtourgh NY 1 2550. BNB713 



PREMIUM QSL CARDS Unique colorful de- 
signs, starting at $75 for 250. Send Si 00 for 
catalog and samples. BVE Professional Print- 
ing. 2023 Chicago Avenue, Suite B13-4, Riv- 
ers id e C A 92507. BN B71 4 



GJANT SOLAR PANELS S44.00 EAE Excel- 
lent prices on solar equipment and acces- 
sories. $1 .00 far catalog to: Pak Rat Electron- 
ics. P.O. Box 690073, Houston TX 77260. 
(713)693-0313. BNB715 

SIMPLEX REPEATERS $149,001 We manu- 
facture them ourselves. Pak Rat Electronics. 
(713)893-0313 BNB716 

MANUALS AVAILABLE tor alt Swan, Cubic/ 
Astro, Silironix, and Atlas equipment. Send 
your request to: Brock Publications, P.O. Box 
5004, Ocean si da CA 92052. (619) 757- 
0372. 8N8717 



HAM RADIO REPAIR Experienced, reliable 
service Robert Hall Electronics. 1660 McKee 
Rd., Suite A, San Jose CA 951 16. (406) 729- 
8200. BNB751 

WANTED: Ham equipment and other prop- 
erty. The Radio Club ol Junior High School 
22 NYC, Inc., is a nonprofit organization, 
granted 601 (C)(3) status by the iflS, incorpo- 
rated with the goaf of using the theme of ham 
radio to further and enhance the education of 
young people nationwide. Your property do- 
nation or financial support would be greatly 
appreciated and acknowledged with a receipt 
for your tax deductible contribution. Please 
look over whatever unwanted equipment you 
may have, and call us, We will pick up or 
arrange shipping. You will receive the tax 
deduction, but most important, the privilege 
of knowing that your gift really made a differ- 
ence in the education and upbringing of a 
child. You are invited to check into the 
WB2JKJ CLASSROOM NET, 1200 UTC On 
7.238 MHz:, also work the "22 Crew" during 
our special event operation October 23-25. 
Write us at: The RC of JHS 22 NYC, INC. 
P.O. Box 1052, New York NY 10002 Round 
the clock HOTLINES; Voice (516) 574^tu72, 
FAX (51 6) 674-9600, BNB762 

C0MPUTALKER SPEECH SYNTHESMR 
PC BOARD $40, Motorola MEX68KEG8 
MC68000 Educational Computer Board, $25 
untested. EPROMs 2716/64, etc., Pulled 12/ 
$10. TI 32020 DSP chip and board, $20, Jeff 
Viola, 475-B Eitone Rd., Jackson NJ 08527. 

BNB771 



WANT SB-313. N7SH. (206) 843^2557. 

BNB773 



"HAMLOG" COMPUTER PROGRAM Full 
features. 18 modules, Aulo-logs, 7-band 
WAS/DXCC. Apple. IBM, CP/IU, KAYPRO t 
TANDY, CR3 $24.95. 73-KA1 AWH, PB 2015, 
Peabody MA 01 960. BNB775 

LAMBDA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB Interna- 
tional amateur radio club for gay and lesbian 
hams. On-air skeds, monthly newsletter, and 
annual gathering at Dayton. [215) 978- 
LARC. P.O. Bojc 24810. Philadelphia PA 
19130. BNBS12 

INEXPENSIVE HAM RADIO EQUIPMENT. 
Send postage stamp for list. Jim Brady— 
WA4DSO, 3037 Audrey Dr.. Gastonia NC 
28054. BN689Q 

GREAT CIRCLE MAP custom plotted in four 
colors, centered on your QTH. 22* x 24", 
Countries identified by prof Ik, Plastic laminat- 
ed. $35 ppd. Vector Control Systems. 1855 
No Mountain Suite 104-45, Upland CA 
91788. TeL (714)965-6250. BNB90O 

BATTERY PACK REBUILDING: SEND 
YOUR PACK/48HR SERVICE. ICOM; BP2/ 
BP3/BP22 $19.95, BP5/BP8/BP23 $25$$. 
BP24/BF70 $26,95. BP7$32 95. KENWOOD 
PB21 $1595, P821H/PB6 $22,95, PB25/26 
$24 95, PB2/PB8 $29.95. YAESU: FNB9 
$19.95. FMB10/17 123 95, FNB11 $29.95, 
FNB3/4/4A $36.95. STS: AV7600 $27.95, 
ZENITH/TANDY LT PACKS $54.95 "U-DCMT 
INSERTS 11 ICOM: BP3/SP22 116,95, BPS/S/ 
24/70$21.95KENWO: PB21 $12.95, PB21H 
$18.95, PB24/25/26 $19 95, TEMPOS 
$22.95, YAESU: FNB9 $16 95, FNB10/17 
$18.95. FNB4/4A $32.95. AZOEN: $19.95. 
''NEW PACKS"; ICOM BP8B [BS CHG) 
$32.95. SANTEC; 142/1200 $22.95, YAESU: 
FNB2/500 $19.95, FNB2/60Q $23 95, FN817 
$34.95. FflEE CATALOG. $3 00 Shipping/or- 
der, PA +6%, VISA-M/C +$2.00, CUNARD, 
R.0,6 80X 104, Bedford, PA 15522. (814) 
623-7000 BNB913 

WANTED: BUV & SELL All types of Electron 
Tubes. Call toll free 1 (800) 421^9397 or 1 
(612) 429-9397. C & N Electronics, Harold 
Bramstedl. 6104 Egg Lake Road. Hugo MN 
55038. BNB915 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROGRAM8-B 
disk sides over 200 Ham programs $16.95. 
25c stamp gets unusual software catalog of 
Utilities. Games, Adult and British Disks. 
Home-Spun Software, Box 1064-BB, Estero 
FL 33928. BN8917 



JOIN FAIRS— THE FOUNDATION FOR AM- 
ATEUR INTERNATIONAL RADIO SER- 
VICE. FAIRS is hams dedicated to building 
international friendship by providing techni- 
cal assistance, training, exchange visits, and 
equipment donations on a global basis. Free 
information: P.O. Sox 341, Floyd VA 24091. 
(703) 763-331 1 /3Q2-9099- BNB956 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects in 
73, Ham Radio. QST, ARRL Handbook. List 
SASE. FAR Circuits. 1AN640 Field CL, Dun- 
dee IL 6011 B, BNB96S 

SATELLITE MONTHLY AUDIO CODES 1 
(900) HOT-SHOT. Intended for testing only. 
S3 50 per call. BNB976 

AZDEN SERVICE by former factory techni- 
cian. MiCds S36.95 plus shipping. Southern 
Technologies Amateur Radio, Inc., 10715 
SW 190 St M> Miami FL 33157. (305} 239- 
3327, 8NB979 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR Fast turn around. 
Southern Technologies Amateur Radio. 
10715 SW 190th Street *9 r Miami FL 33157. 
(305)238^3327. BNB962 

IT'S BACK AND BIGGER THAN EVER: THE 
HW-a HANDBOOK. Modifications for the 
Heath HW series of ORP rigs. A must for 
every GRPer. $7.95 plus $1 .00 for first class 
postage, or DX $14.95 air. to Michael Bryce 
WB9VGE, 2225 Mayflower NW. Massitlon 
OH 44647. BNB984 

CONNECTORS UHF, VHF. BNC, TNC. TV. 
We have them all, lowest prices to everyone. 
For catalog send $2 00 refundable on first 
order to: Satellite Headqaurters, 98310 Tim- 
berlakeRd. h Lynchburg V A 24502, (804) 239- 
75S5. BNB9B7 

JUST IMAGINE YOUR OWN BLUE RIDGE 
MOUNTAIN TOP 25^acre QTH in the cool, 
green mountains. Only $975 per acre, won- 
derful view, wild game, privacy, road 
frontage, smaN stream > ideal for hamming, 
retirement, or summer home. Financing 
available, KK4WW. Floyd Virginia. (703) 763- 
3311. BNB989 

HOBBY/BROADCASTING/HAM/CD/ 
SURVEILLANCE I ransmttters, amplifiers, ca- 
ble TV, science, bugs, other great projects! 
Catalog, $1 .00. PANAXIS, Box 130-S9, Par- 
adise C A 95967. B N B991 

COMPONENTS QRO-ORP LSASE 
KA7QJY, Box 7970, Jackson WY B3001- 

BNB995 

ROTOR PARTS ROTOR service, ROTOR ac- 
cessories: Brak-O-Lays, Quik Connects, Pre- 
set mods NEW models for sale. Free cata- 
log. CATS., 736a SR 105, Pemberville OH 
43450. BNB996 

SURPLUS Huge quantities. Lowest prices in 
America. Catalogs, $3- Surplus Traders, Box 
£76, Alburg VT 05440 BNB997 

NEW RADIO BUFFS SPECIALS: AMERI- 
CA'S BEST TEN-TEC OMNLV $1850.00, 
PARAGON $1850.00, NEW DELTA 
(1399.00, ARGONAUT QRP $1199,00. 961 
POWER SUPPLY $£19 00, HERCULES II 
$1190.00, TITAN $2635.00, AUTO TUNER 
$899 OQ; JAPAN RADIO CO. JRC 135HP 
$2499.00, JRC 135 STANDARD $1599.00, 
NRD 525 $999.00, NRD 535 $1599.00; ASK 
FOR PRICE ON ALL ACCESSORIES. WE 
ALSO CARRY ICOM. MFJ, B&W. AMECO, 
COMET, KLM/MLAAGE, SPI-RO, SANGEAN, 
AOR SCANNERS^ and many more amateur 
items. CALL HENRY N4EDQ at RADIO 
BUFFS AMATEUR RADIO SALES, or write: 
4400 HIGHWAY 19A, MOUNT DORA FL 
32757. TEL. 1 (S00) 026-6433; AFTER 
HOURS, FAX 1 (904) 589-5576. OUR 
STORE HOURS ARE: MON thru FRI, 10 AM. 
till 5 P.M. EST. BNB998 

FOR SALE: SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS for 
home projects, Write for free list. John 
Kolozsvari, 3055 Tom ken Rd., Unit #304. Mis- 
sissaugaONTL4Y 3X9 Canada. BMB999 



68 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 



EVERY ISSUE 
of 75 

on microfiche! 

The entire run of 73 from October, 1 960 
through last year is available. 

You can have access to the treasures of 
73 without several hundred pounds of 
bulky back issues. Our 24x fiche have 98 
pages each and wilt fit in a card file on 
your desk. 

We offer a battery operated hand held 
viewer for $75, and a desk model for 
$220. Libraries have these readers. 

The collection of over 600 microfiche, is 
available as an entire set, tno partial sets) 
for $250 plus $5 for shipping (USA). 
Annual updates available for $1 0. 

Your full satisfaction is guaranteed or 
your money back, Visa/MC accepted. 

BUCKMASTER 
PUBLISHING 

"Whitehall" 

Route 3, Box 56 

Mineral, Virginia 231 1 7 

703-894-5777 
800-282-5628 

CIRCLE 163 ON READEH SERVICE CAR 



r/-r-rrm > jj,jjj i /jj jjji jtnt-t / *//■/ .j rr vmv if / , 



3rd Edition 

Over 150 Modifications 



Number 3 




' 



'a 



Radio / Tech 
Modifications 





Modifications for: 

Afinco 

ICOM 

Kenwood 

Yaesu 

CB's 

Scanners 

Others 



v 



Extented Frequency Coverage. 
Cross Band Repeater Mods. 
Detailed Drawings Included. 
Sold in Radio stores Everywhere 

$19.95 

Add £3 Shipping 
Visa. MC.Amer X. 




P.O. Box 1848 
Burbank, CA 91507 
(818) 843-4080 



SHORTY ALL-BANDER 



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THE PERFECT MATCH FOR 

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LONG OVERALL 



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severe storms 

Cervler red wnn too fsel ol lew loss SrAlQhm tjalanced iraJifcrTnE&idn Ime 

includes cervix insulator *i!h an eye hoot kv *.-anler supporl 

includes, custom molded insulators molcJid 01 lop quality malensl *irh 

fiigN di&leclnc qualities a-io racsllftiE weEHheratuhly 

CompJBle inslallaliorv msr.ruCiiOrii included 

Ovei3\\ lervglri /Q f^r $%$$ wtisrx ereded as An mv^fted v'CC-or skjyyr 

Hanriip-s 2 kw P£P & covers *&0 Ihrayfllr 10 m<?rei> 

May tw inmmed tn 1*1 small cily kHS 



i 
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Only $39.95 ppo 

Th* ALL-BANQER DlPOU. aH-tjand doutjler. (ype- annJGrta is lully asse-m&l 
eit overall lontjih S3S leer *nn 1 00 \m\ J50 OHM reedlme 

Only $29.95 ppd 

G5RV ANTENNA 




CIRCLE 276 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



T\\v- GSflV MULTIQAMPER antenna is gn GKceUenl all band f3 5-30 
MHz i 'D2 foot diOOfe, Qti * S MH/ the ama<ina may 0e uSad as a Mar- 
coni lyjje antenna when uS&d wnh a lunef arul a. good eadfi girxiria The 
y^c-per co>mti»n>aii<m or a 102 fool flat' top and" 3 t feel Of 30D ahm KW 
rivmle^iJ transmission Unrj actuates resonance On dll ine amateui turns 
rrorn B0 Ihrouqh 10 rnoiors wun only one an-mnna There is nc- krss in 
I raps and cats The impedance present al rfr& end ol the 301} ohm KW 
lwm*ead rransroissjofi iirte rS abouf 50-6Q ohms, a 300a maHcih Co the tQ 
1eei ol flOS>f m'm foam f,oa„ n c-urnEMi cr>mproii,|y assembled ready for 
MislaLiation ha^rJl&a 2 KW PEP and may be used m 3 ftor^C-nlal tw m 
'/er1*d V cOnl»gu/ation 

MODEL BANDS LENGTH 

GSR V -MB aO-irj 1 02 

(model il lustra led* 

gsrv ao-io »02 

<no Kfmr or caofe wilh 3t* bs\ Jeediine) 
QSPVJR JO-ID Si' S29«5pp& 

(rip xtrnr or ca&le wiib 36' oai feficilinej 

AT YOUR DEALER, IF NOT ORDER DfRECT 



PRICE 
S499S ppd 

£34,35 ppd 



VGE 



VAN GO R DEN ENGINEERING 

BOX ?1305. S EUCLID. OHIO 44131 

PHONE l'2l6f 431-6*90 FAX f^lfij 461-8329 



CIRCLE 1 20 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ilitv-YOUR BATTERY STORE 



ICOM BATTERY INSERTS 



BP-2 
BP-3 
BP-5 
SP-7 
BP-8 
BP-22 



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6.4v 
t0,8v 
13.2v 
8.4v 
8.4v 



500 ma h 
270 ma h 

500mah 
SOOmah 
800 m ah 
270mah 



$1400 
$15.00 
$21 .00 
$23.00 
$21.00 
$22.00 



KENWOOD BATTERY INSERTS 




Super Packs For 

ICOM 2SAT, 4SAT, AND 24AT 



PB-21 7.2v 

PB-21H 7.2v 

PB24Tabs 9,6v 

PB 25/26 8.4V 



200 ma h 
600 mah 

SOOmah 
500mah 



$12.00 
$15.00 
$15.00 
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BP83 

BP83-S 

BP84 

BP84-S 

BP85-S 



7.2V 
7.2v 
7.2v 
7.2v 
12.0V 



600mah 

750mah 

1 0OOmah 

1400mah 

800mah 



$33.50 
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$50.00 
$60.00 
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1 



jj|WO ^StSrSS 



DHT) ■**■: 




YAESU 



comolete packs 



YAESU BATTERY INSERTS 



FNB-3/3A 
FNB-4/4A 
FNB-10 

FNB-11 
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PECIAL EVENTS 



Ham Doings Around the World 



OCT A 



CAMJLLUS, NY VE Exams will be Nrid at Ine 
Town of Carnlllus Municipal Bldg., 4600 W. Gb- 
uqzsb St . start! ng at 7 PM , Test fee for Technician 
through Extra class is $5.25. Talk-in on 1 47.300. 
Contact John Pstchett KB2ERJ, (315) 487- 
0298. Please bring two forms of ID and a copy of 
/our license- 



OCT 5 



GAfTHERSBURG, MO A PC Fast Computer 
Show will be held at the Montgomery County Fair- 
grounds from 10 AM-4 PM. Admission t$ $6 for 
adults, children under 10 admitted tree Spon- 
sored by Shows, Inc., PO Box 832049. Delray 
Beach FL 33483. (407} 24 1 - 1080. 

BALDWINSVJLLE, NY The Radio Amateurs of 
Greater Syracuse (RAGS) will hold its 36th Ham- 
test al the Tri-Gourrty Convention Center from 9 
AM -4 PM . Flea-M arkel set-up is 4-1 PM F it and 
6:30-3:30 AM Sat. All indoors, Wheelchair acces- 
sible. Pre-register lor VE Exams. For info call 
(315)409-0590. Talk-in on 1 46.31 /.91 MHz 



OCTS-6 



BILOXi, MS The Mississippi Coast ARA r Inc. 
will hold the ARFL Mississippi Slate Convention 
and 15th annuel Ham^Swap Fest at Point Cadet 
Plaza Sat. Oct 5 from 8 AM-5 PM and Sun. Oct. 6 
from fl AM-2 PM. FV parking. Free admission. VE 
Exams Sat. & Sun, (Pre-register) Talk-m on 
146. 13/. 73 repeater. Contact Charlie Kunz 
AA5QJ, 0337 Chaucer Dr., Ocean Springs MS 
39504-2306. (601) 377-6495 days; (001) 676- 
9516 eve*. 

CHARLOTTE, NC The 4Qth annual Rock Hill 
SC Hamfest/Computerfafcr will be held at the Char- 
lotte Knights Baseball Stadium Sat. trom 9 AM-S 
PM; Sun. 9 AM-3 PM Advance tickets $6 per 
adult , S7 at the gate, valid bolh days (parking in- 
cluded). VE Exams (by pre-registrationj Sat- at 1 
AM Talk-in on 147,03 (down .600) Rock Hill r&. 
peater. For tickets and exam registration, send an 
SASE and make check payable to YCARS, 2129 
Squire Rd, , Rock Hilt SC 29730. 



OCT 6 



SPRINGFIELD, OH Tha Springfield Indepen- 
dent Radio Assn. will hoid their 9th annual Mani- 
fest indoors at the Clark County Fairgrounds, Rte. 
41 , just N ot I -70 , si a rt ing at a AM . Sellers admitted 
at 6 AM. Tickets $4 In advance, $5 at the door. 
Tables $7 in advance^ $8 at the door. Talk-in on 
1 44 85/145 45 and 222 66/224.26- Contact Ralph 
Pamer WA6KSS, (513) 325-1456, or SASE to 
SIRA, PO Box 523, Springfield OH 45501. 

HUNTINGTON, IN The Huntington County ARS 
will sponsor its annual Hamfestatthe P.A.L. Club 
on Riverside Dr., from 8 AM-3 PM. Free parking. 
Handicap accessible. Set-up al 6 AM. Advance 
tickets £3.50, $4 at the door. 8 ' tables $5 each on a 
first come,, first served basis. VE Exams for all 
classes. Talk-in on 146 r 0S5 J 085 and 448 975/ 
443,975. Contact Jim Covey KC9GX, 1752 
KocherSL, Huntington IN 46750: 

YONKERS, NY The Yonkers ARC Ham fair will 
be held from 9 AM-3 PM at the Yonkers Municipal 
Parking Garage, corner of Nepperhan/Main St. 
Admission £5 h under 12 free Flea Market space 
$1 per space (bring your own table). Set-up al B 
AM. Mo advance registration. VE Exams from 12 
PM-3 PM at the 1st Precinct Police Station, E. 
Grassy Sprain Rd. (between Jackson Ave. & 
Tuckahoa Rd.), TaJk-inon 146.855- Or 440.1 5- 
WB2BNH repeater. Contact Y.A.R.C, PO Box 
378, Centuck Station, Yonkers NY 10710. (914} 
903-1021. 

CHERRY HILL, NJ The Mt, Airy VHF Radio 
Club, inc. (The Pack RatsJwiH sponsor the Hama- 
rama '91 Hamtest from OAM-4 PM at the Garden 
State Park (Rl. 70 & ComeU Ave). Parking $1; 
Admission £4; Flea Market space $8. Contact Al 
BobttttKSEQD, S3B9LangdortSr.< Philadelphia 
PA 19152. (215) 742-3312, 



OCT 12 



GRAND FORKS, ND The fore ARC wilt hold its 
annual Hamf est at tha City Auditorium from 9 AM- 
5 PM. Talk-in on 1 46 34/91. Contact John Engel 
WAtLPY. 816 Bth St. SE. E. Grand Forks MN 
56721. 



MINDEN. HV The Sierra Intermountain Emer- 
gency Radio Assn. will host I he Sierra Hamf est/ 
Computer Fair at the Carson Valley Inn on Rte. 
395 from 9 AM-3 PM. Commercial spaces $35, 
individual spaces (if available), $15. General ad- 
mission $3. Swap Meei will be outside, in front of 
the RV Park; spaces $5 Contact Ed Rogers 
W6FPT, (702) 266-3061 or Duncan tnstey 
WA6RRU. (702) 207-4223. Talk -in: Ask for 
WGFFTorWAORRU an 147.330+ MHz. 

BROOKLYN PARK, MN The 7th annual Harrv 
tasT Minnesota & Computer Ekdu, sponsored by 
the Twin Cities FM Club, Hamlest Minnesota and 
Computer Expo, will take place as Hennepin Tech- 
nical College. 9000 Brooklyn Slvd. F*ae parking. 
Advance tickets $4.50, $6 at the door. The Expo 
will feature two guest speakers: Robert Locker, J r 
W9KNI, and Carole Perry VVB2MGP. Double 
Decker Fieamarket at $1 2, $ 1 5, $1 8 pe r table (de- 
pending on location). VE Exams. Talk-in on 
146.1 Si. 76 repeater, Contact Hamtest Minneso- 
ta a) Computet Expo, POBox 5598, Hopkins MN 
55343. ($12)535-0637, 

TEANECIC NJ Fairieigh Dickinson University, 
1000 River Rd., will be the site ot a Hamf est spon- 
sored by the Bergen Amateur Radio Assn, from 8 
AM-2 PM. Buyer's admission £2. children free. 
Sellers $8 per space , Free parking. VE Exams 
from 8 AM-10 AM, walk-in only: contact Fere 
Adety K2MHP, 13-30 Edward St., Falriawn NJ 
07410. (201) 790-0622 before 10 PM. TaMn gn 
W2AKR 146.790. For Info, contact Jim Joyce 
K2ZO. 288 Ridgewood 8tvd. No., Westwood 
NJ 07675. (201) 064-8725. 



OCT12-13 



MEMPHIS, TN MemFest 'Si-Greater Memphis 
Amateur Radio/Computer Show, sponsored by 
I he Mid-South AR A , wi II be held in the Pipkin Qidg . 
at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. Open Sal. from 9 
AM^4 PM; Sun. 9 AM-2 PM. Admission is $5 at 
the door, VE Estamsand forms. Flea Market tables 
$16 per table for the weekend. Contact St&¥e 
ChBeseman NX3W, 4880 Cromwell, Memphis 
TN 38118. (901) 305-0621. Talk-In 146.28f.6S 
and 443,00/444.00. 



OCT 13 



E. LIMA, OH The Northwest Ohio ARC 
(NOARC) will hold their annual Hamtest at the 
Allen County Fairgrounds, Rte 309; 1V4 miles 
east of 1-75. Wheelchair accessible. To register tor 
Exams, send completed 610 and copy ol license 
with check or M-O- for $5.25 to VE. Mai I to W8TY. 
1370 Stevlck Rd., Lima OH 45807. Or phone 



(419) 330-1 336, Tables are $9 full and $4 half 
table Reservations can be made by sending 
SASE with check or MO to NOARC t PO Box 
211, Lima OH 45801. 

WEST FRIENDSHIP, MD The Columbia ARA, 

(CAR A), will hold a Computer Show, Electronic 
Expo and Amateur Radio Convention at the 
Howard County Fair Grounds (off Rte. 1 44j , from 8 
AM-3:30 FM. Outside Flea MarketfTaitgaiing 
space $10 per space, includes 1 general admis- 
sion. General admission $5 (Spouse and children 
tree). 1-4 tables $20 each; 5 or more $18 each 
(includes 1 vendor admission per table). Conta-ci 
CAR A Hamf est Committee, PO Box $1l t Co- 
lumbia MO 21044. (301) 53U293& 

WALL TOWNSHIP, NJ The 4th annual Shore 
Area Ham/Computerfest, sponsored jointly by the 
Jersey Shore ARA, Neplune ARS A, Ocean-Mon- 
mouth ARC, and the Garden State ARA r will be 
held at the Allaire Airport, Rte. 34, from 0800- 
1 600 . Sel-up at 0600. Parking tef cars and ai rcraft , 
Advance tickets $5, $6 at the gate. XYLs and kids 
under 1 2 admitted free Tables $20, inside hanger 
with power available. Taiigating spaces $i0each. 
VE Exams. Talk-in on 145.1 to KC2Q, for cars: 
UNICOM 123.00 MHz, for aircraft. For reserva- 
tions contact Shore Area Hamtest, PO Box 635, 
EatontownNJ 07724-0635. For info call Al Jack- 
son NK20, (908) 922-8121. 



OCT 19 



GRAY, TN The 1 1 1h annual TrhCrtieS Hamfest, 
co-sponsored by the Kingsport, Bristol, and John- 
son City Radio Clubs, will be held at the Ap- 
palachian Fair Grounds located oft 1-181, RV 
hookups. Admission $5. Mail inquiries to POBox 
3682 CRS. Johnson City TN 37002. 

AUGUSTA, GA The ARC of Augusta GA will 
sponsor the Augusta Hamtest/Computer Fair at 
the Augusta-Richmond County Civic Center tram 
9:30 AM-5 PM, Advance Tickets $4, $5 at lha 
gate. Kids 12 and under free. Dealer tables $10 
each plus admission ticket . Set-up starts at 6:30 
AM. For reservations contact Roy Hiilis N4VSN, 
Rte. 1, Box 58, Girard GA 30420, (912) 009- 
426 h Tailgaling space free with admission ticket. 
WCARS/VEC Exams at 10 AM. For info contaci 
Jim Abercrombie N4JA, PO Box 5943. Augusta 
GA 30906, (404) 790-7802. Talk-in on 145 45, 
alternate 1 45.49. 

COTE ST. LUC, (MONTREAL) QUEBEC, 
CANADA The Gote St Luc ARA will sponsor 

Hamtest "fll at St. Richards Church, 7070Gueiph 
Rd., from 9 AM-3 PM. Flea Market set-up at 8 AM 




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Admission $£. Tables $1 2 (includes 1 admission). 
Talk4n on VE2RED 147,270/147 B70 Contact 
Joe Ship VE2JS, 5637 Metiing Ave., Cote St. 
Luc, Que. H4W2C1, Canada. (514) 482-6500, 

GARWOOD, ISM Tne TCRA HamfestfFto Mar* 
ket. sponsored by The Tri-County PA, will be held 
at St. Anne's SehooJ on Cedar St. from 8 AM-2 
PM. Donation $3, children under 12 (with parent) 
Ire*. Reservations required for tailgating. Walk-in 
VE Exams start at 9; 30 AM. Bring check for S5.25 
payable lo 'AFRL VEC" (except for Novice £x* 
am), your original license (plus Xerox copy if you 
went to keep your original); 2 forms of JD b pencils 
and a pen Tables $8, $1 with AC. Contact Dick 
Franklin W2EUf> 23 Shawnee Rd.. CrantordNJ 
07016. (90S} 276-6522. Talk-in on 147. 255/. 355 
and 146.52. 

TACOMA, WA The Radio Club of Tacoma will 
sponsor its 2nd annua) Electronics Ffaa Market 
from 9 AM-3 PM at the Camp Murray Armory (exit 
122 West, off Interstate 5). Free parking. 
Overnight parking $2. Admission S3 H children un- 
der 13 free. VE Testing at 10 AM (wafk-ins ok). 
Talk-in on 147 .98/. 38. Call Ken Moak WA2J0W. 
(2Q6) 581-6494 or write Co the Radio Club ot 
Tacoma, PO Box 1 1 183, Tacoma W A 98411. 



OCT 19-20 



EL PASO, TX The International Hamfiesta will 
be heid at the El Maida Shrine Temple Convention 
Hall. 6331 Alabama Si., Sat. From SAM-5FM, and 
Sun. I ram 8 AM-3 PM. Tickets $5 in advance, $6 
at the door. Tables $5. Tailgate spaces $5 each. 
VE Exams both days. PV parking. Talk-in on 
146.88 repeater. QCWA Breakfast. Contact Chris 
Hines NSLZB, Box 31628, El Paso TX 79831. 
(91 Si 584-3824. 



OCT 20 



CAMBRIDGE, MA A TAILGATE Electronics, 
Computer andi Arnaleur Radio FLEA MARKET, 
go-sponsored by the MIT Electronics Research 

Society, the MIT Radio Society, and the Harvard 
Wireless Club, will be held (rain gr shine) from 9 
AM-2 PM at Albany and Main St. Free off-street 
parking. TaiFgating. Sellers $5 per space in ad- 
vance, SB at Ihe gate (includes 1 admission.) Set- 
up at 7 AM. MaiF reservations before Ocl. 5th to 
WlGSL, PO Box 82 MIT Hft, Cambridge MA 
02138. For Info call (617) 253-3776. Talk-in on 
146.52 & 449.725/ 444.725-pl 2A-W1XM re- 
peater. 

BENSALEM, PA The Penn Wireless Assn. will 
Sponsor the 3rd annual Tradefest '91 at the Yezzi 
Athletic Fieid on Rte .513(1 mile so utn at Rte . 1 32} 
Irom 8 AM-2 PM. Set-up at 6:30 AM. Outdoor 
tailgating. VE Exams. Admission $3, $7 per car- 
load, kid's 12 and under free. Flea Market spaces 
£5. Premium or multiple spaces guaranteed by 
advance payment, For advance sales, send 
checks w/SASE to PWA Tradefest '91, PO Box 
L-734, Langhorne PA 19047. Talk-an on 145 .25/ 
-0.6 and 14652 simplex. Contact Steve, (215) 
752-1202. 

KALAMAZOO. MJ The Southwest Mich ART 
and tne Kalamazoo ARC will co-sponsor the 9th 
annual Kalamazoo Hamfest at the Kalamazoo 
Central High School, starting at 8 AM. Set-up at 6 
AM Directions: US 131 to M-43 r east to Drake 
Rd., then north to the school. Free parking. Ad- 
vance tickets £2. $3 at the door. Tables Sl/tt. $4 
minimum. Send requests and payment with SASE 
before Oct. 13 to Gary Haieiton KB8PL, $7332 
32nd St., Lawton Mi 49065. Make checks 
payable to Kalamazoo Hamfest. 

CENTRAL! A n IL TY\% Centralis Wireless Assn., 
trie, and Kaskaskia College R.E.A.C.H. Club will 
co-sponsor a Hamfest al the Kaskaskia College 
Q ym nasi urn , Shattuc Rd, . beginning at B AM . Set- 
up at 7 AM. Free parking. Flea Market space w/1 
table. S5. Admission/Main Prize tickets are $2 
each or 3/$5. Mail ticket orders with an SASE to 
Centralia Wireless Assn., inc., Hamfest Tick- 
ets, PO Box 1 166, Centralia tL 62801 Talk-in on 
147.27/87 and 443 2/44S.2 For info contact Bud 
King WA9U, (818) 532-8806, or write to CWA, 
inc. at the above address. 

TUCSON, AZ The 4th annual Tucson Hamfest, 
sponsored by the Old Puebfo Radio Club, will be 
held at I he DeAnza Drive- In. from 7 AM-1 PM. 
ARCA Meeting. Sellers $4 per space, Buyers $1 . 
Talk-in on 146.22AS2. 146.28/.S8, 146 52 sim- 
plex. Contact A J, Pawlowski KB7KZ, 3418 W. 
Green Trees Df. t Tucson AZ 80741. (602) 742- 

2605. 



OCT 26-27 



WEST PALM BEACH, FL The Palm Beach Re- 
peater Assn. will sponsor the Palm Beach County 
Hamfest Amateur Radio/Computer Shaw Sat- 
from 9 AM-5 PM, and Sun. 9 AM-3 PM, at the 
South Florida Fair Grounds Expo Center, Set-up 
is Fri. from 2 PM-8 PM, Free parking, RV full- 
hookup sites. FCC Exams begin at 9 AM both 
days. Advance tickets $4, $5 at the door. Tickets 
are valid both days. Ftea. Market tables are $15 In 
advance, $17 at the door, if available. Tables valid 



both days. Tatk-rn one hour before Hamfest hours 
and one hour before set-up hours, on 147,165/ 
.765 repeater with 145,520 simplex for close-in 
work Contact Vi Kiekenapp KC4LCF, (407)585- 
9074. 

CH ATTA NOOG A , TN The 1 3th an n ual H amfest 
Chattanoga Amateur Radio Convention {an ARRL 
sanctioned Hamfesl) and ARRL Delia Division 
Convention, will be held in the South Hall of the 
Chattanooga-Ham illon County Convention and 
Trade Center. ARRUVEC Exams given both days 
at 9:30 AM ($8.25), Send 610 form, checker MO, 
and copy of license with any instant-upgrade info 
for all exams lo BHt Wiggins N4BMP, PO Bex 
23121, Chattanooga TN 37422, by Oct, 22nd. 
Please specify either Sat. or Sun. as desired exam 
date. No walk-ins, Bring original license and posi- 
tive ID with you. Flea Market tables are SI per 
day, SiS per weekend: electrical power is $25 
extra. For Flea Market info call Prank Gray 
KC4 TV, (6 15) 899- 79 1 7 between 6 PM and 1 P M 
only. Talk -in on 146.1 9/. 79. For Hamfest info write 
to Hamfest Chattanooga, PO Box 3377, Chat- 
tanooga TN 37404. For exhibitor info call Barbar- 
as Gregory WA4RMC, (815) 629-7911 during 
work hours, or (615) 892-8889 eves. 



OCT 27 



SELLERSVILLE, PA The RF Hill ARC will spon- 
sor a Hamfesl at the Pennsylvania National Guard 
Armory, PA Rte. 152, starting at 060O. Set-up at 
0600. Admission $4. Talk-in on 1 45.3lO r 146.330. 
146. 520 simplex. VE Exams, indoor and outdoor 
Flea Market. Contact Bob Buonfigiio WG3X. 361 
School House Rd., Souderton PA 18964. (215) 
723-1016 eves. 1800-2200. 

MARION, OH The Marion ARC will hold its 1 6th 
annual Heart of Ohio HamfestyComputer Show 
from 0800-1 500 hours at the Marion County Fair- 
grounds Coliseum. Tickets $3-50 in advance, 
$4.50 at the door. Tables $7. Talk-in on 146.52 
simplex or 14 7. 90/. 30 repeater. Contact Dan 
Burns N8JMF, 344 Robinson. Marion OH 
43302, (614)382-2384. 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 



NOV 2-3 



CHARLOTTE, NC The new Amateur Radio Ed- 
ucation Center at the Discovery Place science 
museum will celebrate its opening by operating 
from noon { Eastern Time) Nov. 2- noon Nov. 3. 
The Mecklenburg ARS will operate the station as 
W4BFB, primarily on phone in the bottom 50 kHz 
of the General phone subbands on 75, 40 and 20 
meters and around 23.400 kHz. ForGSL and Cer- 
tificate, send OSL card and 9sM2 SASE with 2 
units of first class postage to Ralph Eubanks, 
6021 Coatbridge Lane, Charlotte NC 28212, 
USA 



OCT 



VERMONT Special Event Stations from Ver- 
mont will be operating 25 kHz up from the bottom 
of the Novice and General bands to help celebrate 
Vermont f s 20Oth Birthday. RTTV/AMTORetc will 
be in the digital subbands. To Obtain a Special 
Bicentennial Certificate, send St and a SASE to 
Amateur Radio Bicentennial Project, PO Box 
200, GranitevHle VT 05654. Foreign stations, 
send only SAE and IRC's to cover postage. 



OCT 5 



OZARK, AL The Date County ARES wil 1 operate 
WD4NXrJ 14Q0Z-2300Z lo commemorate the arv- 
nual Claybank Jamboree Arts and Craft Show. 
Operation will be in the 40, 20 and 15 meter Gen- 
eral HF Subbands and the Novice 10 meter phone 
band . For QSL, send co ntact n u mber and SASE to 
Special Event. W04NXN, 208 Cherry Lane, 
Ozark AL 36360-28 1 1 . 



OCT 5-6 



CAPE COP. MA WB1U will be operating from 
the Marconi Wireless Station site at South 
Wellfleet (starting 1400Z} to commemorate its 
90th Anniversary (construction started in 1901 J. 
Frequencies: General portions of 15, 20, and 40 
meters (lower 25 kHz) and the Novice portions of 
10 and 90 meters. Far Certificate, send QSL and 
9x12 SASE to flay Hlfson, 6 Sherman Place* 
NorwalkCT 06851. 

PITTSBURGH, PA Trie Breezesnooiers ARC 
will operate W3XX from the USS Requin SS4B1 , a 
Trench Class WWII submarine, from 1400Z- 
2200Z each day, to celebrate the opening of the 
Carnegie Science Center Frequencies: 2B.495, 
21.365,14. 245. For a QS L card send a n S AS E to 
WB3LHO, 326 Sunset 0r. r Bethel Park PA 
15102, 

BRUNSWICK, MD The Brunswick Radio Ama- 
teur Groups are planning special event operations 
for the annual Brunswick Railroad Days Celebra- 
tion, Brunswick Hams will be signing with location 
on phone and 7BSWK" on CW from home QTHs 
and the festival grounds. Frequencies: 28.300/ 
.325 MHz (SSB) in the daytime; T 4. 250/ .265 MHz 
fSSBJ ,7100/115 MHz (C W) and 3. 6757. 700 MHz 
(CW) evenings and overnight, plus local VHF and 
UHF, For a commemorative photo QSL of 



Brunswick Museum's Centennial Quilt, send QSL 
to BRAGS, POBox 143, Brunswick MO 21716. 



OCT 12-13 



QU ILCENE , WA The West Seattle ARC will op- 
erate Station W7AW during the "Guilcene Slug 
and Oyster DX Festival" from 1600 UTC-0400 
UTC Oct. 12 and 1600 UTC -1900 UTC Oct. 13 
Frequencies: 7.225, 14.225, 21.125. For a com- 
memorative QSL Certificate showing a friendly 
slug and oyster at play, send QSL and a large 
SASE to B. Todd, 3719 59th Avenue SW, Seat- 
tle W A 98116. 

COLUMBUS. OH The Columbus ARA will oper- 
ate Station WBTO in conjunction with the Colum- 
bus USA Festival, from Ocl 12 at 0000 UTC-2400 
UTC Oct. T 3. Frequencies: 7.240, 14.340.21.375. 
10m Novice phone band A commemorative QSL 
is o tiered to those who confirm contact with 
WflTO. A Certificate will be sent to stations who 
contact at least 10 Columbus area stations. 
Plaques will be awarded to the two stations mak- 
ing the most contacts. Exchange name. QTH and 
Signal report. Send QSLs and logs to Roger Dz* 
wonczyk WB2EIG. 283 East Longylew Ave., 
Columbus OH 43202, USA. 

ROBINS AFB, GA The Middle Georgia RA will 

operais KN4IE from the Museum of Aviation from 
i£00Z-2000Zto remember and preserve aviation 
history on the 44th Anniversary of the breaking of 
the sound barrier, Airpower or aviation notables 
may be on the air tor this event. Frequencies' 
{SSB} 3944, 7244 r 14244, 21344, 2S&44; (CW) 
3644 . 7 1 44, 1 4 1 44, 2 11 44 , and 28244 , QF M/QR N 
permitting. For a unique QSL card and/or certifi- 
cate signed by World War II Ace and GodfS My 
Co-Piiot author BGen. Robert L. Scott, Jr., Re- 
tired, QSL with SASE to OaveShiplett WL7ACY. 
POBox 1078, Warner Robins, G A 31099. 



OCT 13-19 



GILMER, TX Hams of Upshur County will oper- 
ate N50ZK in conjunction with the 54th annual 
East Texas Yamboree, Operation will be in the 
General portion of the 40 and 20 meter phone 
subbands, and in the Novice ifl meter phone sub- 
band For a certificate Send QSL and a 9x1 2 SASE 
to KB5PAD, Rte. 2, Box 1 14, Diana TX 75640, 



OCT 16-20 



UNION , K Y The Northern Kent ucky ARC will op- 
erate K4CO 1 400-21 O0Z from Big Bone Lick 



State Park in conjunction with the annual Salt Fes- 
tival. Operation will be on 40, 20, 10 meters, and 
147.375+ repeater. For a certificate, send 4x9 
SASE and contacl number to NKARC, PO Box 
1062, Covington KY4109 1. 



OCT 19 



ALCATRAZ ISLAND/PRISON The Sacramen- 
to ARC will operate from the Officer's Dining Hall 
of Alcatraz Prison 1700-2300 UTC Three trans- 
mitters will be on SSB frequencies 7-240> 14,280, 
21.350 and 23,350 as best propagation permits. 
QSL with SASE 10 S.A.R.C., PO Box 162903, 
Sacramento CA 95816. 

WEST LAFAVETTE, JN The Purdue ARC will 

operate W9YB from Ihe campus of Purdue Univer- 
sity 1400-2200 GMT. to celebrate Homecoming 
Weekend. Frequencies: 7.2S0, 14.280, 21.380, 
and 28,480 MHz {±20 kH2) during the day as 
propagation and QRM allow. W9YB, located in the 
West Tower of the Purdue Memorial Union, is 
open to campus visitors at this event. 



OCT 19-20 



ATHENS, GA The Athens RC will operate 
WA4BKF to celebrate Athens' most unusual prop- 
erty owner, the "Tree That Owns itseff." Opera- 
lion will be in the General portions of ihe ao-15 
bands and Novice 10 meter. For special QSL, 
send QSL and No 10 SASE lo Bin Strickland 
WA4FVT, 355 Segrest Cir. t Athens GA 30605. 



OCT 23-25 



NEW YORK CITY, NY The 22 Crew" operat- 
ing WB2 J KJ tram the HQ of the Rad io CI ub of JHS 
22 will celebrate the nth anniversary al the Club 
and their educational program EDUCOM. Join 
them on 7 233 from 1200-1330 UTC then On to 
21,395 till 2000 UTC, Wed. Ihru Thurs. For an 
awesome QSL and surprise package, write to RC 
of JHS 22. POBox 1052, New York NY 10002, or 
FAX it to us at (51 6} 674-9600. 



OCT31-NOV1 



BREVARD , NC The Transylvania County ARC will 
operate W4EHV to celebrate Halloween from the 
Devil's Courthouse in Transylvania County Operat- 
ing hours will be from Oct. 31 at 21 002:^02007 
Nov. 1 Frequencies^ (SSB) 3.660; 1 4.295, 21 .365. 
28.335, 50.150. 144,25; and 146.52 FM Simpfex. 
VHF Packet, KN4GC V NCAVL2.NC. For certifi- 
cate, send a legal size or 9x1 2 SASE to W4EHV, 
Erik Hansen, PO Box 10 T Sapphire NC 28774. 



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72 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October, 1991 



Continued from page 46 

capacitance, and set both switches to about 
the center of their ranges. 

With the transceiver adjusted for a few 
watts output on CW, key the transceiver and 
adjust both wafer switches for the lowest 
SWR indication. Then, adjust CI while 
changing the position of one or both wafer 
switches, one position at a time, until the 
SWR is as low as possible. This usually will 
be L 1 : 1 or lower with most installations. 

There may be more than one pair of switch 
positions which produce an SWR below 
1.5:1. Although 1.5:1 is satisfactory for all 
modern transceivers, changing one or both 
switches a single position one way or the 
other should allow adjusting CI for an even 
lower SWR indication. 

Although it may be necessary to change the 
positions of the wafer switches when going 
from one end of 80 meters to the other, on the 
higher bands a slight adjustment of C 1 should 
allow the SWR to be brought back to L 1 ;1 . 

Conclusion 

The low-pass antenna tuner is an efficient, 
wide-range, easy-to-butld-and-use accessory 
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to feed random wires as well as low- and 
high-impedance end-fed antennas. Because it 
also reduces harmonics by as much as 20 dB, 
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73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 73 



R 



Number 20 on your Feedback card 



TTYLOOP 



Marci. Leavey, M,D„ WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Baltimore MD 2 1203 

Frequency Specification 

Boy. did I open a can of worms a few 
months ago? Last July J asKed for your 
opmions on specifying RTTY frequen- 
cies. 

To recap the problem, for those who 
may have come in late, the question 
was raised as to whether tfte mark, the 
space, or somewhere in between, 
should be used to specify the frequen- 
cy of a RTTY signal 

Edwin R. Ran son KSER of Mustang, 
Oklahoma, writes The question of 
how to specify an amateur HF digital 
signal's frequency has been kicked 
around at least as long as I have been 
on digital modes, and that's since 
1966. Back then. II was pretty standard 
to specify the mark tone as the operat- 
ing frequency, but that was before the 
days of digital readouts and frequency 
counters becoming so common. We 
were lucky to know our operating fre- 
quency within a kHz (in those days, a 
kHz was called a 'kc ) 

"I can tell you how the military and 
the NTIA (the Federal Government's 
equivalent of the FCC) specifies fre- 
quencies. It is the center frequency of 
the occupied spectrum. For example, 
for a voice upper sideband SSB emis- 
sion, the assigned frequency would be 
1 .5 kHz above the (suppressed) earner 
frequency, since the signal occupies 
the spectrum between the (sup- 
pressed) carrier frequency and Ihe car- 
rier plus the highest modulation fre- 
quency. (Voice bandwidth is con- 
sidered 3.0 kHz wide.) So, if your carri- 
er frequency is 14,300, the assigned 
operating frequency would be 
14.3015, For CW. FM. and AM modes, 
the center of the occupied spectrum is 
the carrier frequency, so the assigned 
frequency and the carrier frequency 
would be one and the same 

"The same method is used for all 
emission types, including FSK modes. 
So, if your mark is on 14,070, thai 
puts your space on 1 4 06983 (with a 
170 Hz shift, with a low space frequen- 
cy), and your operating frequency is 
14.069915. What's the dial read on 
your transceiver? Depends on the 
scheme you are using, and, if you have 
a RTTY mode, the scheme the manu- 
facturer used. Confusing? Not realty 
for channelized operation Figure it out 
once, program it in, (or order the right 
crystal) and you're there. 

"But for ihe way we amateurs oper- 
ate, thai method leaves something to 
be desired. Personally. I think it makes 
more sense to specify the mark fre- 
quency as the "operating' frequency, 
because that's something you can 
measure with a counter. Since there 
are several different modulation 
schemes, the standard should be the 



Amateur Radio Teletype 

lowest common denominator. Whatev- 
er we use, there should be some sore 
of standard, so when you want to find 
the station who said he would be on 
14. .074, there is an unambiguous un- 
derstanding of what that number 
means/' 

Another opinion was proffered by Kit 
Kohl moos W61SG. whose work we 
have enjoyed as well in these pages. 
Kit writes. "I suggest that you consider 
what the FCC monitoring station wilt 
hear jtoj determine the answer When J 
am setting my frequency close to a 
band edge, I always calculate the ex- 
treme limit of my transmitted sideband 
in the direction of the band edge, then I 
set the transmitter frequency so that 
there is at least a 1 kHz guard band 
beyond the limits of my signal, 

"Its obvious, therefore, that with AF- 
SK the operator should center the indi- 
cated frequency about 4 kHz inside the 
lower band edge if the shift is down, 
and vice versa if [he's] near the upper 
band limit and shifting up 

As if not lo be outdone, the August 
1991 issue of OSTcarries an article on 
page 2B, entitled "What Your Frequen- 
cy Display Realty Tells You." Covering 
much of what we have brought up, 
asked about, and speculated upon, 
this five-page article answers some 
questions, raises a few more, and 
fleshes out the topic nicely. It's good 
reading, and I recommend it to anyone 
who is interested. 

On the flip side, Kit is looking for 
an 'elementary cartridge and in- 
terface. . .to put a C-64 on RTTY, 
AMTOR, and CW/' He's been running 
a Sinclair ZX81 with software by AF8J 
and a home-brew interface, but finds it 
subject to occasional strange tricks 
which he supposes are due to "RFI. 
punching the wrong key, or just the 
whims of nature/' 

A related question comes from J.R 
Popkin-Clurman VE7YT of Ganges, 
B.C.. who is another C-64 owner. He 
writes thai he ". . . recently acquired a 
Commodore 64. 1 have had a Kantron- 
ics UTU a number of years, but have 
never tried to use it until now, 

"I would greatly appreciate it if you 
will tell me how to marry the Com* 
modore 64 and the UTU so I can use it 
for AMTOR. I am presently on RTTY 
using a 28KSR with an ST5000/' 

Segues ng into AMTOR. a Mr. Felsen- 
fafd from Yorittown, Hew York, is look- 
ing for some introductory texts and cur- 
rent newsletters on AMTOR. 

For all these, I turn the floor open to 
you all While I recall a number of sim- 
ple cartridges and the tike for the C-64 
in years past, I have no idea if these are 
still available A company called Mt- 
crolog. located here in Maryland, pro- 
duced one such device. I can find no 
trace of Microlog at present- 
As to texts, I realty know of no single 
source other than those reviewed in 



this column in the last few years. Read- 
ers (and authors) aware of such materi- 
al are also invited to keep me posted on 
new developments in ihe field of pub- 
lished information. 

Try a New Band 

And finally, a proposal. David Ovad 
NP2H of Blairstown. New Jersey, 
writes that. ".. Jn reading 'RTTY 
Loop* m the August issue of 73 J find 
myself in full agreement with William 
Martin N7EU. I also have found little 
AMTOR activity on either 30 or 40 me- 
ters I will sometimes call CO many 
times on 30 meters especially, only to 
find no one is on the band I know the 
band is open as I use it to tog on to N WA 
(APLINK) on 10. 1405. When I do find a 
QSO. the other person is as surprised 
as I am to find activity 



"Maybe we should declare Thanks- 
giving weekend an HF digital 'Try a 
New Band 1 weekend. I say let's give 20 
meters a little breathing room. With the 
sunspol cycle declining, 7 and 10 MHz 
will become more and more valuable, 
propagation-wise, ' * 

As they say, Dave, "Use iter lose it!" 
Our dear Wayne has been promoting 
wider band use for years Maybe it's 
about time we listened to him, 

More on tap for next month, in- 
cluding more software, and more 
input from you all. Keep me posted 
on your digital activities, and let me 
know what you think of a digital 
Thanksgiving Drop me a note at 
the traditional mail address above, 
or CompuServe (75036,2501) Or Del- 
phi (MARCWA3AJR). I'll be lis- 
tening! 



H 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



AM HELP 



We an nappy ro provide Ham Help tmtings 
tree on a space avatlabie basts to make our 
fob easter and to ensure that your listing ts 
correct piease type or print your request 
clearly, double spaced, onatuiijSWuii*} 
sheet of paper. You may also upload a listing 
as Email to Sysop ro the 73 BBS mamhelp 
SiG (24QQbaud. & data btts. no parity, t stop 
btf (603} $25-4438} Use upper- and tower- 
case letters where appropriate Also, print 
numbers carefully— a T, tor example, can be 
misread as the tetters t or i, or even ihe num- 
ber 7 Thank you for your cooperation. 

The Commodore/Vic 30 Ham Radio User 
Group has software for trade Shareware or 
public domain ham- radio-related software on- 
ly All disks are on S% " format. Don al ions to 
the library are welcome. Write to Howard S, 
Bacon KC4CtQ, 213 Holly Ave t So Pittsburg 
TN 37330. 

WANTED: Any Mind ol HF, UHF. or VHF 
radio equip men t that you no longer need. 
This Is needed to help gel a now-defunct high 
school ham club back on the air. Please help 
by donahng to Boget Bacon H,$, Ham Club 
W8MTM, c/o Dan Getteifmget N8NTL, 3623 
PrmgleDr, Cincinnati OH 45231 Thank you 

NEEDED; Manu alf schematic tor EICO 368 
Sweep Generator I wiM pay lor ihe effort. C. 
Chadmck N4GTX. PO Son 1381, Palatine )L 
€0078, (703} 358-3603 

WANTED Schematic lor Drake Model 2C 
Receiver I will pay copying and mail i n g costs, 
Larry K&th KF8BX, 4251 Meadowsweet Or, 
Dayton OH 45424 (5 J 3) 233- J 143 

My husband ts in the Air Force so I am 
studying for my Nov»ce license while sta- 
tioned in the Netherlands L m a complete be- 
ginner and would appreciate a nam rad>o 
pen pat" to help me along Mrs Suzanne 
Dtckerson, 32CSG. PSC 75 Bo* 1726, APO 
AE 09719 

Pastor of small country church desires to 
communicate with missionaries in Brazil and 
Mexico, but ts on a limited budget II you have 
an older HF ng gathering dust, can you help? 
Contact Pastor S4iCtiaetCroweijNSUJA t 4510 
FM 19S4-R1 6. Wtthita Falls TX 7630 1 (817) 
322^*606- 

Any MlUTAfiYfDOO active or retired Hams 
wishing information on operations in Ger- 
many, 4 frequencies, equipment license re- 
quirements, etc > send SASE lo Robert Dick- 



Your Bulletin Board 

son Ret.. PSC t Box R-4988. APO AE 
09009*4988 

Members of Ihe Oregon Region Relay 
Council continue their drive for funds, to do- 
nate a fully operational 2m repeater lo the 
Khabarovsk Amateur Radio operators of the 
Soviet Union The Khabarovsk area of the 
Soviet Union does not currently have any re- 
peaters Please send donations to Oregon 
Region Relay Council inc-. PO. Box 25451, 
Pontand OR 97225-045 1 . 

I would [ike to be in contact with other hams 
who enjoy on-going role-playing games If 
you are interested in joining, write me and 
let's set up a sked Doug Brown KC4RSL Rt 
4 t Box 533. Commerce GA 30529. 

WANTED: A copy of the manual tor the 
Heath SB-63Q Station Console. BobSchlegel 
N78H, 2302 286 St. E, Roy WA 98580 

I would like to purchase copies of Popular 
Electronics and Electronics illustrated maga- 
zines which were published between 1963 
and 1983: also schematic/data on a Royce 
Model 1-406 H-T SW transceiver (manufac- 
tured Apr 1977) Thank you ft E Casseis 
KA5JTX. P.O.Box 7 h Atoka OK 74525. 

I am requesting an operator's manual for 
the Yaesu FT-209RH 2-meier I will pay copy 
and postage costs. Thank you. Vicente Lopei 
NP4MZ, 60 Moore St.-5J, Brooklyn NY 
11206. 

EROC, the Environmental Radio Opera- 
tor's Coalition, has started a net on u 330 
MHz every Saturday at 1 900Z The EROC net 
ts designed to promote goodwill between am- 
ateurs and to promote environ mental aware- 
ness through the friendly discussion of topics. 
This net also handles traffic- Please fom us in 
a cause worthy ot amateur radio's use If you 
are interested m helping the EROC directly* 
wTTte the net manager, Greg Beaver N8LAS. 
164 Maptewood Of . East Lansing Mt 48823, 
or call [5 1 7) 351^7785 

WANTED: Schematics only, for Galaxy GT- 
550, and/or power supply AC -400 and RV550 
VFO I wiEl pay lor copying and postage 
Stephen Brzoska N2MHQ, 27 Willow St . 
Washington NJ 07882 

I am requesting an operator's manual for 
the Yaesu FT-2Q9RH 2 meter I wilt pay copy 
and postage costs. Thank you Vincent Lopez 
NP4MZ 60 Moore St . 5J. Brooklyn NY 1 120$ 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 




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73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 77 




Number 22 on your Feedback card 



Mike Biyce WB6VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
MasSiihn OH 44646 

HW*9 Thump Suppressers 

The mad has been running heavy tatety 
since the word has gotten out the HW-9 is 
no more. Take it from me, if you hear of 
or get a catalog in the mail from Heath 
with the HW-9 listed for sale, they're all 
gone. What uniis Heath did have were 
sold at the Dayton Hamvention in no 
time. If you're lucky enough to have an 
H W*9. we might as well do a little bit of fix 
up work on il 

When the HW-9 goes to transmit, the 
audio line is shorted to ground via Q303. 
resulting in a rather Joud thump, Jack Leu 
KH6CP has a simpie and easy fix to sup- 
press this thump. He just added a JFET in 
series with the audio line. Instead of 
grounding the audio, he opens it up. A lot 
or HW<9$ have Zacks thump suppresses 
installed. 

Another version of the thump suppress* 
er comes from Paul Levesque KB1 MJ. Irv 
stead of using a JFET to open the audio 
line, Paul used a 4066 CMOS chip (see 
Figure 1 ) This chip has several switches 
inside By wiring up the different switches, 
he mules the audio while at the same time 
creating an opening in the audio line. This 
chip also eliminates the thump from the 
HW-9 's audio See the schematic for more 
details 

Bandwidth Improvement 

Paut has atso fmproved the HW-9's ex- 
cessive bandwidth. He writes: 

Perhaps the most annoying fault in the 
Heath HW-9 Is its excessive 3 kHz band- 
width and the desensitizing of the receiver 
via AGC driven by strong signals in the 
passband . 

'Tve been quite successful with the 400 
Hz, 3-pole crystal filter suggested by Wes 



Low Power Operation 

Hayward when driven with a high gain FET 
in order to simplify the required changes. I 
can now operate on 40 meters at ntghu a 
feat found to be impossible with the origi- 
nal desjgn See Figure 2. 

"I have purchased a small quantity of 
crystals and have matched them very 
closely in sets of three in order to provide 
optimum filter performance. Three crys- 
tals and the two 680 pF capacitors I have 
mounted to a small PC board create a 
'drop-in replacement' for the original 
Heath fitter FL301, A high gain FET from 
the J SOB family provides a direct substi- 
tute tor Q301 , and increases Ihe IF gain. A 
small toroidal transformer established the 
Impedance match between the FET and 
Ihe input of the crystal filter, 

"lean provide a limited number of com- 
plete parts kits with step-by-step mstruc- 
lions for this conversion to the HW-9 users 
who are interested in improving the selec* 
tivity and AGC function of their trans- 
ceivers Keep *n mind you'll forfeit the abil- 
ity to Copy SSB with this modification. The 
cost of the kit is S26, Write me a note if you 
are interested in more details. Should the 
demand exceed my supply, orders will be 
honored in the order received." Write Paul 
Levesque KBtMJ ai 14 Wesley Street, 
Dedham MA 02026 Don t send your lev 
ters to me; route them to Paul for the filter 
modification. 

Calming the Transmitter 

Tve received several letters and even 
some phone calls about transmitter insta- 
bility in the HW-9. There is really no one 
fix, but rather several fixes that rmghf cure 
the instability Some HW-9s, like the one I 
owned, exhibit no instability. I think some 
cases of Instability may be traced back to 
how the rig was assembled. 

When there is instability, it seems to oc- 
cur mosiiy on the 1 5 and 10 meter bands. 
Adjusting the drive above 3 watts on ID 



TYPICAL 1 POLE FllTEfl RESPONSE 




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Figure 2, The audio response with the KB1MJ crystai filter cirewt 



meters will slam the meter alt the way over. 
This is a good indication ot instability. If 
you have a high SWR on a resonant an ten* 
na. but a good SWR into a dummy load, 
you've got instability problems, too 

Several fixes may help you cairn down 
your HW-9, First, re-sokier the PA compo- 
nents as dose to the board as possible. 
Excess toad length wilt cause problems. 
Also, change Q402 to a 2N44Q1 transistor. 
St nee the circuit seems to be quite sensi- 
tive to transistor parameters, more than 
□fie might have to be tried. In real stubborn 
cases, try changing C434 to a slightly 
smatler value. Check the temperature of 
the PA's heat sinks. If one is really hot, and 
t h e other is cold , you might have o n e d ead 
final transistor. This makes the other one 
work harder, upsets the design parame- 
ters of the PA stage, and results in trans- 
mitter instability. Both heat sinks should 
be comfortably warm after a live minute 
QSO 



TO RJ ARM 



QRIGMAL CIRCUIT 




ML)Tt 



TO A3 ARM 



70 E3*B 



mp roved ctmojir 




SAME AS ABOVE 



MUT£ 



Figure 1. The key-thump suppressor for the HW-9 Courtesy ot Paul Levesque K& rMj 



The driver stage, 0404. uses inverse 
feedback in the form of R4 u and C432.TG 
reduce the drive, decrease the value of 
R414, Go down in small amounts; you 
don't want to reduce the drive to the point 
of reducing the power output. These fix- 
es" should calm down the HW*9*s trans- 
mitter. 

Looking for Trouble 

How, what about the HW-9 that will only 
put out one watt? Try inserting an amme- 
ter in series with the supply leads If the 
input current is excessive, with little RF 
being produced, your best be I is to start 
looking at diode D407 for the source ot the 
trouble. If the diode goes bad, almost all of 
the power from the transmitter goes to 
iransformer T404, Nothing bad happens, 
but youll only see a watt or Iwo on any of 
the bands. 

Some of the modifications you may 
have done to improve the sensitivity of the 
HW-9 T s receiver call for replacing the 
diodes in the front end T/R switching 
scheme. The diodes are low power Shot- 
tky diodes. If you have replaced D407 with 
the Shottky diode or the recommended 
HP 5082-2835 diodes, D407 will fail Diode 
0407 requires at least a 50 vol I rating. 
There's a lot ot RF across it during trans- 
mit 

Since Heath has dropped the entire line 
Of ham kits, many of you have written to 
me, asking for schematics for the 
HW-7, HW-8. and the HW-9 Heath will slUI 
sell you a copy of the HW-7 manual for 
St 7.50, Manuals for the rest of the QRP 
rigs should also be available. I don't know 
about parts. Heath tells me they only stock 
parts for five years after production ends. 
Call Heath for more details if you're look- 
ing for parts. 

1 have about 200 copies leH of the Hot 
Water Handbook (containing modifica- 
tions for the Heath HW series of rigs). After 
they're gone, that's Itl There'll be no more 
printed. If you want a copy, send $8,95 to 
me, Mike Bryce WB8VGE, at the above 
address. 

Since we have covered both the HW-8 
and the HW-9. pick up one a I the ham test 
They're a lot of fun to fix and modify, and 
with the days growing shorter, tinkering is 
especially fun 



78 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1991 




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Ate VBT Ssy Dte Continued from page A 

the technology of the information age. 
Yet I feel I'm getting nowhere in help- 
ing this desperately needed growth. 
We're seeing a spurt now as a result of 
the no-code license, but I had 10 fight 
the ARRL for that damned thing for 30 
years. Heck, we wouldn't have a Novice 
license now if it hadn't been for FCC 
Commissioner George Sterling W1A£ 
jamming it down the ARRL throats 

Once you understand how our Amer- 
ican system works, it's easy to make 
money. Pathetically easy. And, at the 
same time, you can do things which 
need to be done to improve the world 
I've been working on improving ama- 
teur radio and, my ego says, having 
occasional successes. I'm working to 
improve the music, the publishing, and 
Ihe educational businesses. 

When you work smart you have time 
to play too, so it being apple season 
right now. I'm spending a couple hours 
a day canning my homemade apple- 
sauce the best in the world. You 
know, I should plant a whole orchard of 
Golden Transparent apples and go into 
the business of making this apple 
sauce. There's nothing like it at any 
price, and it lasts perfectly for years 
when you freeze it, if you stop by and 
say hello, 111 give you a taste and com* 
pletely rum your acceptance of canned 
applesauce for life. Hmmm, let's 
see . . . if each tree will make about 300 
quarts every two years ... 

No, I've got to stop coming up with 
new business ideas. Did I tea I you about 
my "Hurry Curry" business? Probabiy 
not, since someone would surety make 
zillions with it H and all I'd get would be a 
1 % chance at gratitude. Thai's a good 
one to save for my old age. 

Tell you what: If you'd like to take off 
a few days and talk with me about 
building amateur radio, making mon- 
ey, and such trivia, you're invited to 
attend Ihe 161h Annual Winter Ham 
Colloquium in Aspen. February 1-8. 
We'll ski during the day, HTs in hand, 
in order to clear our minds for the stren- 
uous evening dinner conferences. Just 
be there and check in on the local re- 
peater tor conference details. Chuck 
KOI I will lead Ihe expert skiers. Til be 
in charge of the aged and infirm who 
have to stick to the intermediate 
slopes Just one more year and I get to 
ski free! 

Shooting The Messenger 

Having had a note from a reader 
about his frustrations in trying to get 
Bell Helicopters lo correct a fault in the 
wmng harness of a new helicopter. I 
was interested to find that he'd been 
laid off and that the V-22 he warned 
ihem about crashed on its maiden 
flight. 

In talking with amateurs in govern- 
ment, the military, large corporal ions 
and educational institutions, I've found 
many (most) of them frustrated by poor 
management and waste. Their frustra- 
tion eats at them because they hate to 
see things going wrong, but feel help- 
less to do anything about il . They know 
what happens to whistle-blowers, and 
it isn't pretty. 




QSL of the Month To enter your GSL mat! it in an envelope to 73, WGE Center Forest Road, Hancock. NH 03449. Attn: 
QSL of the Month. Winners receive a one-year Subscription {or extension) to 73. Entries not in envelopes cannot be accepted 



One enormous source Of bureau- 
cratic waste, for instance, is the frantic 
spending of allocated funds at the fis- 
cal year end. Bureaucracies work on 
the basis of ever-increasing funding, 
They know if they don't spend every- 
thing allocated, their funding will be cut 
the next year. The people working in 
these bureaucracies understand the 
system, but they also hate it. No one 
tikes to see money wasted . . . not even 
public money. The punishment of whis- 
tle-blowers enforces a conspiracy of 
silence. 

I'm sure there were many people 
who knew what was going on with the 
savings and loans., .and many well 
aware of the BCCI scams. They also 
saw what happened to the few people 
who were foolish enough to try and 
wave the red flag. The lucky ones just 
got fired 

I suppose you haven't bothered to 
read PJ. O'Rourke's recent Parlia- 
ment of Whores, so you don't know 
what a fake the federal budget is, and 
how Congress is a willing part of this 
whole scam. (You've also probably 
heard of Parkinson's Law, but have 
you ever read his 1957 book? Great 
stuff!). 

P J. tells us that the emperor has no 
clothes, that the whole mess is ba- 
loney He makes a solid case, And from 
the endless horror stories I've heard 
from hams working in the government 
and the military. P.J. is not exaggerat- 
ing. One of the things I recommended 
as a way to help balance the budget 
was to set up a federal whistte-Wowers 
protection program. . .perhaps relo- 
cating them just as they do helpful 
criminals. After all, to bureaucrats, 
whistle-blowers are criminals. 

If President Bush ever gets more in- 
terested in solving our national prob- 
lems than in curing those of Cyprus, 
this might be a good starting point, I 
doubt there is a government agency 



other than the FCC that wouldn't be 
enormously improved by cutting its ap- 
propriation by 10% per year for the 
next ten years. That would cut them 
down to about 35% of what they get 
today, and it probably would all have to 
go to pay the generous government 
pensions. The drop in paperwork alone 
wou Id a How m i IHons of ac res of Canadi- 
an forests to rag row 

And The Post Office 

While we're cleaning up the mess in 
Washington, let's lean on congress to 
take away the monopoly from the post 
office. That'll put it out of its misery in 
short order. We might even start ex- 
changing QSL cards again. 

Private industry could do an infinitely 
better job at a fraction of the cost. Old- 
timers can remember when we'd con- 
tact someone and automatically send 
them a OSL card. I'm old enough to 
remember the penny post card. Many 
of my old QSL cards have 3c stamps on 



There used to be dozens of major 
QSL Card printers. H was a nice busi- 
ness for a retired ham. All it took as a 
Kelsey press and a classified ad in a 
ham magazine I've still got my old 
press out in the barn somewhere, com- 
plete with several targe trays of type. 
Boy, that was fun! 

Perhaps it's getting time to build fax 
modems into our transceivers so we 
can end contacts with faxed QSLs. We 
could fill in the "card" on our comput- 
ers (any kind) with the call, report, and 
a short message. Anyone up to writing 
an article on the details? Yep. it'll be 
black and white for now, but color print- 
ers are getting cheaper, so we'll even* 
tually be able to swap full color QSLs. 
That'll save us about 30c on local QSLs 
and much more on DX QSLs. I can see 
Ihe day coming when well be able to 
work all continents in ten minutes and 
have the QSL cards in hand to prove it. 



Yes, I hear you old grouches grum- 
bling about the cheats Look, fogies, 
we've always had cheats. So what? 
I've been issuing DX awards for over 
35 years, so Tve seen the lengths some 
hams will go to. Weird . 

I'm already on record as favoring lim- 
iting DX credit just to contest week- 
ends. Then we can ask the rarer OX 
ops to send in disks with their logs and 
let a computer sort it all out. We're not 
worried about the 200 easy countries, 
just the 200 hard ones. I predict that the 
ARRL will be set up to handle DXCC 
disk logs about 12 years after we lose 
our last DX band 

The Rescue 

During the freshman year in many 
colleges, the fraternities invite you over 
to meet them . and to see if they want 
you as a pledge. This is called "rush* 
ing." I visited a bunch, looking for one 
where J might fit in. The Dekes had a 
well-earned reputation for being 
drunks, The Alphas were snobbish rich 
kids . . , even had their own bowling al- 
ley in their frat house And so M went 
until I got rushed by Phi Ep. They 
seemed more my style, so I pledged 

The freshmen all Irved in the fresh- 
men dorms the first year. Then those 
who didn't make it into a fraternity 
moved to the uppercase dorms. The 
students separated into the Greeks 
and the Geeks. 

My prospective fraternity brothers 
loved the hazing, making life miserable 
for us pledges. This consisted Of mak- 
ing us uncomfortable psychologically 
and physically. For instance I was 
given about ten minutes to learn the 
Greek alphabet, interspersed with a 
good deal of 'assume the position," 
which was followed by all the batting 
strength our best ball players could 
muster. I still know the Greek alphabet, 

I suspect that if ham clubs would ap- 
ply this system to new members to get 



00 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1991 



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them to learn ihe code we'd solve that 
problem. 

One standard hazing routine was 
to take the pledges out and get them 
lost. So about one in the morning 
one cold snowy night four ot us were 
blindfolded and driven for about a halt 
hour and then two of us were dropped 
off on a back country road. Tha car 
drove off with the other two, leaving us 
In the snow t with no hint as to which 
way to walk. There wasn't even a glow 
m the sky to head for. Worse, there 
weren't even any other tire tracks in the 
snow to suggest that more cars might 
come along. We sighed and started 
walking. 

About five minutes later we saw 
the lights Of an approaching car! At 
this time of night they'd never stop, 
but as it zipped by we tried to flag it 
down. It skidded to a stop and a voice 
shouted back. "Hey Wayne, is that 
you? 1 It was Car-mine Mirenda 
W2MAM. from the next fraternity down 
the street from ours. 

Carmine dumped out his two 
pledges and picked us up. It turned out 
that this was a popular pledge dumping 
spot- My feWow pledge and I earned an 
extra beating for getting back to the 
fraternity house before the brothers 
who had dumped us. No. we never ex- 
plained how we did it, but we sure had 
the laugh on them. Our other two 
pledges dragged themselves in the 
next afternoon. If Carmine hadn't rec- 



ognized me we'd have gotten back 
around the same time. 

Though Phi Ep was in an oto beat-up 
brown stone house in a crummy section 
of town, and it was aoou! the only non- 
national fraternity . I didn't mfnd. I found 
I'd picked well when the next year we 
won the intrafraternity sports trophy, 
the intrafraternity scholarship trophy, 
and got our president elected the 
Grand Marshal of the school. We 
capped that by buying the ex-gover- 
nor's mansion, moving to the most ex- 
cfusrve part of town, and becoming a 
Sigma Chi chapter. 

I'm afraid my grades dtdn t help us 
with Ihe scholarship trophy, and my 
bowling (195) as third man on the team 
wasn't a big boost toward the sports 
trophy, but my modulator powered 
one heck of a public address system, 
filling the campus with hi-fi sound 
and election propaganda. 

It had been tough putting up anten- 
nas in the brown stone row of houses, 
but in the new house there was enough 
room for me to put up two 20 meter 
Twin-Three beams. I worked out like a 
bandit- I had both a 75m kilowatt 
(203Zs) and an all-band kilowatt (8 f 3s). 
I put out a humongous signal on aJt 
bands Those homemade W8JK Twin- 
Three beams were killers, 

Alas, Carmine, who weighed in at 
around 400 pounds,, not surprisingly 
won the coveted Silent Key award 
while he was still quite young. 




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Is No-Code Working? 

Yep, so far. Looking at the new li- 
cense figures from the FCC for Ihe 
February-June period, I see lhat 1989 
went up 2% over i98fl, 1990 went up 
9% and 1991 is up 56%. That's a big 
jump. May was up over 100% from last 
year Will it last? The mail I'm getting 
from clubs around the country is en- 
couraging. 

Clubs are reporting substantial in- 
creases in their licensing classes. Gel- 
ting "em to send me pictures lo prove it. 
is harder than getting 'em to organize 
group subscriptions to the magazine. 
Despite almost every family in America 
having a camera, getting dub pictures 
of ham classes has so far turned out to 
be a bust. 

I'm getting two kinds of letters about 
no-code. One is from old-timers who 
are still convinced that no-coders will 
turn our bands into CB-iike messes. 
The other letters are from readers who 
have been in contact with these new 
licensees and axe impressed by what 
good operators they are. 

I'm also getting stacks of letters 
from no-coders thanking me for help- 
ing make their license possible. 
And every one of them has men- 
tioned that now they're working on 
tha code so they can get their Novice 
and get on 10m.. and then their 
General. The letters from the old- 
timers who are still living in their dream 
(nightmare) world and who have made 
no effort to check what's actually 
happening are in wonderful contrast to 
the others. 

I'm hearing from more and more 
clubs with license classes filling up. 
Who knows, this enthusiasm may not 
be a temporary blip, But we still have a 
long way to go before we're anywhere 
near the growth we had from 1946- 
1S64. before the ARRL's "Incentive Li- 
censing" debacle killed the American 
radio industry. 

Now we have an answer for the kids 
who argue that the code is a useless 
relic of the past. No problem; get your 
ticket and join the fun on 2m and up. It 
gives us a little easier "sell" to young- 
stars who turn up on CB and find it 
frustrating. 

Has your club appointed some 
hunters to prowl 1 1m, looking for new 
meat? CB is prime hunting ground for 
potential hams t but you hive to catch 
H em quick, before they get fed up and 
quit. 

One more thing. Let's not inculcate 
these newcomers lo 2m with the really 
rotten things some old-timers have al- 
most developed into an art form. Like 
not answering when a newcomer calls 
in on the repeater. 

Let's see, where was I the other day? 
Oh yes. Mew York. \ was way up high in 
the Empire Hotel by Unco in Center 
and was able to kerchunk a dozen re- 
peaters. I gave my call and asked If 
anyone was listening, \ got answers on 
two repeaters. Two! One was in New 
Jersey. And no, no one was avoiding 
rne. I don't think anyone ever gets my 
cali right the first time, and few hams 
recognize it even when they do finally 



get It Maybe 1 0% put W2NSD and WG 
together. 

Look here, this is a hobby with all of 
us fraternity brothers, so let's be friend- 
ly, helpful and make hamming fun I 
really hate it when I need to get word 
through that I'm going to be fate to 
meet a friend tor dinner; only to get 
refused by hams and have to ask 
CBersto get help, which they cheer- 
fully do J" 1 1 bet t won't get turned down 
by a no-coder . unless some bozo 
gets to 'em first and louses up their 
head 



National Park Proposed 

The inside word is that the League 
directors are considering submitting 
a proposal to the FCC which would 
set aside the upper half of the 75m 
phone band as an Old Hams' 
Home. ,,a retirement community 
made up of retired hams who are too 
unskilled! too lazy, or too poor to spend 
what's left of their unproductive lives 
playing gotL 

Theirs is a force which some direc- 
tors feel should be harnessed. There's 
even been talk of establishing special 
teaching channels along the edge of 
theOd Hams' Home where they would 
be able to instruct ham newcomers on 
proper language. . with guest lectur- 
ers imported from 14,313. 

Baxter K1MAN may be asked to 
prepare tapes for 24-hour-a-day broad- 
casting on a reserved channel, 
with endless readings from the cur* 
rent issues of OST including all the 
ads. Baxter's great experience in 
non-stop broadcasting on the ham 
bands makes him eminently qualified 
for this service. 

I understand lhat Dick Bash may be 
available to teach youngsters how to 
pass the 20 wpm code test without any 
knowledge of Morse whatever. And a 
special channel Is proposed for making 
deals with VECs for mail-order exams 
so all certifiable Old Hams can get their 
Extra Class lickets without being over- 
charged. 

The unfortunate FCC dampdown 
on the KP4 license mill has forced 
ticket prices beyond the reach oi 
many old-timers. Extra Class, which 
used to go for only Si 00 is now 
more like $500, which Is still a bar- 
gain for the top-oM he-line license. . . 
hassle-free. Advanced seem to be 
going for around $250. And no, don't 
bother writing me to find out where to 
buy your license 

Special net channels 3nd limes will 
be established and enforced for the 
discussion of no-code, CBers, space 
cadets, lids. K1MAN, KV4F2, AM, 
women, homosexuals, blacks, athe- 
ists, Japs, A-rabs, DX lists, contests, 
net jamming, etc. 

Facing reality, the directors are said 
to be favoring a 10 kW power limit for 
this National Park Band. Since some of 
them already qualify to operate in the 
band, perhaps they don't want to have 
lo operate just with their exciters to be 
legal. Seems reasonable to me. 

Please send your comments to 
K1ZZ, ARRL, Newmgton CT 061 11 
with a copy to me. 



82 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



Number 23 on your Feedback card 



Ask k a boom 



Michael Geier KB 1 UM 
%?Z Magazine 
Forest Rd. 
Hancock NH 03449 

More Parts 

Last month, we were discussing 
pans and how to manage them Let's 
finish it up: 

KeepChippin' Away 

Along with digital chips, analog or 
■'linear" ICs also abound. For in- 
stance, most walktes today make use 
of the LM386 chip for their audio output 
sections. In some, a "rear LM386 is 
used, while in others, smaller versions 
and surface-mount chips with the 
same internal construction are em- 
ployed As with the digital chips, the 
am mended part numbers may obscure 
the generic type. For instance, the 
Kenwood TH-77A dual-band waikie us* 
es the NJM386BM, while the Yaesu 
FT-411 has the MJM386D The Ken- 
wood also uses a couple of TC40668F 
chips, which are just common 4066 B 
anafog switches, although they may be 
surface-mount mini chips (I haven't 
opened the rig to find out). 

Also found are plenty of op amps. 
These, too. often have common nun> 
bers embedded in their designators In 
any case, anytime you want to replace 
a chip with one you think is essentially 
the same, be sure to compare the 
schematics for the pinouts first. Even If 
I he chips do turn out to be functionally 
identical, there can be different 
pinouts, particularly when package 
types are different. 

What Has Three Legs and Amplifies? 

While there are lots of chips In our 
gear, many other semiconductors are 
used as well. Obviously p one of the 
most important is the transistor. Per- 
haps no other category of part has as 
many types as does the ibree-J egged 
beast. I can't begin lo cover them all 
hBre f but Til try to touch on the major 
kinds- 

Bipolar, or •'common," NPN and 
PNP transistors are still the most often 
used. They can be found in just about 
any part of a radio's circuitry, from the 
front end to the audio amp. Nearly all 
voltage regulators, RF output stages 
and discrete audio output amps are 
made from bipolar transistors. The 
standard three-legged diagram with 
the diagonal leads and the arrow is the 
giveaway, If the arrow points Out, the 
part is NPN; if it points in, it is PNP. 
What does this mean? It refers to the 
polarity properties of the internal semi- 
conducting tayers, and the shorthand 
gives you a clue as to which polarities 
must be applied to make the device 
turn on. To make an NPN transistor 
turn on, the base (which is the ,k P" «n 
NPN) must be positive with respect to 
the emitter. To turn on a PNP. the base 
must be negative with respect to the 
emitter, Note that it doesn't matter 
what the "actual" polarity (with respect 
to circuit ground) is; only the emitter is 



The Tech Answer Man 

used as a reference. Thus, a PNP tran- 
sistor can be used in a positive-voltage 
circuit, with its base being pulled lower 
(less positive) than its emitter; that's 
the same thing as negative, as far as 
the transistor is concerned, and it will 
turn on. 

Oops. 1 digressed a bit there, but for 
a reason. If you want to replace a bipo- 
lar transistor with one with a different 
part number (which is very often the 
case because there are so many kinds, 
and you cant get many of them), you 
must first narrow your choice to a part 
with the same polarity. You just can't 
replace an NPN with a PNP. By the 
way. the vast majority of transistors 
used today are NPN. PNFs, which are 
harder to make, are used only when 
realty necessary, such as in push-pull 
(Complementary} amplifiers and low- 
loss voltage regulators. 

Besides polarity, the most important 
specs for bipolar transistors are cutoff 
frequency, gain, power dissipation and 
voltage breakdown rating. Whew, 
that's a lot! This would seem to suggest 
that it would be impossible to cross a 
transistor to another part but. in prac- 
tice, it's done all the time. First, decide 
what the transistor is doing. If if s in an 
audio amp and is not part of a comple- 
mentary pair (in other words, it doesn't 
have an opposite- polarity transistor 
connected on top of or below it), 
chances are that any similar part of 
similar power-handling characteristics 
will do the job. ff it is part of a pair, you 
can still replace it with another kind of 
part as long as you replace its mate 
With the new part's mate. If you don't, 
you are likely to wind up with mis- 
matched parts, which will cause signal 
distortion, uneven current distribution, 
overheating and premature part failure 
of either your new part or the old mate. 

By the Numbers 

A few words about Japanese transis- 
tor part numbers: most parts start with 
either 2N, 2SA h 25B, 2SC or 2SD. 
2SAs and 2SBs are PNP. while 2SCs 
and 2SDs are NPN. Many techs have 
been mystified by parts with numbers 
like "C945." II pays to know that the 
manufacturers often leave the 2S des- 
ignator off the part to save space. So, a 
C945 is actually a 2SC945, which is a 
very common part. A number which 
starts with a "3" signifies an FET. 

FETs 

The FET (field Effect Transistor} is 
an entirely different kind of transistor. It 
uses the "field effect' f to regulate elec- 
tron flow through an internal channel. 
Its leads have different names: Gate, 
Source and Drain (instead of Base. 
Emitter, and Collector). 

The gate is analogous to a bipolar 
part's base, while the drain is like the 
co Hector, and the source is like the 
emitter. In some FETs, the drain and 
source may be interchanged while, in 
others, that is not possible. The dia- 
grams look different, too. 

In JFETs (junction FETs), the leads 



all exit straight, not diagonally, and the 
arrow is in the gate lead in the middle. 
The arrow points the "other way t " too, 
P-channel FETs have outward-point- 
ing arrows, while N -channel parts have 
them pointing inward. 

In MOSFETs (which have no actual 
junction between the gate and other 
leads), the gate is shown as a line sepa- 
rate from and parallel to the one which 
joins the other leads. No matter what 
kind of FET you me working with, the 
important thing to remember is that, as 
with bipolar parts, you cannot replace a 
P type with an N type or vice versa. 
Also, you can't substitute JFETs and 
MOSFETs for each other. 

Power FETs are similar to normal 
MOSFETs. only they are bigger and 
can handle much larger amounts of 
power, just like bipolar power transis- 
tors. They have the same basic charac- 
teristics as the smaller MOSFETs. 
They are just starting to find their way 
into our gear, but they are great parts 
and seldom fail unless badly over- 
stressed. Their part numbers are very 
different, and may be something like 
IRF511." If in doubt, look at the dia- 
gram. Needless to say, you can't re- 
place an FET with a bipolar, or a bipolar 
with an FET. Their characteristics are 
just too different. 

There are some other, obscure kinds 
of transistors. One thai comes to mind 
is the unijunction transistor. This thing 
has a diagram that too ks like a bipolar 
part, except thai the base comes in at 
an angle. Unij unctions are used pri- 
marily as pulse generators and oscilla- 
tors, but they are rare. I haven't seen 
one for a long time. 

Look it Up 

A great way to find a transistor sub- 
stitute that will work is to get a transis- 
tor substitution book which lists the 
"generic" American parts, such as 
those by GE or RCA. Then, look up the 
part you want to replace and see what 
the generic replacement is. Now, look 
up the part you have available. If it is 
replaced by the same generic, it will 
probably work. Even if it isn't, you can 
look at the specs on the generics and 
see if they are similar, Beware, though: 
l have found errors in these books. In a 
few cases, a large heat-si nked power 
transistor was crossed lo a liny, milli- 
watt-level part In such a case, com- 
mon sense must prevail; don't try the 
replacement if you don't like smoke! 

Walking on Two Legs 

Two-legged semiconductors are 
usually much easier to substitute. 
Nearly all the two-legged beasts you 
will encounter are rectifying diodes. 
The ones that go bad are usually found 
in power supplies In a normal, linear- 
regulated AC power supply, just about 
any diode of high enough voltage and 
current capacity will work fine. A com- 
mon number would be tN4002 8y the 
way, those four-legged bridge diodes 
can be replaced with standard diodes 
wired to emulate them, again as long 
as the voltage and current ratings are 
adequate. 

In switching supplies and regulators, 
high-speed diodes are used and the 
regular types |ust won't work. Your 
substitution book should cover most of 
these things. 



Zener diodes are used as voltage 
regulating elements. Their diagram 
looks like that of a diode, except that 
there are slanted lines exiting from the 
central one. Zeners operate by break- 
ing down in the reverse direction at a 
preset voltage. Their essential charac- 
teristics are the breakdown or "zener" 
voltage and the power dissipation ca- 
pabilities. Nearly ail the voltages can 
be had in generic parts, so it is usually 
not too hard to substitute zeners 

Smati- signal switching diodes typi- 
cally are of the 1 N914 or 1 N4148 vari- 
ety. They are pretty much all inter- 
changeable Some tow-noise switching 
diodes are used in transceivers, 
though, If you replace one with a stan- 
dard diode, it probably will still work, 
but the circuit's performance may be 
degraded due to noise generated in 
the cheaper part. Manufacturers only 
spend extra for the low-noise diodes 
when they have to, so it pays to re- 
place such a part with another low- 
noise one, 

Varactor diodes are not really diodes 
in the rectifying sense, but they have 
two leads, hence the name, They are 
really voltage-variable capacitors and 
should be replaced with exact part 
numbers or parts with the same capac- 
itance and sensitivity characteristics 

"Hot carrier" and other exotic 
diodes are sometimes used m mixers 
and the front ends of receivers, espe- 
cially in the VHF-and-up range. For 
Correct circuit performance, it is impor- 
tant to replace them with the same 
types. 

Home-brewing 

If you're building something from 
scratch, you may have great leeway in 
selecting which parts you'll use. In fact, 
if you have a well-stocked M junk box," 
you may find yourself designing your 
circuit to use what you have! This tech- 
nique can save lots of time and money, 
but your gadget may not be easily re- 
producible by others, because those 
special parts you've been squirreling 
away since 1957 may have gone out of 
style. Especially if you want your 
device published, it pays to use as 
many standard parts as possible, and 
to avoid unavailable ones like the 
plague, 

Playing the Standards 

So just what constitutes 'standard" 
parts? Well, 2N3904 and 2N3906 tran- 
sistors are about the most common 
kind available in the USA Ditto for 
1N914 and 1N4146 switching diodes 
and 1 N4000-series power rectifiers. 

If you're designing a digital circuit 
that doesn't have to operate faster than 
a few megahertz, consider using 4000- 
series CMOS parts. They use very little 
power, do not require regulated power 
supplies, and are very available . All in 
all. they are much easier to work with 
than are TTL and LSTTL chips. 

In op amps, the TL-Q72 and TL-Q74 
are common, as are the 1 458 and simi- 
lar numbers. In voltage regulators, the 
three-terminal National parts, such as 
the LM317 and the LM340, are virtual 
standards. 

Well I promised the addresses of 
various parts sources but, alas, I'm out 
of space again. I T II have them all for you 
next month. See you then. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 83 




Number 24 on your Feedback card 



ANDOM OUTPUT 

Da vid Cassidy N 1 GPH 



Freedom 

By the lime you read this, things will 
hopefully have calmed in the Soviet 
Union. As I write this, the right wing 
coup is less than 24 hours old, Gor- 
bachev is under house arrest and has 
yet to surface. Yeltsin is defying the 
order to vacate his offices, has called 
for a general strike, and a warrant has 
been issued for his arrest. Tanks sur- 
round the Kremlin, and the world is 
wailing to see the response from the 
several republics thai have recently 
tried to declare Iheir independence 
from the Soviet Union. 

As I watch the events in the Soviet 
Union unfold before me on my televi- 
sion, one word keeps coming to mind: 
Freedom. 

The people of the Soviet Union have, 
tor the first time in thetr long and tragic 
history, been served up a small taste 
from ihe plate of freedom, Wrtl they be 
happy with the memory of this brief 
period of openness, or will they stand 
up en masse and declare to the power 
brokers of their society that they refuse 
to go back to the old ways of repres- 
sion, fear and dictatorship? 

By the time you read this the events 
will probably have run their course and 
the outcome will be apparent. For now, 
watching this giant nation struggle with 
itself from the comfort of my living 
room, all I can think of is that one word: 
Freedom. 

Depending an how much of it you 
have, freedom means different things 
to different people, it can mean the 
freedom to speak your mmd and criti- 
cize the government, without the risk of 
bemg thrown in prison It can mean the 
right to publish or purchase a copy of 
Penthouse — or a copy of the Bibte (in 
the U.S., the same article of the consti- 
tution covers botfi) It can mean the 
right to worship God in your own way, 
whatever your concept of God hap- 
pens to be. It can mean the right to 
work for a fair wage, and that you will 
not bo judged by the color of your skin, 
the religion you subscribe to, or your 
gender. 

Freedom to a struggling farmer in a 
third world country may consist solefy 
of being able to provide tood and shel- 
ter for his family 

Here rn the United States, we enjoy 
an abundant supply of freedom. Our 
laws Of free speech and expression go 
so far as to allow us to take the symbol 
of our freedom, the flag, and publicly 
destroy it in protest. We can stand in 
front of the residence of our president 
and shout at him all day long. We can 
assemble by the hundreds of thou- 
sands in front of ihe Capitol building 
and express our outrage. Every few 
years, we have a quiet revolution — it's 
called election day Whether it's a sen- 
atorial, congressional or presidential 
election , our system has been set up so 
that no person can remain in power 
without the consent of those who be- 
stow that power— the people. 

What has all this got to do with 
amateur radio? Plenty! What do you 
think it is that gives you (he right to tune 
up on 40 meters and call CO? What 
gives you the right to comment on 
a proposed rule change by the FCC? 
What gives you the right to tell your 
congressman that unless he supports 
a certain bill, hell be looking for a 



new job after the next election? 

The freedom we exercise every time 
we fire up the of rig is the same free- 
dom that allows some to hang out on 75 
meters every night and tell dirty jokes 
with their friends. The freedom that al- 
lows me to trade a recipe for alfredo 
sauce over packet is the same freedom 
that allows those screwballs on 14,313 
to tie up that end of the 20 meter band 
with their endless banality, bigotry and 
bull; Every lime we hit that push-to-talk 
switch, we are taking advantage of 
freedom. 

As we all learned in high school so- 
cial studies class, freedom cames with 
it responsibility. Have you ever really 
pondered what that means to us as 
amateur radio operators? Every time 
we tf ansmil, we are giving evidence to 
how well we are handling the responsi- 
bility of some very powerful freedom. 
Are we exercising that freedom re- 
sponsibly, thereby guaranteeing it for 
the next generation, or are we taking 
advantage of that freedom to serve our 
own ego? 

I'm not advocating that all communi- 
cation on the amateur bands needs to 
be dull. I love to get into intelligent dis- 
cussions of politics and religion, as 
long as they don't decay into name 
calling and hurt feelings. I've listened 
m on — and participated in — some pret- 
ty lively QSOs about such topics as the 
Gulf War, no-code T President Bush's 
domestic poticies (or lack thereof), the 
recession, the homeless. Islamic fun- 
damentalism, . ,the list is endless. 
Each of these conversations was a 
heated debate, conducted by people 
with strongly held ideas and opinions, 
yet they ail respected the responsibility 
that the freedom of speech demands. 
They had respect for the fact that they 
were choosing to exercise their free- 
dom In a public place. 

Whenever you transmit on an HF 
band, there is the likely possibility that 
you are being monitored by people in 
several countries. Each of these coun- 
tries is different, with a different con- 
cept of freedom, yet most of these 
countries have a say in whether or not 
you and L as radio amateurs, will be 
allowed to continue to exercise this 
freedom via radio waves. Are we show- 
mg + by our actions, that the free ex- 
change of ideas, educational opportu- 
mties, and international goodwill 
offered by amateur radio is worth more 
to a developing nation than a short- 
wave broadcast allocation? 

We do not have a right lo the fre- 
quencies we occupy. Amateur radio is 
a privilege, not a right. It is a privilege 
that we. as a nation, have bestowed 
upon ourselves. A nation of 250 million 
has decided to let a group of less than 
500 ,000 occupy some very valuable 
frequency spectrum. If the nation ever 
decides that our frequencies could be 
better utilized by some other service, 
we will lose those frequencies faster 
than you can say "majority rules/' 

Right now. radio amateurs have an 
enormous amount of freedom. 
Whether or not we can maintain it is 
totally up to us and how we exercise 
that freedom. What's going on in the 
Soviet Union this hot August night 
serves to remind us just how fragile 
that freedom is. 




Number 25 on your Feedback card 



ROPA GA TION 



Jim Gray W1XU 
210 Chateau Circle 
PaysonAZ$554t 

October is expected to be a very 
good month for propagation on 
short-path, long -path, and interme- 
diate-path distances to DX loca- 
tions. Although the solar flux contin- 
ues to slowly decline, with 
occasional spurts to higher levels, 
the inexorable reduction in sun spots 
is going to take its toll. 

Early darkness will tend to cause 
the bands higher than 14 
MHz to close shortly before 
or after dark, while the bands 
below 14 MHz will begin to 
come alive for DX. Because 
of good opportunities for 
grayline OX {along the path 
of darkness), you can often 
make some excellent DX cn- 
tacts shortly before or after 
dark and dawn, local time. 
Morning and afternoon DX 
will be great* however, from 
14-30 MHz 

The best days for propaga- 
tion will be more numerous 
than usual, with the really 
poor days concentrated 
around the 17th through the 
22nd of the month. The ap- 
pended Chart will show you 
Good (G), Fair (f), and Poor 
(P) days, and those marked 
with two letters showing 
trends toward better or poor- 
er conditions. 

Those of you who enjoy DX 
on top band (160 meters), 
80-75 meters, and 40-30 
meters, will really enjoy Octo- 
ber, During that season, the 
QRN levels decrease in the 
Northern Hemispehre due to 
fewer storms There are few- 
er storms because of lower 
sun angles and less atmo- 
spheric heating and vertical 
mixing. Storm fronts may 
tend to be slower moving, but 
the tendency for prolonged 



Jim Gray W1XU 



high pressure areas to remain over 
targe segments of the U.S. wilt pre- 
vail, VHRUHFers should be sure to 
look for tropo spheric ducting along 
weather fronts. 

Keep a sharp lookout for some 
pretty harsh geophysical effects on 
the days indicated as poor. My 
guess is that the 18th, 19th, and 20th 
will be most critical this month. Bat- 
ten down the hatches on those days, 
and (ook for us again in November. 
See you then deWiXU 



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84 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1991 



OCTOBER 1991 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRl SAT 






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Software Enhancement Kit 



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QSO rimer * OX CCd-hue*' beam-head 
• Sdepad vi «ft> date reminder. 

These features arc in all I jor perns; 

* Pnni> miiline labels A batch QSL report v * Scmtlmp 
lug dispL > -iidshcet type data entry • Hot keys. 

■ Pnog aulo crihie*. ■ Search' modify file*. • Tracking cdl 

wf Ion. » Auio tall search. * Per^maJ D-hase. * Aulo 

country entry, »QSL [ratkinp. • On-.KL"recji help 

The follow Utfi are in all "X" pgms: 
■ Kcnwond Tii/R\ tonttol & display * 

The Follow inji are in all "II" pums. 

raddle key uuxii for mamul t levt runK" keying 

A fulls irtiecratoi OK autokeyct wf *f prug TX huffers 

• Macro keys. *5-40 wpm * Aunt 5S 

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CIRCLE 282 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



AUTOLOG PLUS $25.00 

AUTOLOG PLUS-X . . , . • $35,00 

AUTOLOG PLUS II $45,00 

AUTOLOG PLUS II-X . ( . $55,00 

AUTOKEY PLUS $30,00 

AUTOKEY PLUS-X $45.00 

QSO MANAGER (PLUS-X) . $25,00 

For PC XT AT and Compatible. 

5.25" & 35" floppies- Add SJ.OQ if mnside L S 

and Canada. A/ orders. add 5.5% stale tan. 

CALL SIGN REQUIRED W/ ORDER. 

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CIRCLE 279 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




ACTUAL ETCHED PRINTED 
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CIRCLE 64 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MULTIPLE REPEATER -LINK -REMOTE BASE 

CONTROLLER 

Finally a controller mat has solved control and audio interconnect problems between 
multiple radios. Your radio system can grow to multiple sites and stretch for hundreds 
or miles - and yet any radio can be fully controlled from any designated Input. 




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multiple radios eon necfed lo^ihef at a site. The RBC- 7 <"> utilizes a true 7 i 7 audio mafn\ 
switch which allows several. ctravcrvatiorLs berweefl ports at the same time. In the illustration 
atmvt the 733 mndel is supposing s Repeater. 3 Duplexed Link.* to difTeiem sites, and J 
He nunc Basts Lsinj simple commands, a user could lie the Repc&ier and a Remote Base 10 
one Uhokt while the in her Links are communicaijng ihniugh your siic, NciJdinj separate 
corvcrsatjons. Or. coniieci jIE of the ports together - like u big party line 1! 

Severs] models arc available and arc software ttinTiguruhLc to support up to 3 Repeaters, 5 
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Interim led A«l«patch 

Expand at anv time 

Pragrarnmable Scheduler 

+ 10vto + |4> Suppls 

SI an da rd 5.25' Rack Mount 

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QSO Comp-T roller 

PC Comrol for Kenwood Rigs 






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CIRCLE 145 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today ■ October, 1991 85 






REFERENCE 



WA YNE'S PIX 



22C3 1 How to Work the Competition Into the Ground A Have 
Fun Doing H by John T. Motif y Amcrit a > infi consuJdant reveals his 
proven tochniuucs for dramatically increasing how mudi work you 
do tnLdt the time '19.95 



2DNQW Electromagnetic Han ar Cjrrtf » Sauta A SnM 
exammo the mounting evidence of harmf id biological effect t fi 
eleorumagnciic field*. Full or utterly fix-moling material 
areav 129.95 



1 r- 



SHORTWA VE 



20N101 Everyday Electronics Data Book by Mike Totdey BA> Info- 

mation is presented in the form of a basic electronic recipe book with 
numerous example* showing how iheorv can he put into practice using a 
range of commonly available 'industry standard componenti and tlcvh.es. 
256 pp 134 line drawings, S MUX) 

20NI02 Pracuoal Digital Electronics Handbook by MO* Teoirj 

1 1 il liii aits rfifiii ■ ilfjiii |i m iji 1 1 1 , fl tn? mil TT1 | 11 1 n 11 nl 1 iJ»fc 1 

or reference data Imoducei digital encuots, lope gates, testable* and 
timers, rmcmprtvessois, anemorv and input nutpui devices, before look- 
ing u the RS-232C interface and the fEE£-MH and lEEE-lOOD rmtropeo- 
ceiwars hui^s 208 np. , 100 line drawings. $ 14.5ft 

.I11NLO3 Electronic Power Supply Handbook by Ian R. Sinclair 
Lovers many types of supplies— batteries, simple AC supplier switch 
mode supplies and inverter All types of supplies used for electronics 
purposes are covered in detad. Martin^ with edit ijri bntterks and extend- 
ing by way of rectified supplies and linear stahtJucr* 10 modem s witch - 
mode sy^cmi.lCsifndb- mode 
etv I44pp ,901inedra>Lnp 1IG.25 

20N 1 04 Electronic Test Equ ipment Handbook *? 5**t* M away is a 
guide {ockcinnuc traeGAupmcat for the engineer, technician, undent and 
home enthusiast, Provide* ■ practical guide lo widely used electronics 
instruments and the techniques of measuring a ^ ide range of parameters in 
electronic systems. 2 16 pp., 123 line drawing*. SI 8.00 

2DN 1 05 Digital Logic Gates and Flip-flops by Ian R. Sinclair, what 
they do and how io use the m Seeks to establish ji fl rm fwndat inn in digital 
electronics by treating the topic* of gates and nip-Mops thoroughh and 
from the hegunung. For the user who wants tn design and irouMeshool 
digital circuitry widi conMderaWy more unoeraaadaaj of principles than 
fe coaaand ■ nl ate eajasj M tana tmw inan * fn* rules of rjannb 
about digiud arcu<s. 3>* pp . I6nlrneurawin*> 118 90 

02O0 Tht Commodore Ham's Companion by Jim Gnats* K9E! 
160 pages of useful information on selecting a Commodore computer for 
the ham shack , where to find specialized programs . the Commodiirc- pack- 
et connection, and more! $9.50 

I0M44 World Atlas Av Radfo Amateur Calibmk !nc, 20 pp. of lull color, 

8* r x I OH ". cnnlains North Polar pTDJeclinn of I he world, niaph of all 
sewn continent, Wes Indie^Canooean area, and Pacific Ocean If .00 

0OD2I The World Ham Ne1 Dkactofy by Mike WaLnrdd f kw * * 
ood eddjoa now over 600 net liamgs. Tina book introduces (be specval 
ttifrest ham radio network* and shnwi you when and where you cut tune 
£hcmia.f*_5t 

IQTO9t 1991 tnternatwoal Call boo* The new 1991 ! ittematHmal Cafl- 
book lists 500.000 licensed radio amaieun in the countries ouMiide North 
America it covers Souiti America r Fairope, Africa. Asia, and The Pacific; area 
(exclusive oilUivjit and the U.S possesawnst. S2M,Q5 



I0D09I 1991 North American Callbook The 1991 Nonh American 
Callrxxik lists the calls, names, and address information for over 500.000 
licensed radio amateur*; in all tuumncs of Nonh Amerha , from Panama to 
Canada itwluding Greenland* Berrnuda. and (he Caribbean iriand* pina 
HawBti and US Dosaeaawrts. S29.95 

05tf24 Radio Handbook, 23rd Ed. by WUlmm t. Ott WiSAl £40 pages 
of everything you waaaed lo kaow ahout radao aaatruiiwc arjoBt- Indeoth 
study of AC/DC tuadvncaatv SSB. JBaaanaa, amediTien. power sur> 
pliet. md more. $29.50 Bard coier onJs 

12E76 Basic Eleclronlos Prepaid by the Bureau of Navat Personnel 
Thoroughly revised In 1972. Coven the important aspects of applied 

ill'. Ii< M^li3L'ki1rMi M i:-. 1 ii|inh'.iliii'Ml',in.' 1 W? [>\i %WM> 

I2E4I Second Level Basic Electronics Fnpartd by the Bureau of 
Suva} Personnel Sequel to Basic Elecitxmici, thorough treatment of die 
more advanced leveb of applied electronics, include* microwave reeeiv 
mg and tnosmaiiftc Hundreds of eicelleii diogranas. 323 pp. ¥734 

0IW5 The HHistrattd Dictionary of Eleciroflica; 5lh Ed. W «a=/w 

F Turner and Stan Gtinluco Feoiuruig more than 27.000 entriet. an 
exhaustive list of abbreviations and appendices pactad wih schematic 
symbols and conversion tobies, this u by far the mon comp rehensive 
dictionary of pracfical cIcctromCA and computer lerms available. 720 pages 
$26,95 

04MM GGTE More? Tulor From hcginrwr to Eatra 6m tn eoiy self- 
paced letsoni Code speeds from 1 looter 1 00 words per minute. Standard 
or Famtworth mode. Adjustable tone frequency. Create your own drills. 
practice or actual runs Eunts conform to FCC requuements, 5 K Happy 
for IBM PC, XT. AT. PS^2 or cornpatibles $19 JO 

. u M" Advanced Edition S29 .95 

20NO9I laoat^men^feded Radio Diagrams and Servicing 
1 n format ion, 1 && 1 933 , Vol ume One eompMby M. .V. 
An invaluable rtierence for anyone involved tn Vintage Radio i 
Hundred! of schematics, writing diagrams and pan.s luia, all from ihe 
original sources, $11 .95 

^'1N096 How To Read Schematics (4th edition) by Donald I 
Herringum Wnrten for the begirvner in electronics, but it also containi 
mformation valuable to the nobby 1st and engineering technician. This book 
h your bey id unlocking the ntysicnei of v^aiumg., beennmg wnb a 
general dscnssaoti of efoctroinc diagrams f 14.95 

JONtmtodtoOemlw-sWortdAta W§CF 

This is a compact f 3iT|. detailed , and ciirrrprehcnsive wnrld atlas designed 
as a constant desk; lop cemparuoo for radnoperaion^iDdasirepUcemcni 
for the traditional bulky and outdated atlases, Also Included are42pass»af 
viial Mali sties afniui eavh country Pdpulur wittiDXerswortdiMde. SI7.95 



U.1S1 1 Shortwave Receivers Past and Present edit- 
ed by Fred J. Overman Conciie guide to 200 i shortwave 
receivers rnaraitactured m the last ?Q years Giscv key 
luiuuwUon oa each model rnclodaag coverage, display, 
circud type pedbmEiiice. flew s-aJne. used >alue. etc 
PfK4m on rrwtt models The Blue &x4 of «hortwase radio 
value i«»7 t 104 pages, BW x II 18.95 

07R25 The RTTY Listener by Fred Oaterman New and 

expanded utMi in. This spcciali/ddntKjkconifnk^ issues I 
through 25 of ihe RTTY b.iu-i\rr Newsletter. U ctmtains 
up-lo-dale. hard -tn find informalkin on wkjiii, rd KTTV 
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pages. $19*95 

0X>wShOrtssrav*Clar>o«stineCorTn^ 
n L. btittr Cmenall cUodevine brnadcaMing. counuy 
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tion spy. insurgents, freedom fighters, rebel, marctitst 
radio, secrti radio. Current puhheancm. 84 pages 18.50 

03M22I IIS Military Communications (Part 1) Deals 

with US Mililury common 1c.1i ion channels on ^ujilwuvc 
Cover*. Ircqucucws, hackground on pQirtt to puinl Irc- 
uuenckes for ihv Philippines. Japan and Korea, Indian and 
Pacific Oceans . and mare 3 1)2 pages. 112.95 

AIM::: US Uttttary Communications (Pmr\ 2) Cov- 
en US Coastguard. NASA. CAP F\A. Dept nf Energy, 
Federal E mergency Management Aseney , Disaster Com- 
mtnicatims. FCC. Dept. of Justice From l4KCtoW73 
KC 79 pages Si 2.95 

ISM22.1 US M Hilary Communications (Part 3) TMi 
pan completes the vast ntcrali frequenc| \i\i of US. Mili- 
ary jserric^ from B993 KC to 27,<*44 KC 7« pages, 
$12,93 

0QS42 The Soannef Listener s Handbook by FJ- 
vard Soomrt MBFF Get die most ou of your scanner 
radio Covers getting started* scanners and receivers, an- 
tennas, coaxial cable . accessories, franfiarr controlled 
rnonoonng more 114.95 

ANTENNAS = 



03S208 Radwtefetype Press Broadcasts In If ichuef 
SrAaarr Covers scnedules of Press Services by time, frc- 
ouency. ood country broadcasiing in Fwglidh. French. 
German, Sprnna, and Porrogoese Detoikd Press Agency 
Piielrajts 120 pp 112.95 

I iTHJs Tune in on Telephone Calks by Tom Kntittt 
KJAES Formatted ss *t treouency list with detailed de- 

uriptiori of eatih service and lis location in RF spectrum. 
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ed and details for ardent cnthusiasiv 112.95 

03K2U5 GuWt lo R*dk>teleiype f RTTY) Stations by 
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> Air Scan Guide to Aeronautical Communt* 
cations (5th Edition) by Tom Kntiiel K2AES Most 
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07 A66 Aeronautical Cornmunicauons 
Robert £. Evam K *Ji*y4ivt , schnkrry 
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07R20 A Radio Journal 1912-1940 by ton Ren- 
aaktr W9CRC A fa^tnating ton through time Easy to 
read and in formal iv c. educational kind entertaining A trip 
down memory lane CO uic early days of radio. 17.95 

I IRFJ3 The ' ' Top Secret 1 ' Reg kalry of US Govern- 
ment Radio Frequencies (7th Ed,) by Tom Unriiel 
K1AES This scanner directory has become the standard 
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IIF52 Ferrell's Confidential Frequency Ust co»- 
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nunabers. Art Force Chie/Two. more J76 pp 119 JO 

11SR97 National Directory of Survival Radio Fre- 
quencies by Tom Kneitel KIAES Handy and concise 
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1 1 SM n Scanner Hod Hie ation Handbook r Vol . 1 by 

Bill Creek Provides 5lnitL.htfur*ard step bv^ <4ep mstruc- 
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MNOB WorttJ Broadoftst Slalion Address Book 
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to uscrease sour QSl. percentage tS,95 



ot ihart- 



I lEECft Guide to Embassy Estpionagi Commune 
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I5D9I 1991 Shortwave Directory (7th ed.) by fob 
Grove F.ticmwveJy revised, the new 1991 Srwrtwave Di- 
rectory is the consummate DXers bible tot fhe first 30 
MHz of radaa spectrum, including upHodate and accura a c 
VLF information as wdl 270 orfonnjiwopatked and 
dlusi rued pages in coavenieni 8 4 x 1 1 fhrsnaf proressaan- 
aily bound Kl.95 



20NO93 Vintage Radio 1887-1MS r>y Morwan £ 
McMahttH Recaptures the ejKitemenl ol the early days, 

The authoritative reference book for historians and collet ■ 
tors SOS 

20N094 A Rick of the Switch, 1930-1950 byMorpm 
EL McUahm Here's your chance to recapture the thrill of 
otd time rodw and teles tsioa . Bro> se fhfough a thousand 
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vcwowniitkorceflsr $8,95 



VIS Study Card* Advance the easy way with 
VIS Study Cards. Compact. Up-to-date Flash 
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TECH VISG7. 10.95 

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ADVANCED VOW 15.95 

EXTRA VISQ5 14.95 

Urtze Coda Pre ) gramsv— (AviitablB cm 5H* 
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IBM Putf Consnodne Portf Pin 
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WA95 • la«v-up Antenrrps for Radio Listeners 
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jfttwuiJIrirlpsnu *l*.50 

I0A345 * Beam Antenna HovsJbook by VHftam On 
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system* A nuta" forierious DXers. Jit. 95 

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OUTi • Practical Antanm Handbooit hj JaaafiJ 
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ntt Carr. a 20 -year veteran of technical writ- 
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$21 50 



UHF/VHFf PACKET 



10A34? All About VHF Amateur Radio by Wilttam 
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Fully illustrated. 1 12 pages. 18,50 



09V 1 1 The Basic Guide lo VHF/UHF Ham Radio 
by Edward if SoS This bonk provides a first rate 
introduction to life on die 2.6 and ! 25 meter bonds as 
«efl as 23, 33. andTOon «.5u 



01 P22 The Packet Radio Handbook by h 
L Mayo H.RJT" on ucelkmt piece of wort Well 
worth reading rnr both the experienced and the new 
packctecr. . .the definitive guide to amateur packet op- 
eration ." -Qwyn Reedy Wl BEL Only 114.50 



ARRL BOOKS 



ARIWI AflflL 1991 Handbook (60th ed.) 39 
chapters, featuring 2,100 tables , figures and charts. 
The most comprehensive, well organized and afford- 
able source of amateur radio reference material, 1232 
page*. $25,00 

ARIQE6 ARRL Operating Manual Packed with in- 
formation on how 10 make the best use of your station, 
i Deluding; interfacing home computers* OSCAR, 
VHF-UHF, contesting. $15-00 

ARDI94 Antenna Compendium Vol. 1 Materials 
on verticals, quads, loops* yagis, reduced itze anten- 
nas, hailing Smith Charts , antenna polarization, and 
other interesting subjects. II 0,00 

AR2545 Antenna Compendium Vol. 2 42 papers 
covering verticals, yagis, quads, multiband and broad- 
band systems, antenna selection, and much more. 
S12.O0 

AR2626 Com pan io n Soft wa re lor Antenna Com- 
pendium Vol, 2 5 1 tA" MS-DOS Jloppv , $10.00 

ARM &8 WIFB's Antenna Notebook Ay Doug 
DeMaw "WIFE Get the best performance out of unob- 
trusive wire antennas and verticals. Build tuners and 
SWR bridges tS.QO 

AR034B ORP Notebook by Doug DeMaw WIFB 

Presents construction projects for the QRP operator, 
from a simple I watt crystal controlled transmitter to 
more complex transceiver designs. $6.00 

AR4I49 WlFB's Design Notebook by Doug 
Ik-Maw WlFB Tins, plain language book is filled with 
simple practical projects that can be built using readily - 
available components and common hand tools. $10.00 



NEW STUFF 



NewlYofode 







2UM IB Technician 
Class License 
Manual: New No- 
Code by Gordon 
West This book will 
cover everything you 
need to become a 
Technician Class 
Ham. Every enact 
question and answer 
on [he examinations is 
found in this one book 
covering clement 2 
and element 3 A ques- 
tion pools, Gordon 
West tells you the 
right answer and then 
explains in detail why the answer is correct. Fully illus- 
trated tc*t, frequency chart showing privileges, list of 
examiners and an FCC Form 6 10 application. $9.95 

07R26 World Wide Aeronautical Communica- 
tions by Robert E. Brans This 42 page book was 
designed to update and augment the frequency lists 
published in the Aeronautical Communications Hand- 
book HF Edition- Contents include Aircraft/ Air Traf- 
fic Control, Airtralt/Compafiy Operations ; Aviation 
Weather Broadcasts. Aeronautical Flight Tests, 
Worldwide Military Ait Forces. Aero Search & Res- 
cue, Aero Law Enforcement, NASA Flight Support, 
Aero Terms & Abbreviations and Aero Tactical Identi- 
fiers. $6,95 

1 1TB9 Scanner Modification Handbook Vol. 2 by 
Rtfi Creek Here it is— a companion to Vol , I . In fact. 
Vol. 2 has a section that provides improved approaches 
and updated techniques for the mods in Vol. I . There s 
18 new T exciting modifications for popular scanners 
and is fully illustrated with photos and schematics, 
highly delailed step-by-step instructions bo that the av- 
erage hobbyisl can do these performance enhancing 
modifications. This is an ail new book that has all new 
mods. $17.95 

03R0L World Press Services Frequencies 
(RTTY) New 5th edition. A comprehensive manual 



AR2200 Antenna Impedance Matching by Wil- 
fred r\ r Coron Most comprehensive book written on 
using Smith Charts in solving impedance matching 
problems. $15,00 

ARO402 Solid State Design Chock Full of good, 
basic information, circuit designs and applications; de- 
scriptions of receivers, transmitters, power supplies, 
and test equipment, $12.00 

AR3193 Weather Satellite Handbook (4th ed.) 
by Dr. Ralph Taggoit WB8DQT Hoi off the press! 
Expanded and revised to reflect today's weather-fax 
satellite technology. $20,00 

AR3290 Companion Software for Weather 
Satellite Handbook 51/4" MS DOS Floppy, $10,00 

AR329I NOW You're Talking!: Discover the 
World of Ham Radio Successor to the immense^ 
popular Tune in the World with Hum Radio, Covers 
everything you need to know to earn your first Amateur 
Radio license, More than a study guide, this book will 
help you select equipment for your ham radio station 
and explain how 10 Set it up — everything you'll need to 
know to get on the air! An ARRL Publication. $19.00 

AR3292 Your Introduction to Morse Coder Prac- 
tice Cassettes Companion code course to ,\W 
You "re Talking!, this kit includes two 90 minute cas- 
sette tapes. Prepares you for the 5 WPM Morse code 
exam to earn your Novice license or add high-frequtn ■ 
cy worldwide communications privileges to vour code- 
free Technician license. $10.00 

ARI033 The DXCC Companion by Jim Kearman 
KRIS spells out in simple, straightforward terms what 
you need to be a successful DXer. $6,00 

AR 1 250 Log Book-Spiral (3.50 



covering radiotekiypc news monitoring— contains all 
inibrmaiion— antenna, receiving, terminal units, plus 
three extensive frequency lists. Covers €5 World Press 
Services breadcasting in English- "The Original Press 
Book." fi4 pp. ,$8.95 

2ON104 Ham Stuff-The Who— What-Where 
Of Amateur HadiO by Wait Garrett This is the indis- 
pensable new guide to everything in Ham Radio. If you 

want lo know who's on first and what's what, this 
valuable guide belongs in your shack. You'll refer to it 
again and again to find just the right equipment, where 
to shop, and who to call. Everything from radios toQSL 
cards io hat pins, complete with product descriptions. 
vendor profiles, prices, and more. $19.95 

AR2065 ABHL Antenna Book The new I6ih edition 
represents the best and most highly regarded informa- 
tion on antenna fundamenials, transmission lines, de- 
sign, and const ruction of wire antennas, Over 700 
pages , over 900 figu res . A n ARK L Publication . $20.00 

AR3293 Morse Code: The Essential Language 
hyL Peter Catron Jr. WSDKVhas been expanded and 
revised in its 2nd edition. Peter Canon details its fasci- 
nating history as well as sharing practical learning in- 
formation. Readers will learn how to handle distress 
catls heard not only OH the hambands but on maritime 
and aircraft frequencies. Copyright [591. softcovcr. 
An ARRL Publication , $6,00 



20M105 73 Clock 
Tills traditional 24 
hour clock will 
look greal on the 
wall of your shack. 
"The bright 7J logo 
welcomes visitors 
to your operating 
position, while 
showing your ob- 
vious good taste in 
ham radio maga- 
zines. $39.95 




BOOKS FOR BEGINNERS 



OIB65 The Beginner's Handbook of Amateur 
Radio— 2nd Editor] by Clay Ijtstcr Combines theory 

andpracitce in an casy-to-understand format, and pro- 
vides information for choosing and installing radio re- 
ceivers and transmitters r antennas, transmission lines, 
andte&te^uipment.400page&,2t?l illustrations. 118.50 

2QN0Q2 The Wonderful World of Ham Radio by 
Richard Skoinik, KB4LCS This book addresses the 
plea that something simple, clear, and fun be written to 
introduce young people to amateur radio. Pick-up one 
for the new ham in your life. $7.95 

2GN099 Digital Electronics Projects for Begin- 
ners by Owen Bishop contains 12 digital electronics 
projects suitable for the beginner to build with the mini- 
mum of equipment . 128 pp., 56 line drawings. $12,50 

20N Lfjrj Electronics Buitd and Learn (2nd edi- 
tion) hy RA Pinfold combines theory and practice so 
that you can L learn hy doing.' Full construction details 



of a circuit demonstrator unit that is used in subsequent 
chapters to introduce common electronic components. 
Describes how these components are built up into use- 
ful circuits, oscillators, multivibrators, bistables, and 
logic circuits. 128 pp., I Hi photos, 72 line drawings. 
£12.50 

AR207 \ Novice Antenna Notebook A beginners 
guide to easy and effective antennas and laners you can 
build $8,00 An ARRL Publication 

AR287L WlFB's Help for New Hams by Doug 
DeMaw WIFE Complete for the newcomer. Put to- 
gether a station and get on the air. $10.00 An ARRL 
Publication, 

AR22S6 First Steps In Radio by Doug DeMaw 
WIFR Series of QST articles. See components assem* 
bled into practical circuits and how the circuits make up 
your radio gear, $5M An ARRL Publication. 



ARA341 Interference Handbook Written from an 
RFl sleuth's perspective H is experience in solving in- 
terference problems. $12.00 

AR2I97 Data Book Valuable aid to the RF design 
engineer, technician, radio amateur, and experimenter. 
Commonly used tables, charts, and those hard-io-rc- 
member formulas. $12,00 

AR2960 Transmission Line Transformers (2nd 
ed-) by Dr. Jerry Sevick W2FM1 Practical designs and 
specific information on construction techniques and! 

sources of material. More designs for antenna tuners, 
hybrids, and for the VHF and UHF bands. 272 pp. 
$20.00 

ARRL License Manuals All the theory you need to 
pass your test. Complete FCC question pools with an- 
swers. 

AR2375 Tec hnician Class $6,00 

AR23S3 General Class $6.00 

AR0 1 66 Advanced Class $6.00 

AR2391 Extra Class S8.00 

AR0410 Vagi Antenna Design Originally published 
as a series in Nam Radio „ pol ished and e Apanded by Dr. 
Lawson. 115.00 

ARCH 37 ARRL Repeater Directory 1991-1992 

Almost 18,000 listings with over 2200 digipealers. 
Band plans, CTCSS (PL™) Tone Chart, compilation of 
frequency coordinators, ARRL Special Service Clubs. 
and 500 beacon listings from 14MHz to 24GHz. %M 

AR2PI Hints and Kinks Find the answer io that 
tricky problem. Ideas for setling up your gear for 

comfortable, efficient operation. $8.00 

CODE TAPES = 

One answer tit the no-COde brou-ha-ha is tit make the code so simple to tram thai it s a non-problem. Herewith the world's 
eaxtest code mum—tern of thousands of hams hav? gotten their Ucen.ie.i this amazing new shortcut *vay. If'xJadure-pfQOf, 
\4mt people art able to whip through fhe Novice test after Spending less than three hours each on Genesij; and The Stickler. 

People who ba vt given up on other rWf courses find this one daei- the job tn u jiffy. Going after your General ? It '$ about time. 
Use the Back Breaker and you 'If be there before you know it. A week should do it. Warning, 20Wpufl code almost invariably 
dffpearf to cause irreparable, irreversible, permanent bfllifi dtimctge Uncle Wayne accepts nu respvnsibibty -ubiilever fhr 
tin\ihinfi that happens to those ndki are foolish enough iousfihe Courageous 2(Mpm tape. 



AR3169 QRP Classics Collection of articles from 
last 15 years of ARRL publications on building reeeiv 
ess, transmitters, transceiver, accessories, 288 pp 
$12.00 

AR3135 The Satellite Experimenter's Hand- 
book, (2nd Ed.) by Martin Duwid&fJ K2UBC 
Expanded and revised, this 2nd edition of "The Satel- 
lite Experimenter's Handbook" is your guide to using 

and designing safeties, focusing on those built by 

and for i he i nternationai radio amateur community, 
$20.00 

AR0477 Low Band Dxing How to meet the chal- 
lenges of the different forms of 160, 90, and 40 meter 
propagation with effective antennas, equipment, and 

operating slrategtes $10-00 

AR20J0 Your Gateway to Packet Radio (2nd ed.) 

Tells everything you need to know ahotii this popular 
new mode; how to get started, equipment you nw:d, and 
more S 12,00 

AR2456 FCC Rule Book (8th ed.) A must for every 
active radio amateur. $9.00 

AR2103 Satellite Anthology The latest informal ion 
on OSCARs 9 through 1 3 as well as the RS satellites. 
Information on (he use of digital modes, tracking anten- 
nas, RUDAK. microcomputer, and more! $5,00 

AR289B Space Almanac hy Attfhvtty R. Curtis 
KJKXK Captures the breathtaking rcccnl news from 
space. Includes information on Amateur Radio satel- 
lites- Find almost everything about man's trip to the 
stars, 960 pp. $20.00 

AR2033 Complete DX'er (2nd ed.) by Bob Locker 
W9KNi Learn how to bunt DX and obtain hard-to-get 
Q5L cards. $12,00 



73T05 ■■Genesis" $5,M 

5 wpm— This is the beginning tape, taking you through 
the 26 letters, 10 numbers, and necessary punctuation, 
complete with practice every step of the way. The 
case of learning gives confidence even to the faint of 
heart. 



73T13 'Back Breaker 1 ' %SM 

13+ wpm — Code groups again, at a brisk 13+ wpmso 
you "II be really at case when you sit down in front of a 
steely-eyed volunrcer examiner who starts sending you 
plain language code at only 13 per. You 11 need this 
cstra margin |o overcome the sheer panic universal in 
most test situations. You've come ihis far, so dtinT gel 
code shy now I 



73T06 "The Stickler" $S.¥S 

4+ wpm— This is the practice tape for those who sur- 
vived the 5 wpm tape, and it's also the tape for the 
Novtee and Technician licenses, It is comprised of one 
solid hour of code. Characters are sen) at 1 3 wpm and 
spaced at 5 wpm. Code groups arc entirely random 
characters sent in groups of five— definitely not ineino- 
ri2able! 

73T20 "Courageous 17 $5.95 

20+ wpm— Congratulation s * Okay, the challenge of 

code is what's gotten you this far, so don't quu now. Go 
for the extra class license. We send the code faster than 
20 per. 1 1 's like wearing lead we ights on your feel when 
you run: You'll wonder why the examiner is sending so 
slowly! 



Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form 

' You may order by mail, telephone, or fax. All payments are to be 
I in US funds. Allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



I 
I 
I 
■ 



ltem# 



Title 



Qty. 



Price 



SHIPPING 

TOTAL [ 



I 
I 

SHIPPING 
| U.S. add S3.00 mall, $4,00 UPS. 

Canada add $4.00 mail. 
| U, P. S Jo Canada and all foreign orders FOB Peterborough, NH. 



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1 Telephone: (603) 924-4 1 96 (800) 234-8458 FAX: (603) 924-861 3 

■ Maik 73 Magazine, Attn. Uncle Wayne, PO Box 3080, Peterborough, NH 03458 



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9500 Cedar Lake Ave., Suite 100 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731 14 

Local & Info (405) 478 2866 FAX (405) 478-4202 



C.O.D. 



Hours of Operation 
M-F10 6 
Sat 10-3 



J 



FT-6200 

Trunk-Mountable 
High Power Dual Band 
VHF/UHF FM Transceiver 

If you want more than just another 
pretty face, choose the FT-5200 or 
FT-6200 dual band mobile transceivers. 
For extra security, take the removable 

* 

front panel with you whenever you 
leave your vehicle. The transceivers 
can't be operated without them. With 
the optional cable kit the front panel 
can be mounted anywhere in your car 
and the transceiver body stowed under 
a seat or i n the tr u n k . For extremely 
powerful communications capabilities 



with maximum user convenience and 
equipment security, face the facts and 
pick \aesu. Standard features include: 

Features and Options: 

• 32 Memories: 16 tunable memory 
channels for each band. 

• Channel Steps: 5, 10. 12.5, 15.20, 
25 kHz. 

• Removable Ffr>nt Panels for Quick 
and Easy Installation 

• CTCSS Encode Built-in: 38 sub- 
tones selectable from the front panel 

• Full Duplex Crass Band Operation: 

Independent squelch and mixing bal- 
ance, for simultaneous listening or 

transmitting. 

• Independent TX/RX Frequencies: 
Odd splits ok on any memory 
channels. 




Programmable Subband Limits: For 

band scanning. 

Selectable Scan Skip: For busy 
channels. 

Badklit DTMF Microphone 

One~Touch Instant Recall: Recall of 
CALL channels for each band. 

Priority Monitoring 

Dual External Speaker Jacks: One 

for each band. 

Built-in Antenna Duplexer: Standard 
feature. 

Reversed Masked Full Frequency 
LCD 

8 Level Automatic Display /Key 
Lighting Dimmer 

Accessories/Options: FTS-22 
(CTCSS Dual Decode Unit), FRC-4 
(Pager Unit), DVS-3 (Voice Memory & 
Pager Unit), YSK-1L ( W&foot 
Separate Kit Cable) SP- 7 (External 
Speaker), 





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The TS-450S. 

Kenwood's goat is to always offer our 
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The resulting TS-450S and TS6903 
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The TS-450S offers competition class 
reception and 100 W transmission capabili- 
ties on all nine Amateur bands in SSB. CW 
FM, and FSK modes, with 40 W on AM, 
The TS-690S also offers 50 W on six meters. 

For amaztngiy clear reception. Advanced 
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receivers dynamic range to an incredible 



108 dB, An optional Digital Signal Pro- 
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clarity by tailoring the incoming and out- 
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You'll find the TS-450S and TS-690S 
provide truly outstanding sensitivity over 
the entire band, Innovative "triple conver* 
sion " also assures superior stability and 
accuracy, particularly above 24.5 MHz. for 
improved DXing. 

Other refinements include: convenient 
split frequency operation, advanced filter 
functions, optional automatic antenna 
tuner, and 100 memory channels with 
flexible scanning selections. 

Accessories include: PS-33 20.5A 
power supply PS-53 22. 5A heavy duty 
power supply* SP-23 external speaker, 
AT-450 internal automatic antenna tuner. 



AT- 300 external automatic antenna tuner, 
DSP- 100 digital signal processor unit, 
VS-2 voice synthesizer, SO- 2 TXCO, 
MB-430 mobile mount, PG-2X DC cable, 
TU-8 CTCSS encoder, YG-455C-I 500Hz 
CW filter for 455kHz IF, YG-455CN-1 
250Hz CW narrow filter for 455kHz IF, 
YK-88S- 1 2.4kHz SSB filterfor 8,83MHz IE 
YK-88SN1 1.8kHz SSB filter for 8.83MHz IE 
YK-88C-1 500HzCW filter for 8.83MHz IF. 
YK-88CN- 1 270Hz CW filter for 8 83MHz IE 
YK-455C- 1 , 500Hz CW filter for 455kHz IF 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS & TEST EQUIPMENT GROUI 
P.O. BOX 22745, 2201 E, Oominguez Street 
Long Beach, CA90BQ1-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC, 
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Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 



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. . . pacesetter hi Amateur Ritdio